Homer Peel

Last updated
Homer Peel
HomerPeelGoudeycard.jpg
Homer Peel 1934 Goudey baseball card
Outfielder
Born:(1902-10-10)October 10, 1902
Port Sullivan, Texas
Died: April 8, 1997(1997-04-08) (aged 94)
Shreveport, Louisiana
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
September 13, 1927, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
June 25, 1934, for the New York Giants
MLB statistics
Batting average .238
Home runs 2
Runs batted in 44
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Homer Hefner Peel (October 10, 1902 – April 8, 1997) was an American professional baseball player and manager during the first half of the 20th century. His career lasted for a quarter century (1923–42; 1946–50), including 21 years as an outfielder and four years as a non-playing manager. Peel appeared in 186 Major League Baseball games over five seasons (1927; 1929–30; 1933–34) for the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies and New York Giants. The native of Port Sullivan, Milam County, Texas, threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m)tall and weighed 170 pounds (77 kg). He served in the United States Navy during World War II. [1]

Peel batted only .238 with an even 100 hits, two home runs and 44 RBI during his Major League career. But he was a member of the 1933 World Series champion Giants, appearing in two games of the 1933 World Series. He was a defensive replacement in center field for Kiddo Davis in Game 2, and singled as a pinch hitter for Freddie Fitzsimmons in Game 3 off Earl Whitehill of the Washington Senators. [2]

In addition, Peel was one of the top players in minor league baseball during the 1920s and 1930s [3] He hit over .300 for more than a dozen seasons and was known as "the Ty Cobb of the Texas League", where hit batted .325 lifetime. [3] He also managed the Fort Worth Cats, Oklahoma City Indians and Shreveport Sports in the Texas circuit.

Peel died in Shreveport, Louisiana, at age 94.

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References

  1. "Baseball in Wartime – Those Who Served from A to Z". baseballinwartime.com. Retrieved July 10, 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. "Washington Senators 4, New York Giants 0". retrosheet.org. October 5, 1933. Retrieved July 10, 2016.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. 1 2 Homer Peel at the SABR Bio Project , by John F. Green, retrieved July 10, 2016