Heritage New Zealand

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Heritage New Zealand
Pouhere Taonga
New Zealand Historic Places Trust logo.svg
New Zealand Historic Places Trust logo
Type Crown entity
PurposeProtecting New Zealand's heritage
Headquarters Antrim House, Boulcott Street
Location
Region served
New Zealand
Chair
Hon. Marian Hobbs
Main organ
Board of Trustees
Affiliations Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage
Ministry for Culture and Heritage
Department of Conservation
Te Puni Kōkiri
Budget
NZ$12,975,000 [1]
Website www.heritage.org.nz

Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga (initially the National Historic Places Trust and then, from 1963 to 2014, the New Zealand Historic Places Trust) (Māori : Pouhere Taonga) is a Crown entity with a membership of around 20,000 people that advocates for the protection of ancestral sites and heritage buildings in New Zealand. It was set up through the Historic Places Act 1954 with a mission to "...promote the identification, protection, preservation and conservation of the historical and cultural heritage of New Zealand" and is an autonomous Crown entity. Its current enabling legislation is the Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.

Contents

History

Charles Bathurst, 1st Viscount Bledisloe gifted the site where the Treaty of Waitangi was signed to the nation in 1932. The subsequent administration through the Waitangi Trust is sometimes seen as the beginning of formal heritage protection in New Zealand. Public discussion about heritage protection occurred in 1940 in conjunction with the centenary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. The purchase of Pompallier House in 1943 by the government further raised the issue of how historic buildings should be cared for. [2]

Duncan Rae, the MP representing the Parnell electorate, suggested that a heritage organisation should be set up and put in a private member's bill. Whilst this did not proceed, the First National Government of New Zealand (of which he was a member) took responsibility of the issue and the Historic Places Act 1954 was passed, which established the National Historic Places Trust as a non-governmental organisation (NGO). The trust was governed by a 12-member board plus a chairman, and they first met in 1955. The National Historic Places Trust came under the responsibility of the Minister of Internal Affairs. The composition of the board was defined in the legislation and the board was appointed on the recommendation of the minister. The name of the organisation was changed to New Zealand Historic Places Trust in 1963. [3]

Early work undertaken by the trust included the recording of Māori rock paintings, as some sites were to be submerged, e.g. through the Waipapa Dam and Benmore Dam. In 1961, the trust bought Te Waimate mission, the second-oldest building in New Zealand. In Akaroa, the trust enabled the Akaroa County Council via a significant grant to buy the Eteveneaux cottage, which serves as a link to Akaroa's French past. [4] [5] [6]

In 2004, the New Zealand Historic Places Trust became an autonomous crown entity. On 14 April 2014, the organisation's name changed to Heritage New Zealand. Later that year, the enabling legislation—Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014—was passed. There were changes in governance introduced by the new legislation, e.g. the branch committees were dispensed with. The legislation, which came into effect on 20 May 2014, also finished the transition from an NGO to a crown entity. [7] [8]

Governance

It is governed by a board, appointed by the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage and currently chaired by Hon. Marian Hobbs, and a Māori Heritage Council, currently chaired by Sir John Clarke. Past chairs include Dame Anne Salmond. The head office is in Antrim House, Wellington, while regional and area offices are in Kerikeri, Auckland, Tauranga, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

Publication

It publishes the quarterly magazine Heritage New Zealand.

Listings

Buildings owned by Heritage New Zealand include the Kerikeri Mission House, the Stone Store, and the Te Waimate Mission house.

New Zealand Heritage List / Rārangi Kōrero

The New Zealand Heritage List / Rārangi Kōrero (formerly known as the Register) is divided into five main areas:

The historic places are organised in two categories:

As of 2014, the register contains over 5,600 entries. [9] The Canterbury earthquakes of September 2010 and February 2011 resulted in damage to a number of historic buildings in Christchurch. Post-earthquake redevelopment has caused a significant loss of heritage buildings in Christchurch. [10]

Māori Heritage Council

The Māori Heritage Council (MHC) sits within Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga and was established by the Historic Places Act 1993. The functions of the Council [11] include:

As of 2014 Sir John Clarke is the chair of the MHC.

Equivalent function outside New Zealand

See also

Related Research Articles

Treaty of Waitangi 1840 treaty between representatives of the British Crown and various Māori chiefs

The Treaty of Waitangi is a treaty first signed on 6 February 1840 by representatives of the British Crown and Māori chiefs (rangatira) from the North Island of New Zealand. It has become a document of central importance to the history, to the political constitution of the state, and to the national mythos of New Zealand, and has played a major role in framing the political relations between New Zealand's government and the Māori population, especially from the late 20th century.

Taonga or taoka is a Māori language word which refers to a treasured possession in Māori culture. Due to the lack of a direct translation to English and the significance of its use in the Treaty of Waitangi, the word has been widely adopted into New Zealand English as a loanword. The current definition differs from the historical definition, noted by Hongi Hika as "property procured by the spear" [one could understand this as war booty or defended property] and is now interpreted to mean a wide range of tangible and intangible possessions, especially items of historical cultural significance.

Te Waimate mission

Te Waimate Mission was the fourth mission station established in New Zealand and the first settlement inland from the Bay of Islands. The members of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) appointed to establish Te (the) Waimate Mission at Waimate North were the Rev. William Yate and lay members Richard Davis, George Clarke and James Hamlin.

Mission House

The Mission House at Kerikeri in New Zealand was completed in 1822 as part of the Kerikeri Mission Station by the Church Missionary Society, and is New Zealand’s oldest surviving building. It is sometimes known as Kemp House.

