Henry Trelawny

Last updated

Arms of Trelawny: Argent, a chevron sable TrelawnyArms.png
Arms of Trelawny: Argent, a chevron sable

Brigadier-General Henry Trelawny (ca. 1658 – 8 January 1702) was a British Army officer of Cornish descent, a Member of Parliament and Vice-Admiral of Cornwall.

Contents

Origins

He was the seventh and youngest son of Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 2nd Baronet, of Trelawny in the parish of Pelynt in Cornwall, patron of the nearby pocket borough of East Looe [2] in Cornwall, by his wife Mary Seymour (born 1619), 6th daughter [3] of Sir Edward Seymour, 2nd Baronet (c. 1580–1659) of Berry Pomeroy in Devon, great-grandson of Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, Lord Protector of England and eldest brother of Queen Jane Seymour (d.1537), the third wife of King Henry VIII.

Career

From 1678 to 1681 he was a lieutenant of foot in the Admiral's Regiment. He then obtained a captain's commission in the 2nd Tangier Regiment, commanded by his brother Charles. Made a freeman of the City of Portsmouth in 1683 and of the Borough of East Looe in 1685, he was returned to Parliament in the latter year for West Looe as a Tory on the interest of his eldest brother, Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet, Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester, "Bishop Trelawny", best known for his role in the events leading up to the Glorious Revolution which are referenced in the Cornish anthem The Song of the Western Men . In 1687 he was appointed to the commission of the peace for Cornwall.

During the Glorious Revolution, Charles, with a number of officers and men, including Henry, went over to William of Orange. Both Charles and Henry were returned to the Convention Parliament for East Looe, sitting as Tories. Both served as commissioners for assessment in Cornwall and Devon from 1689 to 1690. [4]

Both brothers were again returned for East Looe as Court Tories in 1690, and continued to sit for the borough until 1698. [5] In early 1692 Charles Trelawny resigned the colonelcy of The Queen Consort's Regiment of Foot (the former 2nd Tangier Regiment) in protest over King William's supposed partiality to foreign officers, and Henry replaced him as colonel. [6] He left with the regiment to campaign in Flanders in March, and as a result came to be regarded as a court supporter in Parliament. Trelawny was again absent from Parliament in 1693 with his regiment in Flanders, where they fought at the Battle of Landen. In November 1693 Trelawny was appointed Vice-Admiral of South Cornwall in place of his elder brother, Bishop Trelawny. In this post, he was active in raising men for naval service over the next few years. While generally a court supporter, he was thought likely to oppose the proposed Council of Trade in the 1696 session. He signed the Association Oath and, unlike his brother, supported fixing the guinea at 22shillings. In 1696 he was a commissioner for receiving subscriptions to the abortive land bank project. [5]

Trelawny took part in the 1696 and 1697 campaigns in Flanders, and was promoted to brigadier-general during the former. In the autumn of 1698 he and Charles were again returned for East Looe, and Charles was also returned for Plymouth, where he served as Governor of Plymouth and for which he preferred to sit. Their first cousin Sir Henry Seymour, 1st Baronet replaced Charles at East Looe in a by-election in January 1699. Henry opposed the bill for disbanding much of the standing army in 1699, although his regiment was not affected. He went on half-pay in March 1700. [5]

In February 1701 he was returned with Charles for Plymouth, allowing Francis Godolphin to take the seat at East Looe. By 1701 he had been appointed a Justice of the Peace for Devon. [4] He opposed preparations for the English entry into the War of the Spanish Succession, but died on 8 January 1702. A large funeral was held for him at Plymouth. [5]

Marriages and progeny

He married twice:

Related Research Articles

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet was a British Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester. Trelawny is best known for his role in the events leading up to the Glorious Revolution which are sometimes believed to be referenced in the Cornish anthem The Song of the Western Men.

Trerice

Trerice is an historic manor in the parish of Newlyn East, near Newquay, Cornwall, United Kingdom. The surviving Tudor manor house known as Trerice House is located at Kestle Mill, three miles east of Newquay. The house with its surrounding garden has been owned by the National Trust since 1953 and is open to the public. The house is a Grade I listed building. The two stone lions on the front lawn are separately listed, Grade II. The garden features an orchard with old varieties of fruit trees.

