Hewritt Dixon

Last updated
Hewritt Dixon
No. 30, 35
Position: Running back
Personal information
Born:(1940-01-08)January 8, 1940
LaCrosse, Florida
Died:November 24, 1992(1992-11-24) (aged 52)
Los Angeles, California
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:230 lb (104 kg)
Career information
College: Florida A&M
NFL Draft: 1963  / Round: 11 / Pick: 151
AFL Draft: 1963  / Round: 8 / Pick: 60
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Hewritt Frederick Dixon, Jr. (January 8, 1940 November 24, 1992) was a professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the American Football League's Denver Broncos and Oakland Raiders, and one season for the Raiders in the National Football League. He was an AFL All-Star in 1966, 1967, and 1968, and an NFL Pro Bowler in 1970. Dixon was born in LaCrosse, Florida and died in Los Angeles, California on November 24, 1992 of cancer. [1]

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