Hidalgo County, Texas

Last updated
Hidalgo County, Texas
County
County of Hidalgo
Hidalgo County Courthouse.jpg
The Hidalgo County Courthouse at Edinburg in 2002
Flag of Hidalgo County, Texas.png
Flag
Seal of Hidalgo County, Texas.png
Seal
Map of Texas highlighting Hidalgo County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Texas
Map of USA TX.svg
Texas's location within the U.S.
Founded1852
Named for Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla
Seat Edinburg
Largest city McAllen
Area
  Total1,583 sq mi (4,100 km2)
  Land1,571 sq mi (4,069 km2)
  Water12 sq mi (31 km2), 0.8%
Population
  (2017)860,661
  Density493/sq mi (190/km2)
Congressional districts 15th, 28th, 34th
Time zone Central: UTC−6/−5
Website www.co.hidalgo.tx.us

Hidalgo County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. The county seat is Edinburg [1] and the largest city is McAllen. The county is named for Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, the priest who raised the call for Mexico's independence from Spain. [2] It is located in the Rio Grande Valley of South Texas and is one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States. As of the 2017 census, the population was 860,661, [3] making it the eighth-most populous county in Texas.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Texas State of the United States of America

Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas shares borders with the U.S. states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Contents

Hidalgo County is designated by the U.S. Census Bureau as the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area, which itself is part of the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission-Rio Grande City Combined Statistical Area with neighboring Starr County.

Rio Grande City, Texas City in Texas, United States

Rio Grande City is a city in and the county seat of Starr County, Texas. The population was 13,834 at the 2010 census. The city is 41 miles (66 km) west of McAllen. The city also holds the March record high for the United States at 108 degrees Fahrenheit. The city is connected to Camargo, Tamaulipas, via the Rio Grande City–Camargo International Bridge.

Starr County, Texas County in the United States

Starr County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 60,968. Its county seat is Rio Grande City. The county was created in 1848. It is named for James Harper Starr, who served as Secretary of the Treasury of the Republic of Texas.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,583 square miles (4,100 km2), of which 1,571 square miles (4,070 km2) are land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (0.8%) are covered by water. [4] The northern part of the county has sandy and light loamy soils over deep reddish or mottled, clayey subsoils. In some areas, limestone lies within 40 inches of the surface. The southern part of the county has moderately deep to deep loamy surfaces over clayey subsoils. Along the Rio Grande, brown to red clays occur. Hidalgo County is in the South Texas Plains vegetation area, which features grasses, mesquite, live oaks, and chaparral. Native plants, reduced in recent years by extensive farming, include chapote, guayacan, ebony, huisache, brasil, and yucca.

Tamaulipan mezquital

The Tamaulipan mezquital ecoregion, in the deserts and xeric shrublands biome, is located in the southern United States and northeastern Mexico. It covers an area of 141,500 km2 (54,600 sq mi), encompassing a portion of the Gulf Coastal Plain in southern Texas, northern Tamaulipas, northeastern Coahuila, and part of Nuevo León.

<i>Diospyros texana</i> species of plant

Diospyros texana is a species of persimmon that is native to central, south and west Texas and southwest Oklahoma in the United States, and eastern Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas in northeastern Mexico. Common names include Texas persimmon, Mexican persimmon and the more ambiguous "black persimmon". It is known in Spanish as chapote, chapote manzano, or chapote prieto, all of which are derived from the Nahuatl word tzapotl. That word also refers to several other fruit-bearing trees.

<i>Guaiacum angustifolium</i> species of plant

Guaiacum angustifolium is a species of flowering plant in the caltrop family, Zygophyllaceae. Common names include Texas guaiacum, Texas lignum-vitae, soapbush and huayacán. It is native to southern and western Texas in the United States and northern Mexico. The specific name is derived from the Latin words angustus, meaning "narrow," and folius, meaning "leaf."

In 1982, 91% of the land was in farms and ranches, with 52% of the farmland under cultivation and 85% irrigated; 51 to 60% of the county was considered prime farmland. The primary crops were sorghum, cotton, corn, and vegetables; Hidalgo County led Texas counties in the production of cabbage, onions, cantaloupes, carrots, and watermelons. The primary fruits and nuts grown in the county were grapefruit, oranges, and pecans. Cattle, milk cows, and hogs were the primary livestock products. Natural resources included caliche, sand, gravel, oil, and gas. Oil and gas production in 1982 totaled 98,487,211,000 cubic feet (2.7888472×109 m3) of gas-well gas, 139,995 barrels of crude oil, 1,101,666 barrels of condensate, and 15,784,000 cubic feet (447,000 m3) of casinghead gas. The climate is subtropical and subhumid. Temperatures range from an average low of 47 °F (8 °C) in January to an average high to 96 °F (36 °C) in July; the average annual temperature is 73 °F (23 °C). Rainfall averages 23 inches (580 mm) a year, and the growing season lasts for 320 days of the year. [5]

Major highways

Interstate 2 (I-2) is a partially completed Interstate Highway running through the Lower Rio Grande Valley of South Texas. It begins at the intersection of U.S. Highway 83 (US 83) and Business U.S. Highway 83 in Penitas and heads eastward before terminating at I-69E/US 77/US 83 in Harlingen. For its entire length, I-2 runs concurrently with US 83. I-2 also parallels Mexican Federal Highway 2, another major east–west route that traces the Mexico-U.S. border along the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. When completed, the western terminus will be the city of Laredo.