Pelynt

Pelynt is a civil parish and village in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is 20 miles (32 km) west of Plymouth and four miles (6.5 km) west-northwest of Looe. Pelynt had a population of around 1,124 at the 2001 census which increased to 1,296 at the 2011 census. In addition an electoral ward with the same name exists but extends towards Widegates avoiding Looe at all times. The population at the 2011 for this ward was 4,453.

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 2nd Baronet

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 2nd Baronet, of Trelawny in the parish of Pelynt in Cornwall, England, was a Member of Parliament.

Sir John Trelawny, 4th Baronet

Sir John Trelawny, 4th Baronet, of Trelawne in Cornwall, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1713 to 1734. Trelawny was the eldest son of Sir Jonathan Trelawny, 3rd Baronet and his wife Rebecca Hele, daughter of Thomas Hele of Bascombe, Devon. His father was Bishop of Bristol, Bishop of Exeter and Bishop of Winchester. He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford on 26 January 1708. He married Agnes Blackwood daughter of Thomas Blackwood of Scotland. He succeeded his father in the baronetcy on 19 July 1721.

Salusbury-Trelawny baronets

The Trelawny, later Salusbury-Trelawny Baronetcy, of Trelawny in the County of Cornwall, is a title in the Baronetage of England. It was created on 1 July 1628 for John Trelawny of Trelawny in the parish of Pelynt in Cornwall. The family derived much of their political power from their patronage of the nearby pocket borough of East Looe. The second Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for East Looe, Cornwall and Liskeard. The third Baronet was a clergyman and one of the Seven Bishops imprisoned by James II. The fourth Baronet represented West Looe, Liskeard and East Looe in the House of Commons. The fifth Baronet was Member of Parliament for East Looe. The sixth Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for West Looe and served as Governor of Jamaica. The eighth Baronet was Member of Parliament for East Cornwall 1832–1837 and Lord-Lieutenant of Cornwall. In 1802 he assumed the additional surname of Salusbury. The ninth Baronet represented Tavistock and East Cornwall in Parliament.

Charles Trelawny

Major General Charles Trelawny, also spelt 'Trelawney', was an English soldier from Cornwall who played a prominent part in the 1688 Glorious Revolution, and was a Member of Parliament for various seats between 1685 and 1713.

Efford Suburb of Plymouth, Devon

Efford is an historic manor formerly in the parish of Eggbuckland, Devon, England. Today it has been absorbed by large, mostly post-World War II, eastern suburb of the city of Plymouth. It stands on high ground above the Laira estuary of the River Plym and provides views over long distances: to the north across Dartmoor, to the east and south-east across the South Hams. It consists predominantly of local authority and housing association properties. Before this land was built upon it was known as 'The Wilds of Efford', and was largely unspoilt countryside and marsh land. That a deer park may have been attached to the manor is suggested by the survival of the street name "Deer Park Drive".

Sir Harry Trelawny, 5th Baronet

Sir Harry Trelawny, 5th Baronet, of Whitleigh, Devon, was a British Army officer and Tory politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1708 to 1710.

Sir John Trelawny, 1st Baronet

Sir John Trelawny, 1st Baronet was a Cornish baronet and soldier from Trelawne, Cornwall. He was High Sheriff of Cornwall.

John Pollexfen

John Pollexfen (1636–1715), of Walbrooke House in the parish of St Stephen Walbrook, City of London and of Wembury House in Devon, was a merchant, a courtier to Kings Charles II and William III, and a political economist who served four times as a Member of Parliament for Plympton Erle in Devon, in 1679, 1681, 1689 and 1690. He was opposed to the monopoly of the East India Company.

Morval, Cornwall

Morval is a rural civil parish, hamlet and historic manor in southeast Cornwall, England, UK. The hamlet is approximately two miles (3 km) north of Looe and five miles (8 km) south of Liskeard.

