Herbert Feis

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Herbert Feis (June 7, 1893 – March 2, 1972) was an American Historian and economist. He was the Economic Advisor for International Affairs to the U.S. Department of State in the Hoover and Roosevelt administrations.

Herbert Hoover 31st president of the United States

Herbert Clark Hoover was an American engineer, businessman, and politician who served as the 31st president of the United States from 1929 to 1933. A member of the Republican Party, he held office during the onset of the Great Depression. Prior to serving as president, Hoover led the Commission for Relief in Belgium, served as the director of the U.S. Food Administration, and served as the 3rd U.S. Secretary of Commerce.

Franklin D. Roosevelt 32nd president of the United States

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Contents

Feis wrote at least 13 published books and won the annual Pulitzer Prize for History in 1961 for one of them, Between War and Peace: The Potsdam Conference (Princeton University Press, 1960). [1] It features the Potsdam Conference and the origins of the Cold War.

Pulitzer Prize for History

The Pulitzer Prize for History, administered by Columbia University, is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It has been presented since 1917 for a distinguished book about the history of the United States. Thus it is one of the original Pulitzers, for the program was inaugurated in 1917 with seven prizes, four of which were awarded that year. The Pulitzer Prize program has also recognized some historical work with its Biography prize, from 1917, and its General Non-Fiction prize, from 1952.

Princeton University Press independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University. Its mission is to disseminate scholarship within academia and society at large.

Potsdam Conference

The Potsdam Conference was held at Cecilienhof, the home of Crown Prince Wilhelm in Potsdam, occupied Germany, from 17 July to 2 August 1945. The participants were the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States, represented respectively by Communist Party General Secretary Joseph Stalin, Prime Ministers Winston Churchill and Clement Attlee, and President Harry S. Truman.

Biography

Feis was born in New York City and raised on the Lower East Side. His parents, Louis Feis and Louise Waterman Feis, were Jewish immigrants from Alsace, France that came to America in the late 1800s. His uncle invented the Waterman stove. He graduated from Harvard University and went on to marry the granddaughter of James Garfield, the 20th president of the US. [2]

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Harvard University private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

Harvard University is a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with about 6,700 undergraduate students and about 15,250 postgraduate students. Established in 1636 and named for its first benefactor, clergyman John Harvard, Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning, and its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.

He died in Winter Park, Florida.

Herbert Feis Award

The Herbert Feis Award is awarded annually since 1984 by the American Historical Association, the pre-eminent professional society of historians, to recognize the recent work of public historians or independent scholars. [3]

American Historical Association Oldest and largest society of historians and professors of history in the United States

The American Historical Association (AHA) is the oldest and largest society of historians and professors of history in the United States. Founded in 1884, the association promotes historical studies, the teaching of history, and the preservation of and access to historical materials. It publishes The American Historical Review five times a year, with scholarly articles and book reviews. The AHA is the major organization for historians working in the United States, while the Organization of American Historians is the major organization for historians who study and teach about the United States.

Bibliography

See also

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Tehran Conference convention

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Yalta Conference

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The following are the Pulitzer Prizes for 1961.

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<i>Between War and Peace: The Potsdam Conference</i> book by Herbert Feis

Between War and Peace: The Potsdam Conference is a book by Herbert Feis. It won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize for History.

This bibliography of Woodrow Wilson is a list of published works about Woodrow Wilson, 28th President of the United States.

References

  1. "History". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 2013-11-25.
  2. "Herbert Feis". American Authors by Answers.com. Answers.com. 2004.
  3. "Herbert Feis Award". American Historical Association. Retrieved 29 March 2015.
  4. Feis, Herbert (2008-12-13). The Settlement of Wage Disputes.
  5. Feis, Herbert (1930-01-01). Europe, the world's banker, 1870-1914: an account of European foreign investment and the connection of world finance with diplomacy before the war. Yale University Press.
  6. Feis, Herbert (1940-01-01). The changing pattern of international economic affairs. Harper & Brothers.
  7. Feis, Herbert (1947-01-01). Seen from E. A.: Three International Episodes. Knopf.
  8. Herbert Feis (1948-01-01). The Spanish Story. Alfred A. Knopf.
  9. Van Alstyne, Richard W. (1951-01-01). "Review of The Road to Pearl Harbor. The Coming of the War Between the United States and Japan". The Far Eastern Quarterly. 11 (1): 107–109. doi:10.2307/2048916. JSTOR   2048916.
  10. Feis, Herbert (2015-03-08). China Tangle: The American Effort in China from Pearl Harbor to the Marshall Mission. Princeton University Press. ISBN   9781400868278.
  11. Herbert Feis (1957-01-01). Churchill Roosevelt Stalin. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS.
  12. Feis, Herbert (1960-01-01). Between War and Peace: The Potsdam Conference. Princeton University Press. ISBN   9780691056036.
  13. Stein, Harold (1962-01-01). Feis, Herbert, ed. "The Rationale of Japanese Surrender". World Politics. 15 (1): 138–150. doi:10.2307/2009572. JSTOR   2009572.
  14. Feis, Herbert (1966-08-01). The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II (2nd Revised ed.). Princeton University Press. ISBN   9780691056012.
  15. Feis, Herbert (1966-01-01). 1933: Characters in Crisis. Little, Brown.
  16. Feis, Herbert (1970-01-01). From trust to terror: the onset of the cold war, 1945-1950. Norton.
  17. Yergler, Dennis (1993-08-01). Herbert Feis, Wilsonian internationalism, and America's technological-democracy. P. Lang. ISBN   9780820420783.
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