Herbert Hoover

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  1. Hoover later became the first president born west of the Mississippi River, and remains the only president born in Iowa. [5]
  2. Hoover later claimed to be the first student at Stanford, by virtue of having been the first person in the first class to sleep in the dormitory. [22]

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The following is a list of important scholarly resources related to Herbert Hoover, the 31st president of the United States. For recent work see Ellis W. Hawley (2018). For older studies see Patrick G. O’Brien and Philip T. Rosen, (1981), 25–42, 83–99 and Patrick G. O’Brien, (1988).

The presidential transition of Herbert Hoover began when he won the United States 1928 United States presidential election, becoming the president-elect, and ended when Hoover was inaugurated at noon EST on March 4, 1929.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Foreign policy of Herbert Hoover</span>

Foreign policy of Herbert Hoover covers the international activities and policies of Herbert Hoover for his entire career, with emphasis to his roles from 1914 to 1933.

References

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Works cited

Further reading

Biographies

  • Best, Gary Dean. The Politics of American Individualism: Herbert Hoover in Transition, 1918–1921 (1975)
  • Best, Gary Dean. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Keeper of the Torch, 1933–1964. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.
  • Clements, Kendrick A. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Imperfect Visionary, 1918–1928 (2010).
  • Edwards, Barry C. "Putting Hoover on the Map: Was the 31st President a Progressive?" Congress & the Presidency 41#1 (2014) pp 49–83 online
  • Hatfield, Mark. ed. Herbert Hoover Reassessed (2002)
  • Hawley, Ellis (1989), Herbert Hoover and the Historians.
  • Jeansonne, Glen. The Life of Herbert Hoover: Fighting Quaker, 1928–1933. Palgrave Macmillan; 2012.
  • Lloyd, Craig. Aggressive Introvert: A Study of Herbert Hoover and Public Relations Management, 1912–1932 (1973).
  • Nash, George H. The Life of Herbert Hoover: The Engineer 1874–1914 (1983); in-depth scholarly study
    • (1988), The Humanitarian, 1914–1917, The Life of Herbert Hoover, vol. 2.
    • (1996), Master of Emergencies, 1917–1918, The Life of Herbert Hoover, vol. 3.
  • Nash, Lee, ed. Understanding Herbert Hoover: Ten Perspectives (1987); essays by scholars
  • Smith, Richard Norton. An Uncommon Man: The Triumph of Herbert Hoover, (1987), biography concentrating on post 1932.
  • Walch, Timothy. ed. Uncommon Americans: The Lives and Legacies of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover Praeger, 2003.
  • West, Hal Elliott. Hoover, the Fishing President: Portrait of the Man and his Life Outdoors (2005).

