Herb Graham

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Herb Graham

Deputy Premier of Western Australia
In office
3 March 1971 30 May 1973
Member of the Western Australian Parliament
for Balcatta
In office
31 March 1962 30 May 1973
Preceded byNew creation
Succeeded by Brian Burke
Member of the Western Australian Parliament
for East Perth
In office
14 August 1943 31 March 1962
Preceded by Tom Hughes
Succeeded bySeat abolished
Personal details
Born
Herbert Ernst Graham

(1911-04-06)6 April 1911
Narrogin, Australia
Died17 March 1982(1982-03-17) (aged 70)
Stirling, Australia
NationalityAustralian
Political party Labor Party
Spouse(s)Norma Eileen Wilson (1936-1951)
Beryl Grace Kirkby (1952-1982)
Relations Larry Graham (nephew)
Profession Draftsman

Herbert Ernst Graham (6 April 1911 17 March 1982) was an Australian politician.

Contents

Biography

Graham was born in Narrogin, Western Australia on 6 April 1911 to parents from South Australia. Graham attended school in Narrogin and Northam. [1]

His father, farmer William Graham, was a candidate for the Western Australian Legislative Council in the 1912 Legislative Council election. He later unsuccessfully stood for the Australian Senate in 1919, finishing with only 2% of the Western Australian vote. [1] [2] [3]

His nephew, Larry Graham later represented the Labor Party in the Western Australian Parliament from 1989. [4]

Working life

In 1928, Graham joined the Western Australian Government Department of Lands and Surveys as a cadet draftsman. In the mid-1930s, he joined the Department of Forests. [1]

Public life

Early politics

After joining the Australian Labor Party in 1929 he soon became heavily involved in politics. By 1933 he was a member of the ALP state executive. In 1934 he was an unsuccessful candidate for the House of Representatives seat of Perth. In 1940 he was a candidate for the Senate though he only garnered 2% of the Western Australian vote, the same percentage as his father in 1919. [2] [5] [6]

Entry to Parliament

In 1943 Graham was elected to the seat of East Perth in a by-election caused by the resignation of Tom Hughes. [1] [7]

With the election of the Hawke Labor government in 1953 Graham became a Cabinet minister with responsibilities for the portfolios of housing and forests. As housing minister Graham was responsible for an increase in the number of state-owned residential properties. An apartment complex, Graham Flats in West Perth, built while he was housing minister, was named in his honour. In 1957 Graham took on responsibility for transport, presiding over the implementation of an integrated bus system. [1] [8]

Between 1959 and 1971 Graham served the ALP in opposition, rising to deputy opposition leader in 1966. When the Tonkin government took power in 1971 Graham became Deputy Premier. He took on responsibility for town planning between 1971 and 1973. [1] [9]

In 1973 after a series of disagreements with Tonkin, Graham resigned from Parliament. In the by-election that followed, Brian Burke was elected by thirty votes. [1] [7]

Civic life

After leaving Parliament Graham was appointed chairman of the state Licensing Court. [1]

A fluent Italian-speaker, Graham was involved in the Western Australia Italian Club, becoming a life member of the club. He was honoured by the Italian government with an Order of Merit of the Italian Republic. [1]

He was a patron of the East Perth Football Club and was a life member. [10]

Death

Graham died on 17 March 1982 in Stirling, Western Australia. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Graham, Herbert Ernst (1911 - 1982). Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  2. 1 2 "INDEX OF CANDIDATES FOR THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND THE SENATE 1901-2002". Adam Carr's Election Archive. Adam Carr. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  3. "SENATE 1919". Adam Carr's Election Archive. Adam Carr. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  4. "Thursday, 13 April 1989" (PDF). Hansard. Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  5. "Australian Labor Party pamphlet for the 1940 federal elections". Australian Labor Party. John Curtin Prime Ministerial Library. Retrieved 17 June 2010.
  6. "1940 SENATE - WESTERN AUSTRALIA". Adam Carr's Election Archive. Adam Carr. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  7. 1 2 "By-elections in Western Australia" (PDF). Parliamentary Library Western Australia. Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 11 June 2010.[ dead link ]
  8. "Assessment Documentation - Graham Flats" (PDF). Register of Heritage Places. Heritage Council of Western Australia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 September 2009. Retrieved 9 June 2010.
  9. "Deputy Premiers of Western Australia" (PDF). Parliamentary Library Western Australia. Parliament of Western Australia. Retrieved 9 June 2010.[ permanent dead link ]
  10. "EPFC Life Members". East Perth Football Club. Archived from the original on 18 February 2011. Retrieved 17 June 2010.