Interstate 69C highway in Texas

Interstate 69C (I-69C) is a north-south freeway running through South Texas. Once complete, the freeway will begin at Interstate 2/U.S. Highway 83 in Pharr and head northward before terminating at I-69W/US 59 in George West near I-37. For its entire length, I-69C shares its alignment with US 281.

U.S. Route 83 in Texas highway in Texas

U.S. Highway 83 (US 83), dedicated as the Texas Vietnam Veterans Memorial Highway, is a U.S. Highway in the U.S. state of Texas that begins at US 77 in Brownsville and follows the Rio Grande to Laredo, then heads north through Abilene to the Oklahoma border north of Perryton, the seat of Ochiltree County. It is the longest highway in Texas at a length of about 895 miles (1,440 km), besting the east–west I-10, which has a length of 879 miles (1,415 km).

Adjacent counties and municipalities

Brooks County, Texas County in the United States

Brooks County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,223. Its county seat is Falfurrias. The county is named for James Abijah Brooks, a Texas Ranger and legislator.

Kenedy County, Texas County in the United States

Kenedy County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 416. It is the third-least populous county in Texas and fourth-least populous in the United States. Its county seat is Sarita. The county was created in 1921 from parts of Hidalgo and Willacy counties and is named for Mifflin Kenedy, an early area rancher and steamboat operator.

Willacy County, Texas County in the United States

Willacy County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 22,134. Its county seat is Raymondville. The county was created in 1911 and organized the next year.

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1860 1,182
1870 2,387101.9%
1880 4,34782.1%
1890 6,53450.3%
1900 6,8374.6%
1910 13,728100.8%
1920 38,110177.6%
1930 77,004102.1%
1940 106,05937.7%
1950 160,44651.3%
1960 180,90412.8%
1970 181,5350.3%
1980 283,22956.0%
1990 383,54535.4%
2000 569,46348.5%
2010 774,76936.1%
Est. 2017860,661 [6] 11.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]
1850–2010 [8] 2010–2014 [3]

2015 Texas Population Estimate Program

As of the 2015 Texas Population Estimate Program, the population of the county was 841,667, non-Hispanic whites 62,232 (7.4%). Black Americans 2,973 (0.3%). Other non-Hispanic 11,106 (1.3%). Hispanics and Latinos (of any race) 765,356 (90.9%). [9]

2010 Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 774,769 people residing in the county. 88.0% were White, 1.0% Asian, 0.6% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 8.8% of some other race and 1.3% of two or more races. 90.6% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

There were 216,471 households, and 179,668 families residing in the county. The population density was 363 people per square mile (140/km²). There were 248,287 housing units at an average density of 123 per square mile (47/km²). There were 216,471 households out of which 54.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.00% were married couples living together, 18.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.0% were non-families. 14.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.55 and the average family size was 3.94.

In the county, the population was spread out with 34.7% under the age of 18, 10.7% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28.3 years. For every 100 females there were 94.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,134, and the median income for a family was $31,760. Males had a median income of $22,635 versus $17,526 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,130. About 32.60% of families and 35.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 47.4% of those under age 18 and 29.8% of those age 65 or over. The county's per-capita income makes it one of the poorest counties in the United States. In 2009, it was tied with Bronx County, New York for "the greatest share of people receiving food stamps: 29 percent." [10]

Las Milpas, previously unincorporated, was annexed by Pharr in 1987. [11]

Metropolitan Statistical Area

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Hidalgo County as the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area. [12] The United States Census Bureau ranked the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area as the 70th most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012. [13]

The Office of Management and Budget has further designated the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX Metropolitan Statistical Area as a component of the more extensive McAllen-Edinburg, TX Combined Statistical Area, [12] the 60th most populous combined statistical area and the 67th most populous primary statistical area of the United States as of July 1, 2012. [13] [14]

