Honoratus of Amiens

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Saint Honoratus (Honorius) of Amiens
HonoratusAmiens.jpg
Bishop of Amiens
Diedc. 600 AD
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
Feast 16 May
Attributes baker's peel or shovel; bishop with a large Host; bishop with three Hosts on a baker's shovel; loaves; prelate with a hand reaching from heaven to give him bread for the Mass
Patronage bakers, confectioners, bakers of altar bread, candle-makers, florists, flour merchants, corn chandlers, oil refiners, and pastry chefs

Saint Honoratus of Amiens (Honoré, sometimes Honorius) (d. 16 January ca. 400 ) was the seventh bishop of Amiens. [1] His feast day is May 16 [2] .

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Contents

Hagiography

He was born in Port-le-Grand (Ponthieu) near Amiens to a noble family. He was said to be virtuous from birth. He was taught by his predecessor in the bishopric of Amiens, Saint Beatus (Beat). He resisted being elected bishop of Amiens, believing himself unworthy of this honor. According to hagiographic tradition, a ray of light of divine origin descended upon his head upon his election as bishop. There also appeared holy oil of unknown origin on his forehead.

Port-le-Grand Commune in Hauts-de-France, France

Port-le-Grand is a commune in the Somme department in Hauts-de-France in northern France.

Ponthieu was one of six feudal counties that eventually merged to become part of the Province of Picardy, in northern France. Its chief town is Abbeville.

Hagiography biography of a Christian saint

A hagiography is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions.

According to a legend, when it was known in his hometown that he had been proclaimed bishop, his nursemaid, who was baking bread for the family, refused to believe that Honoratus had been elevated to such a position. She remarked that she would believe the news only if the peel she had been using to bake bread put down roots and turned itself into a tree. When the peel was placed into the ground, it was transformed into a mulberry tree that gave flowers and fruit. This miraculous tree was still being shown in the sixteenth century.

Peel (tool) tool

A peel is a shovel-like tool used by bakers to slide loaves of bread, pizzas, pastries, and other baked goods into and out of an oven. It is usually made of wood, with a flat carrying surface for holding the baked good and a handle extending from one side of that surface. Alternatively, the carrying surface may be made of sheet metal, which is attached to a wooden handle. Wood has the advantage that it does not become hot enough to burn the user's hands the way metal can, even if it is frequently in the oven. The word presumably derives from the French pelle, which describes both a peel and a shovel.

<i>Morus nigra</i> species of plant

Morus nigra, called black mulberry or blackberry, is a species of flowering plant in the family Moraceae, native to southwestern Asia, where it has been cultivated for so long that its precise natural range is unknown. It is known for its large number of chromosomes, 308 . Other mulberry species are sometimes confused with black mulberry, particularly black-fruited individuals of the white mulberry, but black mulberry can be distinguished by the uniformly hairy lower leaf surface.

During his bishopric, he discovered the relics of Victoricus, Fuscian, and Gentian, which had remained hidden for 300 years.

Victoricus, Fuscian, and Gentian Gallo-Roman saints

Victoricus, Fuscian and Gentian were three Christian martyrs later venerated as Roman Catholic saints. Their feast day falls on December 11.

Veneration

A branch of Saint Honore Cake Shop, a Hong Kong chain bakery popular in Hong Kong and Macau HK Wan Chai Chun Yuan Jie Spring Garden Lane night Saint Honore Cake Shop.jpg
A branch of Saint Honore Cake Shop, a Hong Kong chain bakery popular in Hong Kong and Macau

His devotion was widespread in France following reports of numerous miracles when his body was exhumed in 1060.

France Republic with mainland in Europe and numerous oversea territories

France, officially the French Republic, is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany to the northeast, Switzerland and Italy to the east, and Andorra and Spain to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres (248,573 sq mi) and a total population of 67.3 million. France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre. Other major urban areas include Lyon, Marseille, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Lille and Nice.

Miracle highly unusual event believed to be of supernatural or divine origin

A miracle is an event not explicable by natural or scientific laws. Such an event may be attributed to a supernatural being, magic, a miracle worker, a saint, or a religious leader.

After his death, his relics were invoked against drought. Bishop Guy, son of the Count of Amiens, ordered that a procession be held, in which an urn holding Honoratus' relics were carried around the walls of the city. Rain is said to have fallen soon after.[ citation needed ] In 1240, during construction of the cathedral of Amiens, the relics of Honoratus were carried through the surrounding countryside in a quest for funds. [3]

Drought extended period when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply

A drought or drouth is a natural disaster of below-average precipitation in a given region, resulting in prolonged shortages in the water supply, whether atmospheric, surface water or ground water. A drought can last for months or years, or may be declared after as few as 15 days. It can have a substantial impact on the ecosystem and agriculture of the affected region and harm to the local economy. Annual dry seasons in the tropics significantly increase the chances of a drought developing and subsequent bush fires. Periods of heat can significantly worsen drought conditions by hastening evaporation of water vapour.

Urn container

An urn is a vase, often with a cover, that normally has a somewhat narrowed neck above a rounded body and a footed pedestal. Describing a vessel as an "urn", as opposed to a vase or other terms, generally reflects its use rather than any particular shape or origin. The term is especially often used for funerary urns, vessels used in burials, either to hold the cremated ashes or as grave goods, but is used in many other contexts; in catering large vessels for serving tea or coffee are often called "tea-urns", even when they are metal cylinders of purely functional design. Large sculpted vases are often called urns, whether placed outdoors, in gardens or as architectural ornaments on buildings, or kept inside.

In 1202, a baker named Renold Theriens (Renaud Cherins) donated to the city of Paris some land to build a chapel in honor of the saint. The chapel became one of the richest in Paris, and gave its name to Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré. In 1400, the bakers of Paris established their guild in the church of Saint Honoratus, celebrating his feast on 16 May and spreading his cult.

He is also the patron of a Carthusian establishment at Abbeville, which was founded in 1306.

In 1659, Louis XIV ordered that every baker observe the feast of Saint Honoratus, and give donations in honor of the saint and for the benefit of the community. [4]

He is the namesake of the St. Honoré Cake.

A statue of Honoratus stands in the portal of Amiens Cathedral.

Notes

  1. The oldest catalogue of Amiens's bishops exists in a late twelfth-century collection of the works of Robert of Torigny]] (J.S. Ott, "Urban space, memory, and episcopal authority: The bishops of Amiens in peace and conflict, 1073-1164", Viator31.3, 2000).[ page needed ]
  2. "CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Saint Honoratus". www.newadvent.org. Retrieved 2019-01-30.
  3. "Such a relic quest is depicted in the tympanum of the south transept" of Amiens, according to Stephen Murray, A Gothic Sermon: Making a Contract with the Mother of God, Saint Mary of Amiens.[ page needed ]
  4. Honorato de Amiens, Santo

^ Sometimes 653 is given as his date of death due to confusion with Saint Honorius, Archbishop of Canterbury.

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