Honda CB500 Four

Last updated
CB500
Honda CB 500 K2 Four-001.jpg
Manufacturer Honda
Also calledHonda CB500 Four K model
Production1971–1978
1971–1973 (US)
Successor Honda CB550
Class Standard
Engine 498 cc (30.4 cu in), air-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, transverse inline-four
Bore / stroke 56 mm × 50.6 mm (2.20 in × 1.99 in)
Compression ratio 9:1
Top speed100 mph (160 km/h) [1]
Power 50 hp (37 kW) (claimed) [1]
Ignition type Electric start
Transmission 5-speed manual, chain final drive
Suspension Front: 35 mm telescopic forks
Rear: Twin shocks with adjustable pre-load
Brakes Single front 267 mm disc, rear drum
Tyres Front: 3.25×19"
Rear: 3.50×18"
Rake, trail 64°, 105 mm
Weight185 kg (408 lb) [2]  (dry)
Fuel capacity14 L (3.1 imp gal; 3.7 US gal)

The Honda CB500 Four is a standard 498 cc (30.4 cu in), air-cooled, 8-valve, SOHC, transverse inline-four motorcycle made by Honda from 1971 to 1978. [2] It was introduced at the London Racing and Sporting Motorcycle Show in February 1972, [3] and sold in the US market until 1973, replaced by the CB550 in the 1974 model year, while continuing in the European market until 1978. [2] The CB500 Four is styled like the CB750, but smaller and lighter, with a claimed of 50 bhp (37 kW) output and a top speed of 115 mph (185 km/h). [1] [3]

Like the earlier CB750, it has a single front hydraulic disc brake, rear drum brake, electric starter, and SOHC eight-valve engine. The four-into-four exhaust pipes echoed those of the CB750. Unlike the earlier dry sump CB750, the smaller bike has a wet sump engine. Also, the primary drives were different, the CB750 having a duplex chain, while the CB500 had a "Hy-Vo" Morse chain.

Reviewing the 1972 show models, UK monthly magazine Motorcycle Mechanics described the CB500 as "one of the 'show stealers'. Four cylinders, in-line across the frame, four carburettors and single overhead camshaft motor, coupled to a five-speed gearbox give this 500 cc machine the performance of a 650 twin cylinder bike." [3]

Several CB500 machines were entered in the Production TT races on the Isle of Man in the early 1970s. Bill Smith won the 1973 500 cc TT Production race (four laps) riding one, 8.2 seconds ahead of second place Stan Woods mounted on a Suzuki T500 two-stroke, twin. [4]

Related Research Articles

Honda CB750 Four cylinder engine motorcycle

The Honda CB750 is an air-cooled, transverse, in-line four-cylinder engine motorcycle made by Honda over several generations for year models 1969–2003 as well as 2007 with an upright or standard riding posture. It is often called the original Universal Japanese Motorcycle (UJM).

The Honda XR series is a range of four-stroke off-road motorcycles that were designed in Japan but assembled all over the world.

AJS British automobile and motorcycle manufacturer from 1909 to 1931

A. J. Stevens & Co. Ltd was a British automobile and motorcycle manufacturer in operation from 1909 to 1931. The company was founded by Joe Stevens in Wolverhampton, England. After the firm was sold, the name continued to be used by Matchless, Associated Motorcycles and Norton-Villiers on four-stroke motorcycles till 1969, and since the name's resale in 1974, on lightweight, two-stroke scramblers and today on small-capacity roadsters and cruisers. The company held 117 motorcycle world records.

Kawasaki Z650

The Kawasaki Z650 was produced as a 652 cc (39.8 cu in) standard motorcycle by Kawasaki from 1976 until 1983. It had a four-cylinder four-stroke, DOHC, air-cooled, wet sump engine positioned across the frame with two valves per cylinder and a five-speed gearbox. Designed as a middleweight version of the Kawasaki Z900, the similar-styling had "an attenuated version of the traditional Kawasaki tail fairing". It competed in the market against the smaller SOHC Honda CB650. The Z650 was the epitome of the "Universal Japanese Motorcycle" (UJM).

Yamaha XS 650 Yamaha motorcycle

The Yamaha XS650 is a mid-size motorcycle made by Yamaha Motor Company. The standard model was introduced in October 1969,and produced through 1979. The "Special" cruiser model was introduced in 1978 and produced through 1985. The XS650 began with the 1955 Hosk SOHC 500 twin. After about 10 years of producing 500 twin, Hosk engineers designed a 650 cc twin. Later the Hosk company was acquired by Showa Corporation, and in 1960 Yamaha had bought Showa with Hosk's early design of 650 cc twin.

Honda CB400F

The Honda CB400F is a motorcycle produced by Honda from 1975 to 1977. It first appeared at the 1974 Cologne motorcycle show, Intermot, and was dropped from the Honda range in 1978. It had an air-cooled, transverse-mounted 408 cc (24.9 cu in) inline four-cylinder engine with two valves per cylinder operated by a single chain-driven overhead camshaft. Fuelling was provided by four 20 mm Keihin carburettors. The CB400F is commonly known as the Honda 400 Four.

Matchless British motorcycle and automobile manufacturer

Matchless is one of the oldest marques of British motorcycles, manufactured in Plumstead, London, between 1899 and 1966. A wide range of models were produced under the Matchless name, ranging from small two-strokes to 750 cc four-stroke twins. Matchless had a long history of racing success; a Matchless ridden by Charlie Collier won the first single-cylinder race in the first Isle of Man TT in 1907.