Jonathan Trelawny (High Sheriff of Cornwall)

Sir Jonathan Trelawny, of Pool in Menheniot, Cornwall, was an English Member of Parliament. Trelawny was the posthumous younger son of John Trelawny of Pool ; his elder brother died in infancy and he inherited the estate. He entered Parliament as member for Liskeard, representing that borough in three parliaments, and subsequently also represented Cornwall in the Parliaments of 1597 and 1604. On one occasion he was sent to the Tower of London for losing his temper during a parliamentary debate where he "dealt his opponent, Mr Ashe, a thundering box to his ear" and "flashed his sword".

John Harris (1596–1648) of Lanrest, Liskeard in Cornwall and of Radford in the parish of Plymstock in Devon, was an English gentleman who was elected four times as a Member of Parliament for Liskeard in Cornwall, between 1628 and 1644. He supported the Royalist side in the Civil War.

Sir Reginald Mohun, 1st Baronet

Sir Reginald Mohun, 1st Baronet of Boconnoc in Cornwall, was a prominent member of the gentry of Cornwall and an MP.

Trewan Hall

Trewan Hall is a historic manor house in the parish of St Columb Major, Cornwall, England, UK. The surviving Jacobean style manor house is located one mile north of the town. It was the ancestral estate of the Vivian family for over 300 years, until it was sold in 1920.

Kenedon historic manor in Devon, England

Kenedon is an historic manor situated in the parish of Sherford in Devon.

Trelawny is an historic manor in the parish of Pelynt in Cornwall, England, situated 20 miles (32 km) west of Plymouth, Devon and four miles (6.4 km) west-northwest of Looe, Cornwall. It was long the seat of the Trelawny family, later Trelawny baronets, one of the most eminent of Cornish gentry families, much of whose political power derived from their control of the pocket borough of nearby East Looe. The surviving grade II* listed manor house known as Trelawne House is today used for holiday accommodation and entertainment, under the name "Trelawne Manor Holiday Park".

John Woolcombe

John Woolcombe (1680-1713) of Pitton in the parish of Yealmpton in Devon, was a Member of Parliament for Plymouth in Devon 1702–5, and served as Sheriff of Devon in 1711–12.

Trelawny or Trelawney is a habitational surname that originated in Cornwall. The family are said to have descended from Haemlin, who held several manors from Robert, Count of Mortain, according to the Domesday Book.

References

  1. Kidd, Charles, Debrett's peerage & Baronetage 2015 Edition, London, 2015, p.B796
  2. History of Parliament biog: "Returned for his family’s borough of East Looe"
  3. Vivian, p.703, pedigree of Seymour
  4. 1 2 3 "Trelawny, Henry (c.1658-1702), of Trelawne, Pelynt, Cornw". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 7 May 2013.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 "Trelawny, Henry (c.1658-1702), of Whitleigh, Devon". History of Parliament Trust. Retrieved 7 May 2013.
  6. "Trelawny, Charles"  . Dictionary of National Biography . London: Smith, Elder & Co. 1885–1900.
  7. Date of birth per Vivian, p.440
  8. Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, pp.439-40, pedigree of Hals of Kenedon
  9. Risdon, Tristram (d.1640), Survey of Devon, 1811 edition, London, 1811, with 1810 Additions, p.401
  10. Kimber, Edward; Johnson, Richard; Wotton, Thomas (1771). Baronetage of England. G. Woodfall. pp.  311–312. Retrieved 2 August 2007.
  11. Vivian, John Lambrick (1887). The Visitation of Cornwall. pp. 477–478.
Parliament of England
Preceded by Member of Parliament for West Looe
1685–1687
With: James Kendall
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for East Looe
1689–1700
With: Charles Trelawny 1689–1699
Sir Henry Seymour, Bt 1699–1700
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Plymouth
1701–1702
With: Charles Trelawny
Succeeded by
Military offices
Preceded by Colonel of The Queen Consort's Regiment of Foot
1692–1702
Succeeded by
Honorary titles
Preceded by Vice-Admiral of South Cornwall
1693–1702
Succeeded by