Hoonah–Angoon Census Area, Alaska

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Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska
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Inland Passage to Dicks Arm, view from Cape Spencer Light
Map of Alaska highlighting Hoonah-Angoon Census Area.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Alaska
Map of USA AK full.png
Alaska's location within the U.S.
Established2007 [1]
Largest city Hoonah
Area
  Total10,914 sq mi (28,267 km2)
  Land7,525 sq mi (19,490 km2)
  Water3,389 sq mi (8,777 km2), 31.1%
Population (est.)
  (2018)2,151
  Density0.29/sq mi (0.11/km2)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Alaska: UTC−9/−8

Hoonah–Angoon Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,150. [2] It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest community is the city of Hoonah.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Alaska State of the United States of America

Alaska is a U.S. state in the northwest extremity of the United States West Coast, just across the Bering Strait from Asia. The Canadian province of British Columbia and territory of Yukon border the state to the east and southeast. Its most extreme western part is Attu Island, and it has a maritime border with Russia to the west across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas—southern parts of the Arctic Ocean. The Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest. It is the largest U.S. state by area and the seventh largest subnational division in the world. In addition, it is the 3rd least populous and the most sparsely populated of the 50 United States; nevertheless, it is by far the most populous territory located mostly north of the 60th parallel in North America: its population—estimated at 738,432 by the United States Census Bureau in 2015— is more than quadruple the combined populations of Northern Canada and Greenland. Approximately half of Alaska's residents live within the Anchorage metropolitan area. Alaska's economy is dominated by the fishing, natural gas, and oil industries, resources which it has in abundance. United States armed forces bases and tourism are also a significant part of the economy.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million, as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

History

Boundaries of the former Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area. Map of Alaska highlighting Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area.svg
Boundaries of the former Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area.

The census area was significantly larger in the 1990 census, at which time it was the Skagway–Yakutat–Angoon Census Area. After Yakutat was incorporated as a consolidated-city borough on September 22, 1992, it was renamed Skagway–Hoonah–Angoon Census Area; [3] When Skagway followed suit on June 20, 2007, [4] [5] the census area assumed its current name.

1990 United States Census determined the resident population of the United States on 1 April 1990

The Twenty-first United States Census, conducted by the Census Bureau, was the first census to be directed by a woman, Barbara Everitt Bryant. It determined the resident population of the United States to be 248,709,873, an increase of 9.8 percent over the 226,545,805 persons enumerated during the 1980 Census.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the census area has a total area of 10,914 square miles (28,270 km2), of which 7,525 square miles (19,490 km2) is land and 3,389 square miles (8,780 km2) (31.1%) is water. [6] A map showing its current boundaries is shown here: [7]

Adjacent boroughs and census areas

Haines Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

Haines Borough is a home-rule borough located in the state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,508.

Petersburg Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

Petersburg Borough is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska. According to Census Bureau estimates, the population was 3,221 in 2018. The borough seat is Petersburg. Petersburg is the most recently created county equivalent in the United States.

Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine

The Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine is a type of local government administration in northwestern British Columbia, Canada. As of the Canada 2001 Census it had a population of 40,876 living on a land area of 91,910.63 km². Its administrative offices are in the city of Terrace. The next-largest municipality in the regional district is the District Municipality of Kitimat. The other incorporated municipalities in the regional district are the Village of Hazelton, the District of New Hazelton and the District of Stewart. Unincorporated communities are many, most of them Indian Reserves which are not part of the governmental system of the regional district, which has limited powers relating mostly to municipal-type services. The remote settlement of Dease Lake, formerly in the Stikine Region, was added to the regional district on December 1, 2007.

National protected areas

Glacier Bay Wilderness

Glacier Bay Wilderness is a wilderness area in Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve in the U.S. state of Alaska. It consists of the park section of 3.28-million-acre (13,300 km2) Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Surrounded by a spectacular, glaciated horseshoe rim of mountains, the bay is sheltered by the Fairweather Range to the west and the Saint Elias Mountains on the north. The highest peaks, topped by Mount Fairweather at 15,300 feet (4,700 m), stand almost three miles (5 km) above the sea and attract intrepid mountaineers. No trails exist, but backpacking is growing increasingly popular, often along numerous icy streams sometimes welcoming and sometimes choked with brush. Brown and black bears are numerous on shore. Firearms are not permitted in the park section.

