Henry Thynne (1675–1708)

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Longleat House, to which Thynne was the heir, by Jan Siberechts, ca. 1675 Siberechts-ViewovLongleat.jpg
Longleat House, to which Thynne was the heir, by Jan Siberechts, ca. 1675
Thynne's father, Lord Weymouth LordWeymouth.jpg
Thynne's father, Lord Weymouth

Henry Thynne (8 February 1675 – 20 December 1708) was an English Tory politician who sat in the English and British House of Commons from 1701 to 1708.

Kingdom of England Historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Tory A conservative political philosophy

A Tory is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history. The Tory ethos has been summed up with the phrase "God, Queen, and Country". Tories generally advocate monarchism, and were historically of a high church Anglican religious heritage, opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.

House of Commons of Great Britain historic British lower house of Parliament

The House of Commons of Great Britain was the lower house of the Parliament of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801. In 1707, as a result of the Acts of Union of that year, it replaced the House of Commons of England and the third estate of the Parliament of Scotland, as one of the most significant changes brought about by the Union of the kingdoms of England and Scotland into the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Contents

Early life

Thynne was the eldest of the three sons of Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth (1640–1714), of Longleat, a substantial landowner in Wiltshire and Gloucestershire, by his marriage to Lady Frances Finch, a daughter of Heneage Finch, 3rd Earl of Winchilsea. [1] He was christened on 16 February 1675 at Drayton Bassett. [2] [3] He was educated at home and was very interested in literature. In 1692 he visited the Netherlands, Germany, and Italy. [1] As a young man, he taught French and Italian to his contemporary Elizabeth Singer (1674–1737), in whom Bishop Thomas Ken, then living at Longleat, had taken an interest when she was twelve. [4] He married Grace Strode, the daughter and heiress of Sir George Strode and Grace FitzJames, who brought him a fortune of £20,000 on 29 April 1695. In To the Painter of an Ill-Drawn Picture of Cleone, the Honorable Mrs Thynne, a poem by Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea, Thynne appears under the name of "Theanor", [5] [6] while "Cleone" was his wife Grace, to whom Lady Winchilsea addressed several of her poems. [7]

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth English politician and Viscount

Thomas Thynne, 1st Viscount Weymouth was a British peer in the peerage of England.

Longleat stately home in Wiltshire, England, UK

Longleat is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham and near the towns of Warminster and Westbury in Wiltshire and Frome in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park. The house is set in 1,000 acres (400 ha) of parkland landscaped by Capability Brown, with 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of let farmland and 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of woodland, which includes a Center Parcs holiday village. It was the first stately home to open to the public, and the Longleat estate includes the first safari park outside Africa.

Wiltshire County of England

Wiltshire is a county in South West England with an area of 3,485 km2. It is landlocked and borders the counties of Dorset, Somerset, Hampshire, Gloucestershire, Oxfordshire and Berkshire. The county town was originally Wilton, after which the county is named, but Wiltshire Council is now based in the county town of Trowbridge.

Career

At the 1695 English general election Thynne was put up as a candidate for parliament at Weobley but in an unpredictable borough was unsuccessful. [1] He did not stand again until the first general election of 1701 when stood for Weobley again and as a backup at Weymouth and Melcombe Regis. He was rejected at Weobley again but was returned in a contest as Member of Parliament Weymouth. He was not an active Member and was blacklisted for opposing the preparations for war with France. At the second general election of 1701, he stood at both Milborne Port and Tamworth and opted to sit for Tamworth. At Tamworth, he was returned unopposed with Thomas Guy (1644–1724), the speculator and founder of Guy's Hospital. [8] Guy was a Whig, [9] while Thynne was a Tory. [1] Thynne supported the motion on 26 February 1702 which vindicated the Commons’ proceedings in the impeaching the Whig lords. He was returned again as MP for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis at the 1702 English general election. He voted against agreeing with the Lords' amendments to the bill increasing the time for taking the oath of abjuration on 13 February 1703, but in April 1703, he fell ill, and was described by his father as 'overrun with the spleen'. He voted for the Tack on 28 November 1704. At the 1705 English general election, he was returned again as Tory MP for Weymouth and voted against the Court candidate for Speaker on 25 October 1705. He became less active in Parliament. At the 1708 British general election he was returned for two constituencies, Weymouth and Weobley, and chose to sit for Weymouth, before his sudden death. [1]

The 1695 English general election was the first to be held under the terms of the Triennial Act of 1694, which required parliament to be dissolved and fresh elections called at least every three years. This measure helped to fuel partisan rivalry over the coming decades, with the electorate in a constant state of excitement and the Whigs and Tories continually trying to gain the upper hand. Despite the potential for manipulation of the electorate, as was seen under Robert Walpole and his successors, with general elections held an average of every other year, and local and central government positions frequently changing hands between parties, it was impossible for any party or government to be certain of electoral success in the period after 1694, and election results were consequently genuinely representative of the views of at least the section of the population able to vote.