Government and politics

Hidalgo County tends to vote for the Democratic Party, although there is representation of the Republican Party in some of the offices that affect the county. Hidalgo County is represented by Vicente González of Texas's 15th congressional district , Henry Cuellar of Texas's 28th congressional district and Filemon Vela Jr. of Texas's 34th congressional district . In the 2012 presidential election, 70.4% of the voters voted for Barack Obama while 28.6% voted for Mitt Romney. The last time Hidalgo County voted Republican was in the 1972 presidential election when Richard Nixon won over 55% of the votes.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results [15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 27.9% 48,64268.1%118,8094.0% 6,957
2012 28.6% 39,86570.3%97,9691.1% 1,488
2008 30.3% 39,66868.9%90,2610.8% 1,043
2004 44.8% 50,93154.9%62,3690.3% 383
2000 37.9% 38,30160.8%61,3901.4% 1,359
1996 28.8% 24,43766.5%56,3354.7% 3,955
1992 30.6% 26,97658.1%51,20511.3% 9,979
1988 34.9% 29,24664.8%54,3300.4% 294
1984 44.1% 35,05955.6%44,1470.3% 226
1980 41.8% 25,80856.0%34,5422.2% 1,367
1976 35.2% 19,19964.2%35,0210.7% 373
1972 55.2%22,92044.3% 18,3660.5% 213
1968 39.0% 14,45554.1%20,0876.9% 2,569
1964 34.3% 11,56365.5%22,1100.3% 83
1960 42.1% 13,62857.6%18,6630.4% 115
1956 56.9%13,27042.0% 9,8041.1% 253
1952 62.2%15,30337.6% 9,2510.2% 48
1948 38.8% 6,22059.5%9,5261.7% 272
1944 33.4% 4,08059.3%7,2507.4% 904
1940 39.0% 4,78760.8%7,4710.2% 27
1936 29.5% 2,96267.5%6,7823.1% 309
1932 23.2% 2,96975.8%9,6950.9% 120
1928 51.4%4,28548.4% 4,0340.2% 16
1924 20.4% 99675.2%3,6624.4% 214
1920 31.1% 1,10867.7%2,4091.2% 42
1916 15.7% 26082.3%1,3642.0% 33
1912 2.8% 3986.6%1,20310.6% 147

County services

The Hidalgo County Sheriff's Office operates jail facilities and is the primary provider of law enforcement services to the unincorporated areas of the county.

County government

PositionNameParty
 County Judge Richard Cortez Democratic
 Commissioner, Precinct 1David Fuentes Democratic
 Commissioner, Precinct 2Eduardo "Eddie" Cantu Democratic
 Commissioner, Precinct 3Joe M. Flores Democratic
 Commissioner, Precinct 4Ellie Torres Democratic
 Criminal District AttorneyRicardo Rodriguez Democratic
 District ClerkLaura Hinojosa Democratic
 County ClerkArturo Guajardo, Jr. Democratic
 Sheriff J.E. "Eddie" Guerra Democratic
 Tax Assessor-CollectorPablo "Paul" Villarreal Democratic
 TreasurerLita Leo Democratic
 Constable, Precinct 1Celestino Avila, Jr. Democratic
 Constable, Precinct 2Martin Cantu Democratic
 Constable, Precinct 3Lazaro Gallardo, Jr. Democratic
 Constable, Precinct 4Atanacio "J.R." Gaitan Democratic
 Constable, Precinct 5Danny Marichalar Democratic

Education

The following school districts serve Hidalgo County:

In addition, the county is served by the multi-county South Texas Independent School District. The Catholic Diocese of Brownsville operates three PK-8th Grade schools, two lower-level elementary schools and two high schools.

The Edinburg campus of the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley (formerly University of Texas-Pan American) is located in Hidalgo County. The Pecan, Mid-Valley, Technology, and Nursing & Allied Health campuses of South Texas College are also located in Hidalgo County. [16]

Media

Newspapers

Radio stations

Magazine

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated places

See also

Related Research Articles

Alamo, Texas City in Texas

Alamo, located in the Rio Grande Valley in what is nicknamed the "Land of Two Summers", is a city in the irrigated area of southern Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. Known as the "Refuge to the Valley", it is located in an area of abundant vegetable farming and citrus groves, and is a noted winter resort/retirement town near the Mexico-U.S. border. Alamo is one of the Rio Grande Valley's gateways to Mexico, via U.S. Route 281 and Nuevo Progreso, Tamaulipas, as well as a gateway to the Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge. Alamo's population was 18,353 at the 2010 census and an estimated 19,220 in 2016.

Cuevitas, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

Cuevitas is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population was 40 at the 2010 United States Census. Rated the poorest community in Texas, it is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Donna, Texas City in Texas

Donna is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 15,798 at the 2010 census.

Edinburg, Texas City in Texas

Edinburg is a city in and the county seat of Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 74,569 as of the 2010 census, and in 2016 the estimated population was 87,650.

Granjeno, Texas City in Texas, United States

Granjeno is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 293 at the 2010 census. The city sits on the banks of the Rio Grande, near the border with Mexico. Its name comes from the Granjeno tree or spiny hackberry.