Tongass National Forest national forest in Alaska

The Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska is the largest national forest in the United States at 16.7 million acres (68,000 km2). Most of its area is part of the temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, itself part of the larger Pacific temperate rain forest WWF ecoregion, and is remote enough to be home to many species of endangered and rare flora and fauna. The Tongass, which is managed by the United States Forest Service, encompasses islands of the Alexander Archipelago, fjords and glaciers, and peaks of the Coast Mountains. An international border with Canada runs along the crest of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains. The forest is administered from Forest Service offices in Ketchikan. There are local ranger district offices located in Craig, Hoonah, Juneau, Ketchikan, Petersburg, Sitka, Thorne Bay, Wrangell, and Yakutat.

Admiralty Island National Monument

Admiralty Island National Monument is a United States National Monument located on Admiralty Island in Southeast Alaska, and is managed as part of the Tongass National Forest. It was created December 1, 1978, and covers 955,747 acres (3,868 km2) in Southeast Alaska. The remoteness of the monument led Congress to pass legislation designating all but 18,351 acres (74 km2) of the monument as the Kootznoowoo Wilderness, ensuring that the vast bulk of this monument is permanently protected from development. The monument is administered by the U.S. Forest Service from offices in Juneau.

Demographics

Map of the former Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area Map of Alaska highlighting Skagway-Hoonah-Angoon Census Area.svg
Map of the former Skagway–Hoonah–Angoon Census Area
Note: Demographic data below is for the former "Skagway–Hoonah–Angoon" Census Area, which still includes Skagway Borough.
Historical population
CensusPop.
2010 2,150
Est. 20182,151 [8] 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [9]
2010–2018 [2]

As of the census [10] of 2000, there were 3,436 people, 1,369 households, and 866 families residing in the census area. The population density was 0.30 people per square mile (0.12/km²). There are 2,108 housing units. The racial makeup of the census area was 58.15% White, 0.15% Black or African American, 35.01% Native American, 0.38% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 0.96% from other races, and 5.21% from two or more races. 2.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 3.95% reported speaking Tlingit at home, while 1.83% speak Spanish .

There were 1,369 households out of which 30.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.30% were married couples living together, 8.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.70% were non-families. 30.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the census area, the population was spread out with 26.80% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 29.50% from 25 to 44, 29.30% from 45 to 64, and 7.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 116.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 120.70 males.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated places

See also

Related Research Articles

Southeast Alaska

Southeast Alaska, sometimes referred to as the Alaska Panhandle, is the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of Alaska, bordered to the east by the northern half of the Canadian province of British Columbia. The majority of Southeast Alaska's area is part of the Tongass National Forest, the United States' largest national forest. In many places, the international border runs along the crest of the Boundary Ranges of the Coast Mountains. The region is noted for its scenery and mild rainy climate.

Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska Borough in the U.S. of Alaska

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Kodiak Island Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

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Lake and Peninsula Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

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Matanuska-Susitna Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

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Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

Northwest Arctic Borough is a borough located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,523. The borough seat is Kotzebue. The borough was formed on June 2, 1986.

Prince of Wales–Hyder Census Area, Alaska Census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska

Prince of Wales–Hyder Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,559. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Craig and Metlakatla. It was formerly part of the Census Bureau's Prince of Wales–Outer Ketchikan Census Area, but the name was changed in 2008 after most of the Outer Ketchikan was lost to annexation by the Ketchikan Gateway Borough.

Valdez–Cordova Census Area, Alaska Census area in the state of Alaska, United States

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Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska Census area in the United States

Southeast Fairbanks Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,029. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Deltana and Tok, both unincorporated CDPs.

