Hoeyang County

Last updated
Hoeyang County

회양군
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Hoeyang-gun
   Revised Romanization Hoeyang-gun
NK-Gangwon-Hoeyang.png
Map of Kangwon showing the location of Hoeyang
Coordinates: 38°44′29.00″N127°37′21.00″E / 38.7413889°N 127.6225000°E / 38.7413889; 127.6225000 Coordinates: 38°44′29.00″N127°37′21.00″E / 38.7413889°N 127.6225000°E / 38.7413889; 127.6225000
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 23 ri
Area
  Total540 km2 (210 sq mi)
Population
 (1991 est.)
  Total100,893

Hoeyang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. It was established in a general reorganization of local government in 1952.

Contents

Geography

The county's area is primarily mountainous, with the Taebaek and Kwangju ranges both passing through the county. Two basins, the Hoeyang Basin and Changdo Basin, interrupt the rugged terrain. The highest point is Piryubong on Kŭmgangsan. The chief local stream is the Pukhan River, which flows south and east into South Korea. The climate is continental, with extremely cold winters.

Administrative divisions

Hoeyang county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 23 ri (villages):

  • Hoeyang-ŭp
  • Chŏngong-ri
  • Chŏnhang-ri
  • Hagyo-ri
  • Hyŏl-li
  • Kajŏng-ri
  • Kangdol-li
  • Kŭmch'ŏl-li
  • Kŭmgong-ri
  • Kwangjŏl-li
  • Kwirang-li
  • Majŏl-li
  • Obong-ri
  • Orang-ri
  • Pongp'o-ri
  • P'ochŏl-li
  • Ryongp'o-ri
  • Singye-ri
  • Sinmyŏng-ri
  • Sinp'yŏng-ri
  • Sŏndae-ri
  • Sop'ung-ri
  • Tonam-ri
  • Yuŭp-ri

Economy

The chief local industry is agriculture, although the terrain does not permit rice to be cultivated; instead, local crops include barley, wheat, oats, millet, maize, soybeans, and potatoes. Cattle are also raised. The maize-based yŏt candy from the district is widely known. Local mines work to extract the deposits of tungsten, barite, molybdenum, graphite, gold, silver, and lead found in the county.

Transportation

Hoeyang is served by roads, and also by the Kŭmgangsan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line of the Korean State Railway.

See also

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