Parliament of England historic legislature of the Kingdom of England

The Parliament of England was the legislature of the Kingdom of England, existing from the early 13th century until 1707, when it united with the Parliament of Scotland to become the Parliament of Great Britain after the political union of England and Scotland created the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Weobley was a parliamentary borough in Herefordshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1295 and from 1628 until 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Later life and legacy

Thynne became extremely obese. After he had died suddenly on 20 December 1708, the findings of a post mortem were reported in a letter to Edward Harley from his sister:

Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer British politician, bibliophile, collector and patron of the arts

Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, styled Lord Harley between 1711 and 1724, was a British politician, bibliophile, collector and patron of the arts.

Though he never complained, his vitals were wholly corrupted, his heart was like a lump of fat and blood, when they touched his lungs they fell to pieces and had an imposthume in them which they think was the cause of his sudden death, his liver wasted, and an ulcer in his kidneys, and a dropsy in one side of his belly. I think this a strange mixture of distempers, but more unaccountable that he should not be sensible of any of them, but told his father and cousin at 12 o’clock the night before he died that he was as well as ever in his life, did not alter two minutes before his death, only said when he came downstairs his legs were weak, did not sit by his lady above six minutes before he died. [1]

On 3 January 1709 he was buried at Longbridge Deverill. He had two daughters, Frances Thynne, who married Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset, and Mary Thynne (ca. 1702–1720), who married William Greville, 7th Baron Brooke (1695–1727). [3] His grandchildren included Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland. [2] [2]

Longbridge Deverill village in United Kingdom

Longbridge Deverill is a village and civil parish about 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south of Warminster in Wiltshire, England. It is on the A350 primary route which connects the M4 motorway and west Wiltshire with Poole, Dorset.

Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset British soldier, politician and landowner

General Algernon Seymour, 7th Duke of Somerset, styled Earl of Hertford until 1748, of Petworth House in Sussex, was a British Army officer and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1708 until 1722 when he was raised to the House of Lords as Baron Percy.

Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland British duchess; Lady of the Bedchamber

Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland, also suo jure2nd Baroness Percy, was a British peer.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Thynne, Hon. Henry (1675-1708)". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 24 November 2011.
  2. 1 2 3 Henry Thynne at thepeerage.com, accessed 20 November 2011
  3. 1 2 Charles Mosley, ed., Burke's Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage (107th edition), vol. 1 (Burke's Peerage, 2003), p. 1291
  4. John Edward Jackson, 'The History of Longleat', in The Wiltshire archæological and natural history magazine, vol. 3 (1857), p. 306
  5. John Buxton, A Tradition of Poetry (London: Macmillan, 1967) p. 168
  6. Anne, Countess of Winchilsea, Poems (1903), of Anne Countess of Winchilsea 1903.djvu/561 p. 561 at Wikisource
  7. George Justice, Nathan Tinker, Women's writing and the circulation of ideas (2002) p. 168
  8. Sir Samuel Wilks, George Thomas Bettany, A biographical history of Guy's Hospital (1892), p. 24: "To the sixth Parliament of William, December 30th, 1701— July 2nd, 1702, Tamworth returned the Hon. Henry Thynne (only son of Lord Weymouth) and Thomas Guy. This was "a popular election and no opposition". "
  9. Collections for a history of Staffordshire (Staffordshire Record Society, 1920), p. 187: "Tamworth : Thomas Guy, Esq. (Whig)"
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Arthur Shallett
Philip Taylor
Michael Harvey
Thomas Freke
Member of Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis
1701
With: Michael Harvey
Charles Churchill
Maurice Ashley
Succeeded by
Charles Churchill
Maurice Ashley
Sir Christopher Wren
George St Loe
Preceded by
Thomas Guy
Sir Henry Gough
Member of Parliament for Tamworth
1701–1702
With: Thomas Guy
Succeeded by
Thomas Guy
Joseph Girdler
Preceded by
Charles Churchill
Sir Christopher Wren
George St Loe
Anthony Henley
Member of Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis
1702–1707
With: Charles Churchill 1702–1707
George St Loe 1702–1705
Anthony Henley 1702–1707
Maurice Ashley 1705–1707
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Weymouth and Melcombe Regis
1707–1708
With: Charles Churchill
Anthony Henley
Maurice Ashley
Succeeded by
Charles Churchill
Anthony Henley
Maurice Ashley
Edward Clavell
Preceded by
Henry Cornewall
John Birch
Member of Parliament for Weobley
1708
With: John Birch
Succeeded by
John Birch
Henry Gorges

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