Scholarly studies

  • Arnold, Peri E. "The 'Great Engineer' as Administrator: Herbert Hoover and Modern Bureaucracy." Review of Politics 42.3 (1980): 329–348. JSTOR   1406794.
  • Barber, William J. From New Era to New Deal: Herbert Hoover, the Economists, and American Economic Policy, 1921–1933. (1985)
  • Claus Bernet (2009). "Hoover, Herbert". In Bautz, Traugott (ed.). Biographisch-Bibliographisches Kirchenlexikon (BBKL) (in German). Vol. 30. Nordhausen: Bautz. cols. 644–653. ISBN   978-3-88309-478-6.
  • Brandes, Joseph. Herbert Hoover and Economic Diplomacy: Department of Commerce Policy, 1921–1928. (U of Pittsburgh Press, 1970).
  • Britten, Thomas A. "Hoover and the Indians: the Case for Continuity in Federal Indian Policy, 1900–1933" Historian 1999 61(3): 518–538. ISSN   0018-2370.
  • Clements, Kendrick A. Hoover, Conservation, and Consumerism: Engineering the Good Life. University Press of Kansas, 2000
  • Dodge, Mark M., ed. Herbert Hoover and the Historians. (1989)
  • Fausold Martin L. and George Mazuzan, eds. The Hoover Presidency: A Reappraisal (1974)
  • Goodman, Mark, and Mark Gring. "The Radio Act of 1927: progressive ideology, epistemology, and praxis". Rhetoric & Public Affairs 3.3 (2000): 397–418.
  • Hawley, Ellis."Herbert Hoover and the Historians—Recent Developments: A Review Essay" Annals of Iowa 78#1 (2018) pp. 75–86 DOI
  • Hawley, Ellis. "Herbert Hoover, the Commerce Secretariat, and the Vision of an 'Associative State', 1921–1928". Journal of American History, (June 1974) 61#1: 116–140.
  • Jansky Jr, C. M. "The contribution of Herbert Hoover to broadcasting." Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media 1.3 (1957): 241–249.
  • Lee, David D. "Herbert Hoover and the Development of Commercial Aviation, 1921–1926." Business History Review 58.1 (1984): 78–102.
  • Lichtman, Allan J. Prejudice and the Old Politics: The Presidential Election of 1928 (1979)
  • Lisio, Donald J. The President and Protest: Hoover, MacArthur, and the Bonus Riot, 2d ed. (1994)
  • Lisio, Donald J. Hoover, Blacks, and Lily-whites: A Study of Southern Strategies (1985)
  • Parafianowicz,Halina. 'Herbert C. Hoover and Poland: 1919–1933. Between Myth and Reality'
  • Polsky, Andrew J., and Olesya Tkacheva. "Legacies Versus Politics: Herbert Hoover, Partisan Conflict, and the Symbolic Appeal of Associationalism in the 1920s." International Journal of Politics, Culture, and Society 16.2 (2002): 207–235. online
  • Short, Brant. "The Rhetoric of the Post-Presidency: Herbert Hoover's Campaign against the New Deal, 1934–1936" Presidential Studies Quarterly (1991) 21#2 pp. 333–350 online
  • Sibley, Katherine A.S., ed. A Companion to Warren G. Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover (2014); 616pp; essays by scholars stressing historiography
  • Wueschner, Silvano A. Charting Twentieth-Century Monetary Policy: Herbert Hoover and Benjamin Strong, 1917–1927. Greenwood, 1999

Primary sources

  • Myers, William Starr; Walter H. Newton, eds. (1936). The Hoover Administration; a documented narrative.
  • Hawley, Ellis, ed. (1974–1977). Herbert Hoover: Containing the Public Messages, Speeches, and Statements of the President, 4 vols.
  • Hoover, Herbert Clark (1934), The Challenge to Liberty.
  • (1938), Addresses Upon The American Road, 1933–1938.
  • (1941), Addresses Upon The American Road, 1940–41.
  • ; and Gibson, Hugh (1942), The Problems of Lasting Peace.
  • (1949), Addresses Upon The American Road, 1945–48.
  • (1952a), Years of adventure, 1874–1920 (PDF), Memoirs, vol. 1, New York, archived from the original (PDF) on December 17, 2008.
  • (1952b), The Cabinet and the Presidency, 1920–1933 (PDF), Memoirs, vol. 2, New York, archived from the original (PDF) on December 17, 2008.
  • (1952c), The Great Depression, 1929–1941 (PDF), Memoirs, vol. 3, New York, archived from the original (PDF) on December 17, 2008.
  • Miller, Dwight M.; Walch, Timothy, eds. (1998), Herbert Hoover and Franklin D. Roosevelt: A Documentary History, Contributions in American History, Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, ISBN   978-0-313-30608-2
  • Hoover, Herbert Clark (2011), Nash, George H. (ed.), Freedom Betrayed: Herbert Hoover's Secret History of the Second World War and Its Aftermath, Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, ISBN   978-0-8179-1234-5 .
  • Hoover, Herbert Clark (2013), Nash, George H. (ed.), The Crusade Years, 1933–1955: Herbert Hoover's Lost Memoir of the New Deal Era and Its Aftermath, Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, ISBN   978-0-8179-1674-9 .
Herbert Hoover
President Hoover portrait.jpg
Hoover in 1928
31st President of the United States
In office
March 4, 1929 March 4, 1933