Hook sword

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Hook swords, used (as is typical) as a pair. Hook Swords.jpg
Hook swords, used (as is typical) as a pair.

The hook sword, twin hooks, fu tao, hu tou gou (tiger head hook) or shuang gou (Chinese :鈎 or 鉤; pinyin :Gou) is a Chinese weapon traditionally associated with northern styles of Chinese martial arts and Wushu weapons routines, but now often practiced by southern styles as well.

Contents

Background

Reliable information on hook swords is difficult to come by.[ citation needed ] While sometimes called an ancient weapon and described as dating from the Song dynasty to Warring States or even earlier, most antique examples and artistic depictions are from the late Qing era or later, suggesting that they are actually a comparatively recent design. They were also an exclusively civilian weapon, appearing in none of the official listings of Chinese armaments. Surviving sharpened examples point to actual use as weapons, but their rarity, and the training necessary to use them, strongly suggest that they were only rarely used as such.

Characteristics

Also known as "tiger hook swords" or qian kun ri yue dao (literally "Heaven and Earth, Sun and Moon sword" [1] ), these weapons have a sharp blade similar to the jian, though possibly thicker or sometimes unsharpened, with a prong or hook (similar to a shepherd's crook) near the tip. Guards are substantial, in the style of butterfly swords. Often used in pairs, the hooks of the weapons may be used to trap or deflect other weapons.

There are five components to the hook sword:

Use

Routines for hook swords are taught in such northern schools as Northern Shaolin and Seven-Star Mantis, and in some schools of southern arts such as Choy Lay Fut. Modern routines for hook swords are often very flashy, and may involve techniques such as linking paired weapons and wielding them as a single long, flexible weapon. Most routines are single person. Some schools of Baguazhang also teach a similar weapon, often called "deer horn knives" or "Mandarin duck knives." These weapons typically feature a much shorter or entirely missing main hook, and instead focus on the various cutting and stabbing blades arranged around the guard. Because of the various protrusions and the high possibility for accidental hooking or stabbing, they are almost never used in sparring, and are used sparingly in two person routines

In the film One-Armed Swordsman , a modified version of the hook sword is used.

Kabal from the video game series Mortal Kombat wields a pair of hook swords. They were packaged with Liu Kang, Scorpion, Jade, and Shao Kahn 6-inch figures, as generic weapons in the toyline made by Toy Island.

In Avatar: The Last Airbender , Jet wields a pair of hook swords.

In The Legend of Korra: Turf Wars , The character Tokuga also wields a pair of hook swords.

In the 2001 film "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon", Michelle Yeoh's character wields a set of hook swords as one of the weapons she uses in her duel against Zi-Yi Zhang's character.

In the video game For Honor , Nuxia wields a pair of hook swords.

In the video game Path of Exile , the weapon can be wielded by the player and it exists under the name of "Tiger Hook".

The assassin The Kiss of Death uses a pair of hook swords in the 2019 Lois Lane comic book series.

In the video game Dynasty Warriors , the character Yue Jin uses a pair of hook swords in Dynasty Warriors 8, 8 Xtrem Legends, and Empires.

In the video game Piofiore: Fated Memories , the character Yang uses a pair of shuang gou when in combat.

In the shadow fight games, you can get shuang gou. (in sf3 you get it in the beginning of chapter 2, in sf2 you get in at LVL 11 with 52 gems, in sf1 it is nonexistant.)

In the manga Tekken Chinmi , the character Siba "The Bounty Hunter" use double sword hook.

In Deadliest Warrior, a Shaolin monk uses two hook swords to fight a Maori warrior.

See also

Related Research Articles

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<i>Jian</i> Chinese double-edged sword

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<i>Dao</i> (sword) Single-edged Chinese sword primarily used for slashing and chopping

Dao are single-edged Chinese swords, primarily used for slashing and chopping. The most common form is also known as the Chinese sabre, although those with wider blades are sometimes referred to as Chinese broadswords. In China, the dao is considered one of the four traditional weapons, along with the gun, qiang (spear), and the jian, called in this group “The General of Weapons".

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Zanbatō (斬馬刀) is an especially large, single-edged sword dating to the Heian period of historical Japan. The name zanbatō translates to "horse-slaying sword" or "horse-chopping saber". Original examples came from Song Dynasty China and were employed by anti-cavalry infantry in the same manner.

Hung Ga

Hung Ga (洪家), Hung Kuen (洪拳), or Hung Ga Kuen (洪家拳) is a southern Chinese martial art belonging to the southern shaolin styles. It is associated with the Cantonese folk hero Wong Fei Hung, a Hung Ga master.

Northern Praying Mantis

Northern Praying Mantis is a style of Chinese martial arts, sometimes called Shandong Praying Mantis after its province of origin. It was created by Wang Lang (王朗) and was named after the praying mantis, an insect, the aggressiveness of which inspired the style. One Mantis legend places the creation of the style in the Song Dynasty when Wang Lang was supposedly one of 18 masters gathered by the Abbot Fu Ju (福居), a legendary persona of the historical Abbot Fu Yu (福裕) (1203–1275), to improve Shaolin martial arts. However, most legends place Wang Lang in the late Ming Dynasty.

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Classification of swords

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Butterfly sword Single-edged blade

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Chinese swords

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Yu Chenghui, sometimes credited as Yue Sing-wai, was a Chinese actor, action director and martial artist.

Three-section staff

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References

  1. "Chinese Martial Art Weapons - Ken To Fude No Ryu Kenshu Kai Karate - Hanshi Solly Said". Kenfuderyu.co.za. Retrieved 2013-05-05.

Bibliography