Stone Store Historic building in New Zealand

The Stone Store at Kerikeri in the Bay of Islands is New Zealand’s oldest surviving stone building.

The architecture of New Zealand, though influenced by various cultures, expresses predominantly European styles. Polynesian influences emerge in some areas.

Waimate North Place in Northland Region, New Zealand

Waimate North is a small settlement in Northland, New Zealand. It is situated between Kerikeri and Lake Omapere, west of the Bay of Islands.

The law of New Zealand uses the English common law system, inherited from being a part of the British Empire.

Ministry for Culture and Heritage Cultural ministry in New Zealand

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is the department of the New Zealand Government responsible for supporting the arts, culture, built heritage, sport and recreation, and broadcasting sectors in New Zealand and advising government on such.

Tikitiki Place in Gisborne Region, New Zealand

Tikitiki is a small town in Waiapu Valley on the north bank of the Waiapu River in the Gisborne Region of the North Island of New Zealand. The area in which the town resides was formerly known as Kahukura. By road, Tikitiki is 145 km (90 mi) north-northeast of Gisborne, 20 km (12 mi) northeast by north of Ruatoria, and 24 km (15 mi) south by east of Te Araroa. The name of the town comes from the full name of Māui, Māui-tikitiki-a-Taranga. State Highway 35 passes through the town at the easternmost point of the New Zealand state highway network.

Gisborne District Council is the unitary authority for the Gisborne District of New Zealand. The council consists of a mayor and 13 ward councillors. The district consists of the city of Gisborne and a largely rural region on the east coast of the North Island.

George Clarke was a New Zealand missionary, teacher, public servant, politician and judge. He was born in Wymondham, Norfolk, England on 27 January 1798. He joined the Church Missionary Society (CMS). Clarke married Martha Elizabeth Blomfield. the second daughter of Ezekiel Blomfield, a Congregational minister.

The New Zealand Church Missionary Society is a mission society working within the Anglican Communion and Protestant, Evangelical Anglicanism. The parent organisation was founded in England in 1799. The Church Missionary Society (CMS) sent missionaries to settle in New Zealand. The Rev. Samuel Marsden, the Society's Agent and the Senior Chaplain to the New South Wales government, officiated at its first service on Christmas Day in 1814, at Oihi Bay in the Bay of Islands, New Zealand.

James Shepherd (1796–1882) was an Australian-born Wesleyan Christian missionary and settler in Northland, New Zealand. He was prominent in the early European community of the Bay of Islands, involved in construction of the Stone Store in Kerikeri, and involved in drafting of the first written Maori publications.

Arthur's Stone, located near Kerikeri, is recognised as New Zealand's earliest monument to a Pākehā (European). It was erected in November 1840, by Reverend Richard Taylor in memory of his 10-year-old son Arthur who died at the site as a result of a fall from a horse. The stone was entered into the Heritage New Zealand list of historic places on 14 May 2008, as a Category 1 List No:7743.

Piripi Kingi Karawai Patiki was a teacher and missionary, who was blind. Of Māori descent, he was a rangatira (chief) of the Ngāpuhi iwi (tribe). He was born near Titoki in the Mangakahia Valley, Northland, New Zealand. Sir William Martin, the first chief justice of New Zealand, said of Piripi Patiki that he resembled the well-known bust of Socrates.

Takapūneke Place in Christchurch City, New Zealand

Takapūneke, with the location also known as Red House Bay, is a former kāinga—an unfortified Māori village—adjacent to present-day Akaroa, New Zealand. Takapūneke was a major trading post for the local iwi (tribe), Ngāi Tahu, as there was safe anchorage for European vessels. The site is of significance to Ngāi Tahu as their tribal chief, Tama-i-hara-nui, was captured here by North Island Ngāti Toa chief Te Rauparaha, and then tortured and killed. The village itself was raided and subject of a massacre, with the events subsequently called the Elizabeth affair. There is a direct link from the massacre in 1830 to the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, giving the site a status of national significance.

Puketona Locality in New Zealand

Puketona is a locality at the junction of State Highway 10 and State Highway 11 in the Far North District of New Zealand. Kerikeri is 10 kilometres north, Paihia is 14 kilometres east, Moerewa is 15 kilometres southeast, and Kaikohe is 20 kilometres southwest.

References

  1. Annual Report 2007-8
  2. McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "New Zealand Historic Places Trust". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Wellington: Ministry for Culture and Heritage. ISBN   978-0-478-18451-8 . Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  3. McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "Constitution of the Trust". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Wellington: Ministry for Culture and Heritage. ISBN   978-0-478-18451-8 . Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  4. McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "Functions of the Trust". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Wellington: Ministry for Culture and Heritage. ISBN   978-0-478-18451-8 . Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  5. "Te Waimate Mission House". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand . Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  6. "Langlois-Eteveneaux House (Former)". Register of Historic Places. Heritage New Zealand . Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  7. "New Zealand Historic Places Trust becomes Heritage NZ". Ministry for Culture and Heritage. 7 October 2019. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  8. "Introduction to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga". Heritage New Zealand. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  9. "About the List". New Zealand Historic Places Trust. Archived from the original on 30 August 2012. Retrieved 18 February 2020.
  10. "Heritage Lost Canterbury Earthquakes". New Zealand Historic Places Trust. Archived from the original on 25 June 2013. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  11. "Māori Heritage Council on the Historic Places Trust website". Archived from the original on 27 May 2013. Retrieved 26 April 2009.