Yakutat, Alaska Home Rule Borough in Alaska, United States

The City and Borough of Yakutat is a borough in the U.S. state of Alaska and was the name of a former city within it. The name is Tlingit, Yaakwdáat but it originally derives from an Eyak name diyaʼqudaʼt and was influenced by the Tlingit word yaakw. The borough covers an area about six times the size of the U.S. state of Rhode Island, making it one of the largest counties in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 662, down from 680 in 2000.

Game Creek, Alaska Census-designated place in Alaska, United States

Game Creek is a census-designated place (CDP) on Chichagof Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, United States. The population was 18 at the 2010 census, down from 35 at the 2000 census.

Hobart Bay, Alaska CDP in Alaska, United States

Hobart Bay is a census-designated place that was located in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska during the 2010 United States Census, but is now part of Petersburg Borough. As of the 2010 Census, the population of the CDP was one, down from 3 in 2000.

Klukwan, Alaska Census-designated place in Alaska, United States

Klukwan is a census-designated place (CDP) in Alaska, United States. It is technically in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, though it is an enclave of Haines Borough. At the 2010 census the population was 95, down from 139 at the 2000 census.

Skagway, Alaska Borough in Alaska, United States

The Municipality and Borough of Skagway is a first-class borough in Alaska on the Alaska Panhandle. As of the 2010 census, the population was 968. Estimates put the 2018 population at 1,148 people. The population doubles in the summer tourist season in order to deal with more than 1,000,000 visitors each year. Incorporated as a borough on June 25, 2007, it was previously a city in the Skagway-Yakutat-Angoon Census Area.

Tenakee Springs, Alaska City in Alaska, United States

Tenakee Springs is a city on Chichagof Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 131, up from 104 at the 2000 census.

Whitestone Logging Camp, Alaska Census-designated place in Alaska, United States

Whitestone Logging Camp is a census-designated place (CDP) on Chichagof Island in Hoonah-Angoon Census Area, Alaska, United States. At the 2010 census the population was 17, down from 116 at the 2000 census. It is not to be confused with Whitestone, another CDP in Southeast Fairbanks Census Area.

Chichagof Island island in the United States of America

Chichagof Island, or Shee Kaax, is an island in the Alexander Archipelago of the Alaska Panhandle. At 75 miles (121 km) long and 50 miles (80 km) wide, it has a land area of 2,048.61 square miles (5,305.9 km2), making it the fifth largest island in the United States and the 109th largest island in the world. Its coastline measures 742 miles. There was a 2000 census population of 1,342 persons. It is one of the ABC islands of Alaska. Chichagof Island has the highest population of bears per square mile of any place on Earth.

Stikine Region regional district of British Columbia

The Stikine Region is an unincorporated area in northwesternmost British Columbia, Canada and is the only area in B.C. not in a regional district. The Stikine Region was left unincorporated following legislation that established the province's regional districts in 1968 and is not classified as a regional district. It contains no municipal governments which normally constitute the majority of seats on the boards of regional districts. There is only one local planning area, the Atlin Community Planning Area, which was combined in 2009 with the Atlin Community Improvement District to provide fire, landfill, water, streetlighting, sidewalks and advisory land use services. All other services not provided privately are administered directly by various provincial government ministries. The area around Dease Lake, formerly in the Stikine Region, is now within the boundaries of the Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine following a boundary amendment in 2008.

References

  1. The census area acquired its current name in 2007, after Skagway Borough was created.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 31, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  3. Population of Alaska by Labor Market Region, Borough and Census Area, 1990–1999, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 20, 2009.
  4. https://www.census.gov/geo/www/ansi/changenotes.html%5B%5D
  5. June 5, 2008 election, Skaguay News, summer edition, 2008. Page 17.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. Map: Hoonah-Angoon Census Area Archived August 11, 2009, at the Wayback Machine Alaska Department of Labor
  8. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  9. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  10. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved May 14, 2011.

Coordinates: 58°08′N135°09′W / 58.133°N 135.150°W / 58.133; -135.150