Herbert Sutcliffe

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^ Note that there are different versions of Sutcliffe's first-class career totals as a result of his participation in the 1930–31 Indian season. See Variations in first-class cricket statistics for more information.

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William Herbert Hobbs Sutcliffe was an English amateur first-class cricketer, and the son of Herbert Sutcliffe; his middle name was in honour of Jack Hobbs.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Herbert Sutcliffe's cricket career (1919–1927)</span>

Herbert Sutcliffe made his first-class debut for Yorkshire in the 1919 season, during which he and Percy Holmes developed one of county cricket's greatest opening partnerships. After initial success, Sutcliffe had a couple of relatively lean seasons before fulfilling his promise in 1922. In 1924, he made his debut for England in Test cricket and formed a famous Test opening partnership with Jack Hobbs. He enjoyed personal success on the 1924–25 MCC tour of Australia, although England lost the Test series 4–1 to Australia. In the 1926 Ashes series against Australia, Hobbs and Sutcliffe produced a series-winning partnership at The Oval in difficult batting conditions. By the end of the 1927 season, Sutcliffe was one of the world's premier cricketers and was being considered, although he was a professional, for the captaincy of Yorkshire.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Herbert Sutcliffe's cricket career (1928–1932)</span>

During the five years 1928 to 1932, Herbert Sutcliffe played throughout the period for Yorkshire, continuing his highly successful opening partnership with Percy Holmes which reached its peak of achievement in 1932 when they set a then world record partnership for any wicket of 555, the stand including Sutcliffe's career highest score of 313. For England in Test cricket, Sutcliffe made his only tour of South Africa in 1927–28 and his second tour of Australia in 1928–29, during which he played arguably the greatest innings of his career. In the winter of 1930–31, he and Jack Hobbs went on a private tour of India and Ceylon which has caused some controversy in terms of their career statistics. Sutcliffe opened the innings for England throughout the period, playing in home series each season but most notably against Australia in 1930.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Herbert Sutcliffe's cricket career (1933–1939)</span>

During the seven years 1933 to 1939, Herbert Sutcliffe played throughout the period for Yorkshire during one of the club's most successful phases. His Test career ended in 1935 but he formed a new opening partnership for Yorkshire with the young Len Hutton. In 1939, he was the first Yorkshire player to be called up for military service as the Second World War loomed.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Later cricket career of Jack Hobbs</span> English professional cricketer

Sir John Berry "Jack" Hobbs was an English professional cricketer who played for Surrey from 1905 to 1934 and for England in 61 Test matches between 1908 and 1930. Having established himself as the best batsman in the world before the First World War, Hobbs resumed cricket in 1919 and was immediately successful in County Cricket. He successfully toured Australia with the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) in 1920–21 but sustained an injury which affected his batting on that tour and in the subsequent English season. Also in that 1921 season, he fell seriously ill with appendicitis; the effects of the illness and subsequent operation affected his batting for several seasons and his stamina never fully recovered. When he returned from the illness, Hobbs was a far less attacking batsman than he had been in his earlier career, but was much more secure and assured. As a result, his performances were statistically better than before 1914 and his reputation among the public grew. Adulation for Hobbs reached its peak in 1925 when he broke W. G. Grace's record for most first-class centuries, and the following season he made a century in extremely difficult batting conditions which was instrumental in England winning the Ashes. At this time, he also established extremely effective opening partnerships—with Herbert Sutcliffe for England and Andy Sandham for Surrey.

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Bibliography

Herbert Sutcliffe
Herbert Sutcliffe 1933.jpg
Herbert Sutcliffe in 1933
Personal information
Full nameHerbert Sutcliffe
Born(1894-11-24)24 November 1894
Summerbridge, Nidderdale, West Riding of Yorkshire, England
Died22 January 1978(1978-01-22) (aged 83)
Cross Hills, North Yorkshire, England
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm medium
RoleBatsman
Relations WHH Sutcliffe (son)
International information
National side
Test debut(cap  215)14 June 1924 v  South Africa
Last Test29 June 1935 v  South Africa
Domestic team information
YearsTeam