Hishida Shunsō

Last updated
Hishida Shunsō
Hishida Shunso.jpg
Hishida Shunsō
Born
Hishida Miyoji

(1874-09-21)September 21, 1874
DiedSeptember 16, 1911(1911-09-16) (aged 36)
Tokyo, Japan
Nationality Japanese
Known for Painter
Movement Nihonga
Awards Order of Culture
Fallen Leaves. Important Cultural Property. (1909) Hishida Shunso 001.jpg
Fallen Leaves. Important Cultural Property. (1909)
Kuroki Neko Kuroki Neko by Hishida Shunso.jpg
Kuroki Neko

Hishida Shunsō (菱田 春草, September 21, 1874 – September 16, 1911) was the pseudonym of a Japanese painter from the Meiji period. One of Okakura Tenshin's pupils along with Yokoyama Taikan and Shimomura Kanzan, he played a role in the Meiji era innovation of Nihonga . His real name was Hishida Miyoji. He was also known for his numerous paintings of cats.

Contents

Biography

Shunsō was born in 1874 in what is now part of Iida city in Nagano Prefecture. In 1889 he moved to Tokyo to study under Kanō school artist Yuki Masaaki (1834–1904). The following year, he enrolled at the Tōkyō Bijutsu Gakkō (the forerunner of the Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music). Shunsō was one year junior to his colleagues Yokoyama Taikan and Shimomura Kanzan; his teacher was Hashimoto Gahō. Shunsō, Taikan and Kanzan were heavily influenced by Okakura Tenshin and Ernest Fenollosa during their time at the Tōkyō Bijutsu Gakkō.

After graduation, Shunsō was commissioned by the Imperial Household Museum (now the Tokyo National Museum) to copy important religious paintings at Buddhist temples in Kyoto and Nara, and he also became a teacher at the Tōkyō Bijutsu Gakkō (present-day Tokyo University of the Arts)). In 1898, he joined Okakura Tenshin in establishing the Nihon Bijutsuin . From 1903-1905, he traveled extensively overseas, holding exhibitions of his works in India, the United States and in Europe.

After his return to Japan, Shunsō successfully competed in many national exhibitions in Japan, including the government-sponsored Bunten.

Shunsō developed a new painting method, derogatorily named by his contemporaries as moro-tai (vague style). This new method used a gradation of colors to replace the line drawings that characterized traditional Japanese-style painting. This new style, however, gained little support from Shunsō's contemporaries and was severely criticized by art critics. Shunsō came to realize that while moro-tai was effective in depicting such scenes as morning mist and evening glow, its color gradation technique proved good only for those limited motifs. Shunsō began integrating his original moro-tai with line drawing to overcome this disadvantage, and his later works exhibit a new style which came to typify the Nihonga genre, distinguishing it from the more restrictive styles of traditional Japanese-style painting.

In his final years, Shunsō suffered from renal, or kidney disease. Driven by fear of blindness, Shunsō painted frantically whenever his illness entered a state of remission. In 1909, his work Ochiba won the highest award at the third Bunten Exhibition. It is now designated an Important Cultural Property by the Japanese government's Agency for Cultural Affairs and is now in the collection of the Eisei Bunko Museum, Tokyo. His work Black Cat (1910) has also been designated an Important Cultural Property.

A large retrospective exhibition of his work was held at the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo’s Art Museum Special Gallery in 2014. [1]

Philately

One of Hishida Shunsō's works has been selected as the subject of a commemorative postage stamps by the Japanese government:

In the year 1951, Hishida Shunsō himself was the subject of a commemorative postage stamp under the Cultural Leaders Series by Japan Post.

Famous works

Related Research Articles

Okakura Kakuzō Japanese scholar, author of The Book of Tea

Okakura Kakuzō was a Japanese scholar who contributed to the development of arts in Japan. Outside Japan, he is chiefly remembered today as the author of The Book of Tea.

Kawai Gyokudō Japanese artist

Kawai Gyokudō was the pseudonym of a Japanese painter in the nihonga school, active from Meiji through Shōwa period Japan. His real name was Kawai Yoshisaburō.

Hashimoto Gahō Japanese artist

Hashimoto Gahō was a Japanese painter, one of the last to paint in the style of the Kanō school.

Tokyo University of the Arts Higher education institution in Tokyo Prefecture, Japan

Tokyo University of the Arts or Geidai (芸大) is one of the most prestigious art school in Japan. Located in Ueno Park, it also has facilities in Toride, Ibaraki, Yokohama, Kanagawa, and Kitasenju and Adachi, Tokyo. The university owns two halls of residence: one in Adachi, Tokyo, and the other in Matsudo, Chiba.

