Hi Bell

Last updated
Hi Bell
HiBellGoudeycard.jpg
Pitcher
Born:(1897-07-16)July 16, 1897
Mt. Sherman, Kentucky
Died: June 7, 1949(1949-06-07) (aged 51)
Glendale, California
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 16, 1924, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
August 23, 1934, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 32–34
Earned run average 3.69
Strikeouts 191
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Herman S. "Hi" Bell (July 16, 1897 – June 7, 1949) was an American professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Giants. For his career, he compiled a 32–34 record in 221 appearances, most as a relief pitcher, with a 3.69 earned run average and 191 strikeouts. Bell was a member of three National League pennant winners (1926, 1930 & 1933), winning two World Series with the 1926 Cardinals and the 1933 Giants. In World Series play, he recorded no decisions in three appearances, with a 4.50 earned run average and 1 strikeout. On July 19, 1924, Bell became the last pitcher in Major League history to start and win both ends of a double header.

Bell died from a coronary occlusion in 1949 at age 51 and is buried at Calvary Cemetery in Los Angeles.

See also

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