Hermann Poppelbaum

Last updated

Hermann Poppelbaum Dr. Phil. (1891–1979) was an anthropologist, psychologist, philosopher, anthroposophist, teacher and author.

An anthropologist is a person engaged in the practice of anthropology. Anthropology is the study of various aspects of humans within past and present societies. Social anthropology, cultural anthropology, and philosophical anthropology study the norms and values of societies. Linguistic anthropology studies how language affects social life, while economic anthropology studies human economic behavior. Biological (physical), forensic, and medical anthropology study the biological development of humans, the application of biological anthropology in a legal setting, and the study of diseases and their impacts on humans over time, respectively.

Psychologist professional who evaluates, diagnoses, treats, and studies behavior and mental processes

A psychologist studies normal and abnormal mental states, cognitive, emotional, and social processes and behavior by observing, interpreting, and recording how individuals relate to one another and to their environments. To become a psychologist, a person often completes a graduate university degree in psychology, but in most jurisdictions, members of other behavioral professions can also evaluate, diagnose, treat, and study mental processes.

Philosopher person with an extensive knowledge of philosophy

A philosopher is someone who practices philosophy, which involves rational inquiry into areas that are outside either theology or science. The term "philosopher" comes from the Ancient Greek, φιλόσοφος (philosophos), meaning "lover of wisdom". The coining of the term has been attributed to the Greek thinker Pythagoras.

Contents

Life

Dr. Poppelbaum was well known in both Germany and England as an expert on the works of the Austrian philosopher Rudolf Steiner (1861–1925). [1] Dr. Poppelbaum was a Visiting Lecturer in anthropology and psychology at Alfred University near Rochester, NY. [2]

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Rudolf Steiner Austrian esotericist

Rudolf Joseph Lorenz Steiner was an Austrian philosopher, social reformer, architect, and esotericist. Steiner gained initial recognition at the end of the nineteenth century as a literary critic and published philosophical works including The Philosophy of Freedom. At the beginning of the twentieth century he founded an esoteric spiritual movement, anthroposophy, with roots in German idealist philosophy and theosophy; other influences include Goethean science and Rosicrucianism.

In 1963, shortly before the death of Guenther Wachsmuth, the Executive Council at the Goetheanum announced the formation of the “Section for Nutrition and Agriculture” to be led by Gerhard Schmidt. The remainder of the Natural Science Section was then headed by Poppelbaum. [3]

Goetheanum world center for the anthroposophical movement, including performance halls, in Dornach, Switzerland

The Goetheanum, located in Dornach, in the canton of Solothurn, Switzerland, is the world center for the anthroposophical movement. The building was designed by Rudolf Steiner and named after Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It includes two performance halls, gallery and lecture spaces, a library, a bookstore, and administrative spaces for the Anthroposophical Society; neighboring buildings house the society's research and educational facilities. Conferences focusing on themes of general interest or directed toward teachers, farmers, doctors, therapists, and other professionals are held at the center throughout the year.

Works

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

See also

German National Library central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal Republic of Germany

The German National Library is the central archival library and national bibliographic centre for the Federal Republic of Germany. Its task is to collect, permanently archive, comprehensively document and record bibliographically all German and German-language publications since 1913, foreign publications about Germany, translations of German works, and the works of German-speaking emigrants published abroad between 1933 and 1945, and to make them available to the public. The German National Library maintains co-operative external relations on a national and international level. For example, it is the leading partner in developing and maintaining bibliographic rules and standards in Germany and plays a significant role in the development of international library standards. The cooperation with publishers has been regulated by law since 1935 for the Deutsche Bücherei Leipzig and since 1969 for the Deutsche Bibliothek Frankfurt.

Related Research Articles

Anthroposophy philosophy founded by Rudolf Steiner

Anthroposophy is a philosophy founded by the 19th century esotericist Rudolf Steiner that postulates the existence of an objective, intellectually comprehensible spiritual world, accessible to human experience. Followers of anthroposophy aim to develop mental faculties of spiritual discovery through a mode of thought independent of sensory experience. They also aim to present their ideas in a manner verifiable by rational discourse and specifically seek a precision and clarity in studying the spiritual world mirroring that obtained by natural historians in investigations of the physical world.

