Hone Glendinning

Last updated
Hone Glendinning
Born16 August 1912
Died26 August 1997 (1997-08-27) (aged 85)
Other namesHone McMahon Glendining
OccupationCinematographer
Years active1934–1964 (film)

Hone Glendinning (16 August 1912 – 26 August 1997) was a British cinematographer. [1] He worked on over seventy films, including a number of documentaries.

Contents

Selected filmography

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References

  1. Keaney p.68

Bibliography