Hobo–Dyer projection

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Comparison of the Hobo-Dyer projection and some cylindrical equal-area map projections with Tissot indicatrix, standard parallels and aspect ratio Tissot indicatrix world map cyl equal-area proj comparison.svg
Comparison of the Hobo–Dyer projection and some cylindrical equal-area map projections with Tissot indicatrix, standard parallels and aspect ratio
Hobo-Dyer projection of the world. Hobo-Dyer projection SW.jpg
Hobo–Dyer projection of the world.
The Hobo-Dyer cylindrical equal-area projection with Tissot's indicatrices of deformation Tissot indicatrix world map Hobo-Dyer equal-area proj.svg
The Hobo–Dyer cylindrical equal-area projection with Tissot's indicatrices of deformation

The Hobo–Dyer map projection is a cylindrical equal-area projection, with standard parallels (where there is no north-south nor east-west distortion) at 37.5° north and south of the equator. The map was commissioned in 2002 by Bob Abramms and Howard Bronstein of ODT Inc., and drafted by cartographer Mick Dyer, [1] as a modification of the 1910 Behrmann projection. The name Hobo–Dyer is derived from Bronstein and Abramms' first names (Howard and Bob) and Dyer's surname. [1]

Cylindrical equal-area projection

In cartography, the cylindrical equal-area projection is a family of cylindrical, equal-area map projections.

Behrmann projection

The Behrmann projection is a cylindrical map projection described by Walter Behrmann in 1910. It is a member of the cylindrical equal-area projection family. Members of the family differ by their standard parallels, which are parallels along which the projection has no distortion. In the case of the Behrmann projection, the standard parallels are 30°N and 30°S. The projection shares many characteristics with other members of the family such as the Lambert cylindrical equal-area projection, whose standard parallel is the equator, and the Gall–Peters projection, whose standard parallels are 45°N and 45°S. While equal-area, distortion of shape increases in the Behrmann projection according to distance from the standard parallels. This projection is not equidistant.

Contents

The original ODT map is printed on two sides, one side with north upwards and the other, south upwards. This, together with its equal-area presentation, is intended to present a different perspective compared with more common non-equal area, north-up maps. [1] This goal is similar to that of other equal-area projections (such as the Gall–Peters projection), but the Hobo-Dyer is billed by the publisher as "more visually satisfying". [2] To this end, the map stretches the low latitudes vertically less than Peters, but at the price of greater compression near the poles.

Gall–Peters projection specialization of a configurable equal-area map projection

The Gall–Peters projection is a rectangular map projection that maps all areas such that they have the correct sizes relative to each other. Like any equal-area projection, it achieves this goal by distorting most shapes. The projection is a particular example of the cylindrical equal-area projection with latitudes 45° north and south as the regions on the map that have no distortion.

In 2002, the Carter Center used the Hobo–Dyer projection in a map of its global locations that it circulated to mark its founder Jimmy Carter's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. [3]

Carter Center American nonprofit organization

The Carter Center is a nongovernmental, not-for-profit organization founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. He and his wife Rosalynn Carter partnered with Emory University just after his defeat in the 1980 U.S. Presidential elections. The center is located in a shared building adjacent to the Jimmy Carter Library and Museum on 37 acres (150,000 m2) of parkland, on the site of the razed neighborhood of Copenhill, two miles (3 km) from downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The library and museum are owned and operated by the United States National Archives and Records Administration, while the Center is governed by a Board of Trustees, consisting of business leaders, educators, former government officials, and philanthropists.

Jimmy Carter 39th president of the United States

James Earl Carter Jr. is an American politician and philanthropist who served as the 39th president of the United States from 1977 to 1981. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as a Georgia State Senator from 1963 to 1967 and as the 76th Governor of Georgia from 1971 to 1975. After his presidency, Carter has remained active in the private sector; in 2002, he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work in co-founding the Carter Center.

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See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "UMASS Mag". Archived from the original on December 27, 2005. Retrieved February 17, 2006.
  2. "Background on Hobo-Dyer Map" . Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  3. "President Carter's Nobel Prize: Presidential Peace Prize Means New Map Goes International" . Retrieved June 28, 2011.