Hidalgo, Texas City in Texas

Hidalgo is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 11,198 at the 2010 census, and in 2016 the estimated population was 13,831.

Llano Grande, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

Llano Grande is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population was 3,008 at the 2010 United States Census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area. Llano Grade means "Big Plain" in Spanish. Nearby Llano Grande State Park is popular with bird watchers and the supposed site of many ghost appearances, including the ghosts of historic figures in Texas history.

Los Ebanos, Hidalgo County, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

Los Ebanos is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population was 335 at the 2010 United States Census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is named after the Texas Ebony that anchors the Los Ebanos Ferry.

McAllen, Texas City in Texas, United States

McAllen is the largest city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States, and the 22nd-most populous city in Texas. It is located at the southern tip of the state in the Rio Grande Valley. The city limits extend south to the Rio Grande, across from the Mexican city of Reynosa, and McAllen is about 70 mi (110 km) west of the Gulf of Mexico. As of 2017, McAllen’s population was estimated to be 142,696. It is the fifth-most populous metropolitan area in the state of Texas, and the binational Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan area counts a population of nearly 1.52 million.

Mercedes, Texas City in Texas

Mercedes is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 15,570 at the 2010 census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission and Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan areas.

Murillo, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

Murillo, previously recorded as Nurillo, is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 7,344 at the 2010 census, up from 5,056 at the 2000 census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Palmview, Texas City in Texas

Palmview is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population is 5,792 as of the 2017 United States Census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission and Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan areas.

Peñitas, Texas City in Texas

Peñitas is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 4,403 at the 2010 census, up from 1,167 at the 2000 census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission and Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan areas.

Pharr, Texas City in Texas

Pharr is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 70,400, and in 2016 the estimated population was 77,320. Pharr is connected by bridge to the Mexican city of Reynosa, Tamaulipas. Pharr is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission and Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan areas.

Progreso Lakes, Texas City in Texas

Progreso Lakes is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population was 240 at the 2010 United States Census. The city, incorporated in 1979, is centered on Lion and Moon Lakes, two resacas or ox-bow lakes.

San Carlos, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

San Carlos is a community and census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas. The population was 3,130 at the 2010 United States Census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area.

San Juan, Texas City in Texas

San Juan is a city in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 33,856, up from 26,229 in 2000. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission and Reynosa–McAllen metropolitan areas.

Linn, Texas Census-designated place in Texas

Linn, formerly San Manuel-Linn, is an unincorporated area and census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. The population was 801 at the 2010 census, down from 958 at the 2000 census. It is part of the McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area.

McAllen–Edinburg–Mission metropolitan area Metropolitan area in Texas, United States

The McAllen–Edinburg–Mission Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of one county – Hidalgo – in the Rio Grande Valley region of South Texas, anchored by the cities of McAllen, Edinburg, Pharr and Mission. It is ranked the fifth most populated metropolitan area in the state of Texas. It is also part of the transnational metropolitan area of Reynosa–McAllen.

Hargill is a census-designated place (CDP) in Hidalgo County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, it had a population of 877.

References

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  2. Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 156.
  3. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 11, 2011. Retrieved December 17, 2013.
  4. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 30, 2015.
  5. "Hidalgo County". Texas Almanac. Retrieved Nov 23, 2011.
  6. "American FactFinder" . Retrieved March 23, 2018.
  7. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved April 30, 2015.
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  9. Estimates of the Population by Age, Sex, and Race/Ethnicity for July 1, 2015 for State of Texas (PDF), July 15, 2015, retrieved June 8, 2017
  10. Bloch, Matthew; Jason DeParle; Matthew Ericson; Robert Gebeloff (November 28, 2009). "Food Stamp Usage Across the Country". New York Times. Retrieved November 28, 2009.
  11. "LAS MILPAS, TX." Handbook of Texas. Retrieved on September 27, 2013.
  12. 1 2 "OMB Bulletin No. 13-01: Revised Delineations of Metropolitan Statistical Areas, Micropolitan Statistical Areas, and Combined Statistical Areas, and Guidance on Uses of the Delineations of These Areas" (PDF). United States Office of Management and Budget. February 28, 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 19, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  13. 1 2 "Table 1. Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on 2013-04-01. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  14. "Table 2. Annual Estimates of the Population of Combined Statistical Areas: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". 2012 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2013. Archived from the original (CSV) on May 17, 2013. Retrieved March 20, 2013.
  15. Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  16. "About South Texas College". southtexascollege.edu. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  17. Garza, Alicia A. "McCook, Texas". The Handbook of Texas. Retrieved July 14, 2009.

Coordinates: 26°24′N98°11′W / 26.40°N 98.18°W / 26.40; -98.18