Motorcycle engine Engine that powers a motorcycle

A motorcycle engine is an engine that powers a motorcycle. Motorcycle engines are typically two-stroke or four-stroke internal combustion engines, but other engine types, such as Wankels and electric motors, have been used.

Honda CB450

The Honda CB450 is a standard motorcycle made by Honda from 1965 to 1974 with a 444 cc (27.1 cu in) 180° DOHC straight-twin engine. Producing 45 bhp, it was Honda's first "big" motorcycle, though it did not succeed in its goal of competing directly against the larger Triumphs, Nortons, and Harley-Davidsons in the North American market at the time. As a result, Honda tried again, leading to the development of the four cylinder Honda CB750 that marked a turning point for Honda and beginning of the "superbike" era of motorcycles.

Phil Read British motorcycle racer

Phillip William Read, is an English former professional motorcycle racer. He competed in Grand Prix motorcycle racing from 1961 to 1976. Read is notable for being the first competitor to win world championships in the 125 cc, 250 cc and 500 cc classes. Although he was often overshadowed by his contemporary, Mike Hailwood, he won seven FIM Grand Prix road racing world championships. In 2013, Read was named an FIM Legend for his motorcycling achievements.

BSA Rocket 3/Triumph Trident 1960s/1970s British motorcycle made by Triumph Engineering, Meriden

The Triumph Trident and BSA Rocket 3 was a technically advanced, high-performance roadster motorcycle made by Triumph Engineering and BSA from 1968 to 1975, and sold under both the Triumph and BSA marques. Alongside the Honda CB750, and later the Kawasaki triples, it brought a new level of sophistication to street motorcycles, marking the beginning of the superbike era. The Honda CB750 overshadowed the Trident to be remembered as the 'first superbike', in spite of the Triumph Trident actually debuting before the Honda by a few weeks.

Yamaha FZR1000 Motorcycle model produced by Yamaha

The Yamaha FZR1000 is a motorcycle produced by Yamaha from 1987 to 1995. Classed as a sports motorcycle.

Rudge-Whitworth British bicycle, motorcycle and sports car manufacturer

Rudge Whitworth Cycles was a British bicycle, bicycle saddle, motorcycle and sports car wheel manufacturer that resulted from the merger of two bicycle manufacturers in 1894, Whitworth Cycle Co. of Birmingham, founded by Charles Henry Pugh and his two sons Charles Vernon and John, and Rudge Cycle Co. of Coventry.

Douglas (motorcycles) British motorcycle manufacturer

Douglas was a British motorcycle manufacturer from 1907–1957 based in Kingswood, Bristol, owned by the Douglas family, and especially known for its horizontally opposed twin cylinder engined bikes and as manufacturers of speedway machines. The company also built a range of cars between 1913 and 1922.

Honda CB550

The Honda CB550 is a 544 cc (33.2 cu in) standard motorcycle made by Honda from 1974 to 1978. It has a four-cylinder SOHC air-cooled wet sump engine. The first version, the CB550K, was a development of the earlier CB500, and like its predecessor, had four exhaust pipes, four silencers and wire-spoked wheels.

Peter Williams (motorcyclist) British motorcycle racer

Peter Williams was a British former professional motorcycle racer. He competed in Grand Prix motorcycle road racing from 1966 to 1973. He also competed at many levels on home short-circuit races. He raced many times on the Isle of Man TT course from 1966 to 1973. His father was Jack Williams who ran the Associated Motor Cycles (AMC) race department. Williams trained in mechanical engineering and introduced via racing alloy wheels, an innovation which is commonplace on today's road bikes, and was also an early pioneer of solo-motorcycle disc brakes.

Featherbed frame Motorcycle frame

The featherbed frame was a motorcycle frame invented by the McCandless brothers and offered to the British Norton motorcycle company to improve the performance of their racing motorcycles in 1950. It was considered revolutionary at the time, and the best handling frame that a racer could have. Later adopted for Norton production motorcycles, it was also widely used by builders of custom hybrids such as the Triton, becoming legendary and remaining influential to this day.

Honda CB650

The Honda CB650 is a 627 cc (38.3 cu in) standard motorcycle produced from 1979 to 1985. It featured a four-cylinder, SOHC, air-cooled, wet sump engine, with two valves per cylinder. The CB650 was a development of the CB550, itself derived from the even earlier CB500. The CB650 was the last of Honda's successful series of air-cooled SOHC fours that began in 1969 with the Honda CB750.

Colin Jordan Seeley was a British motorcycle retailer who later became a motorcycle sidecar racer, motorcycle designer, constructor and retailer of accessories. In 1992 he was involved in running the Norton Rotary race team.

BSA motorcycles Former British motorcycle marque

BSA motorcycles were made by the Birmingham Small Arms Company Limited (BSA), which was a major British industrial combine, a group of businesses manufacturing military and sporting firearms; bicycles; motorcycles; cars; buses and bodies; steel; iron castings; hand, power, and machine tools; coal cleaning and handling plants; sintered metals; and hard chrome process.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "The Honda CB500 Four". Motorcycle Classics. November–December 2008. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 Falloon, Ian (24 June 2005). The Honda Story: Road And Racing Motorcycles From 1948 To The Present Day. Haynes Publishing. p. 70. ISBN   978-1859609668.
  3. 1 2 3 Motorcycle Mechanics, March 1972, pp.28-29 Scene at the Show '72. Accessed 15 June 2015
  4. "Race Results - The official Isle of Man TT website". Iomtt.com. Retrieved 2011-12-30.