Herbert Tichy

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Herbert Tichy (June 1, 1912 - September 26, 1987) was an Austrian author, geologist, journalist and climber.

His first ascent of Cho Oyu was on October 19, 1954, with Sepp Jöchler and Pasang Dawa Lama. [1]


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References

  1. Sale, Richard. On Top of the World: Climbing the World's 14 Highest Mountains. HarperCollins, 2000, pp.105-107

See also