Yukihiko Yasuda Japanese painter

Yukihiko Yasuda was the pseudonym of a major figure in Taishō and early Shōwa period Japanese painting, and is regarded as one of the founders of the Japanese painting technique of nihonga. His real name was Yasuda Shinzaburō.

Yokoyama Taikan Japanese painter

Yokoyama Taikan was the pseudonym of a major figure in pre-World War II Japanese painting. He is notable for helping create the Japanese painting technique of Nihonga. His real name was Sakai Hidemaro.

Nihonga are Japanese paintings from about 1900 onwards that have been made in accordance with traditional Japanese artistic conventions, techniques and materials. While based on traditions over a thousand years old, the term was coined in the Meiji period of Imperial Japan, to distinguish such works from Western-style paintings or Yōga (洋画).

Kanzan Shimomura Japanese painter

Kanzan Shimomura was the pseudonym of a nihonga painter in Meiji through to the early Shōwa period Japan. His real name was Shimomura Seizaburō.

Gyoshū Hayami Japanese artist

Gyoshū Hayami was the pseudonym of a Japanese painter in the Nihonga style, active during the Taishō and Shōwa eras. His real name was Eiichi Maita.

Japan Art Academy

Japan Art Academy is the highest ranking artistic organization in Japan. The Academy discusses art-related issues, advises the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology on art-related issues, and promotes art (fine arts, music, literature, dance and drama though the annual Japan Art Academy Award , the premier art exhibition in Japan. As a legal entity, it is an extraordinary organ of the Agency for Cultural Affairs. Its headquarters is in Ueno Park, Tokyo.

<i>Yōga</i> style of paintings by Japanese artists, made in accordance with Western (European) traditional conventions, techniques and materials

Yōga is a style of paintings by Japanese artists, made in accordance with Western (European) traditional conventions, techniques and materials. The term was coined in the Meiji period, to distinguish such works from indigenous traditional Japanese paintings, or Nihonga (日本画).

Kiyokata Kaburagi Japanese artist

Kiyokata Kaburagi was the pseudonym of a Nihonga artist and the leading master of the bijin-ga genre in Taishō and Shōwa period Japan. His real name was Kaburagi Kenichi. Incidentally, although his name is universally transliterated as "Kaburagi" by western sources, Kaburagi himself used the pronunciation "Kaburaki".

Tsuchida Bakusen Japanese painter

Tsuchida Bakusen was the pseudonym of a Japanese painter in the Nihonga style, active during the Taishō and early Shōwa eras. His birth name was Tsuchida Kinji (土田金二).

Ryūsei Kishida Japanese painter

Ryūsei Kishida was a Japanese painter in Taishō and Shōwa period Japan. He is best known for his realistic yōga-style portraiture, but also for his nihonga paintings in the 1920s.

Narashige Koide Japanese painter and illustrator

Narashige Koide was a Japanese painter and illustrator, noted for his work in pioneering the Hanshinkan Modernism trend in yōga (Western-style) portraiture and nude painting in early 20th century Japanese painting.

Nihon Bijutsuin is a non-governmental artistic organization in Japan dedicated to Nihonga. The academy promotes the art of Nihonga through a biennial exhibition, the Inten Exhibition.

Kagaku Murakami Japanese artist

Murakami Kagaku was a Japanese painter and illustrator, noted for his numerous Buddhist subjects and advancement in the techniques of nihonga (Japanese-style) painting in the early 20th century.

Jin Goto Japanese artist

Jin Goto is a Japanese Nihonga and Picture book painter.

The Museum of Modern Art, Ibaraki

The Museum of Modern Art, Ibaraki opened on the shore of Lake Senba (千波湖) in Mito, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, in October 1988. The collection, numbering some 3,700 pieces as of October 2015, includes works by Manet, Monet, and Renoir, Gustave Courbet, Eugène Carrière, Camille Pissarro und Alfred Sisley as well as Yōga and Nihonga by artists including Tsuguharu Foujita, Heihachirō Fukuda, Taikan Yokoyama, Yukihiko Yasuda, Tetsugoro Yorozu, Kanzan Shimomura, Kenzo Okada, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Kiyokata Kaburagi, Kokei Kobayashi, Gyoshū Hayami, Hishida Shunsō, and Shikō Imamura.

Kimura Buzan

Kimura Buzan (木村武山) was a Japanese Nihonga painter associated with the Nihon Bijutsuin.

References

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Hishida Shunsō at Wikimedia Commons