The General Anthroposophical Society is an "association of people whose will it is to nurture the life of the soul, both in the individual and in human society, on the basis of a true knowledge of the spiritual world." As an organization, it is dedicated to supporting the community of those interested in the inner path of schooling known as anthroposophy, developed by Rudolf Steiner.

Eurythmy expressive movement art associated with Anthroposophy

Eurythmy is an expressive movement art originated by Rudolf Steiner in conjunction with Marie von Sivers in the early 20th century. Primarily a performance art, it is also used in education, especially in Waldorf schools, and – as part of anthroposophic medicine – for claimed therapeutic purposes.

Karl König was an Austrian paediatrician who founded the Camphill Movement, an international movement of therapeutic intentional communities for those with special needs or disabilities.

Sergei Olegovich Prokofieff was a Russian anthroposophist. He was the grandson of the composer Sergei Prokofiev and his first wife Lina Prokofiev, and the son of Oleg Prokofiev and his first wife Sofia Korovina. Born in Moscow, he studied fine arts and painting at the Moscow School of Art. He encountered anthroposophy in his youth, and soon made the decision to devote his life to it.

Ehrenfried Pfeiffer was a German scientist, soil scientist, leading advocate of biodynamic agriculture, anthroposophist and student of Rudolf Steiner.

Anthroposophic pharmacy is the discipline related to conceiving, developing and producing medicinal products according to the anthroposophic understanding of man, nature, substance and pharmaceutical processing. One of the most characteristic features of anthroposophic medicine is the attempt to describe health and natural medicine in scientific as well as in spiritual terms. Anthroposophic pharmacy utilises vegetable, mineral and animal materials, manufactured according to particular principles and is sometimes potentised.

The word psychosophy has etymological roots in the Greek words ψυχή (psychē) and σοφίᾱ (sophiā), which are often interpreted as "soul" and "wisdom", respectively. It was used in a wide variety of contexts from 1743 to the 1920s but fell out of use in the 20th century.

Hermann Beckh was a pioneering German Tibetologist and prominent promoter of anthroposophy.

Karl Ballmer was a Swiss painter, anthroposophical philosopher, and writer.

Elisabeth Vreede was a Dutch mathematician, astronomer and Anthroposophist.

Rudolf Hauschka was an Austrian chemist, author, inventor, entrepreneur and anthroposophist.

Walther Cloos was a pharmacist, alchemist, Anthroposophist, lecturer, researcher, inventor, author and pioneer in anthroposophical pharmacy.

Hans Krüger was a pharmacist, anthroposophist, botanist, lecturer and researcher.

Wilhelm Pelikan was a chemist, anthroposophist, pharmacist, gardener and anthroposophical medicine practitioner.

Oskar Schmiedel was a pharmacist, anthroposophist, therapist, Goethean scientist and theosophist.

Biography work is essentially about interest in the human being and the great mystery of existence we call human life. It is an active practice for developing self-knowledge. It is a search for meaning out of which may arise greater social understanding—deeper, genuine interest in one's fellow man. Biography work is founded upon the vast work of Rudolf Steiner, collectively called spiritual science or anthroposophy--"wisdom or knowledge of the human being." Anthroposophy is often described as a path from the spiritual in the human being to the spiritual in the world or cosmos. A profound relationship exists between the cosmos or macrocosm and the human being as microcosm. Indeed, anthroposophy suggests the human being is a microcosm of the macrocosm. Yet, biography work works directly with physical existence, life on earth, which itself speaks volumes, if we will but "learn to read the text" of the individual experience, as well as that of the archetype. The human being is a bridge then: on the one hand, embedded in the earth, directed by the rhythms of nature, the seasons, night and day, etc.; and, on the other hand, belonging to the spiritual world. "The only real hope of people today is probably a renewal of certainty that we are rooted in the earth, and at the same time in the cosmos," as so beautifully described by Vaclav Havel.

Wilhelm Rath was a German writer, translator, bio-dynamic farmer and anthroposophist. He is best known for his research and translations of certain medieval mystics, notably the Friend of God from the Oberland, Bernard Silvestris, Alanus ab Insulis and John of Hildesheim.

Johannes Tautz (30 September 1914 in Koblenz am Rhein to 13 March 2008 in Dortmund, was a Historian, Religious scholar, Anthroposophist, Author and Waldorf teacher. He concerned himself with a better understanding of National Socialism and with questions of education in the twentieth century.

References