Hermes (missile)

Last updated

Hermes
Army-2020-169.JPG
Type Air-to-surface
Surface-to-surface missile
Land-attack missile
Anti-tank guided missile
Surface-to-air missile
Place of originRussia
Service history
In service2016-present
Wars Syrian Civil War [1]
Production history
Manufacturer KBP Instrument Design Bureau [2]
Specifications
Mass130 kg
Length3500 mm
Diameterbooster stage = 170 mm,
sustainer stage = 130 mm
WarheadHigh Explosive Fragmentation

Engine Solid-fuel rocket
Operational
range
max. range 20 km (Hermes-A)
30 km (Hermes-K) , 100 km two stages
Maximum speed 1300 m/s
Guidance
system
target area: radio-command guidance, terminal path: semi-active laser guidance, infrared guidance
Launch
platform
Rotary and fixed-wing platforms, unmanned combat aerial vehicles, tripods, ships, and ground vehicles
KBP Tula Hermes Missile MAKS2009.jpg

Hermes (Russian : Гермес) [3] [4] [5] is a family of modularly-designed guided missiles developed in Russia by the KBP Instrument Design Bureau. Capable of being fired from aerial (Hermes-A), land based (Hermes) and naval (Hermes-K) platforms, the Hermes system features a multistage rocket missile with a high-powered booster, and fire-and-forget capability with laser guidance and infrared homing. [6] It is designed to engage single and multiple targets (including tanks and other AFVs, fortifications of various types, naval surface targets and high-speed flying vehicles) with single or volley fire at ranges of up to 100 km and can track and destroy over-the-horizon targets. [7]

Contents

Hermes-A is used by Kamov Ka-52K helicopter and by Pantsir-ME CIWS.[ citation needed ]

Parameters

Variants

See also

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References

  1. "Russia to test new anti-tank guided missiles in Syria". www.rbth.com. 28 October 2016.
  2. Hermes Archived 2012-03-04 at the Wayback Machine .
  3. Sam, Benton (23 April 2017). "30 Russian weapons worrying the world".
  4. "Ancile". www.deagel.com.
  5. "Ancile". www.deagel.com.
  6. Litovkin, Nikolai (28 October 2016). "Russia to test new anti-tank guided missiles in Syria".
  7. Комплекс управляемого вооружения «ГЕРМЕС» (in Russian). ГУП «Конструкторское бюро приборостроения». Archived from the original on 27 March 2012. Retrieved 16 October 2009.
  8. "Противотанковый ракетный комплекс Гермес - Ракетная техника". rbase.new-factoria.ru. Archived from the original on 19 September 2009. Retrieved 13 December 2013.