House of Bogdan-Mușat

Last updated
House of Bogdan (Mușat)
MoldavianOldCoatWijsbergen.jpg
Country Moldavia
Founded1363
Founder Bogdan I of Moldavia
Current headextinct
Final ruler Iliaș Alexandru
Titles Prince/Voivode (Voievod)
Hospodar/Dux (Domn)
Estate(s)of Moldavia
Manuscript folio with the coat of arms of the House of Bogdan (lower-left corner) and the aurochs from Moldavia's coat of arms Stefan-1502-Cod.-slaw.-fol.-245r.jpg
Manuscript folio with the coat of arms of the House of Bogdan (lower-left corner) and the aurochs from Moldavia's coat of arms

The House of Bogdan, commonly referred to as the House of Mușat, was the ruling family which established the Principality of Moldova with Bogdan I (c. 1363 - 1367), giving the country its first line of Princes, one closely related with the Basarab rulers of Wallachia by several marriages through time. The Mușatins are named after Margareta Mușata who married Costea, a son of Bogdan I. For a long time it has been thought that Mușata was a daughter of Bogdan I and Costea was a member of House of Basarab who bore the name Muşat, all speculations unsupported by any documents.

Contents

The word mușat, which gives the dynasty its name, means handsome in old Romanian.

Genealogy

Recent studies, [1] [2] based on the careful consideration of existing documents and a recently discovered chronicle of Moldavia in Poland, managed to establish the most likely link between Bogdan I and his successors from the so-called house of Mușat, as well as the succession line and ruling periods of each prince from the 14th century.

The following genealogical tree is an oversimplified version, meant to show only the ruling princes, their documented brothers and sisters, and the spouses/extramarital liaisons of those who had ruling heirs, following the conventions:

Bogdan I
1363-†1367
Maria
Ștefan? Costea Margareta
(Mușata)
Lațcu
1368-†1375
Ana
Ștefan
1368
Petru (I)
1367-1368
Petru I
1375-†1391
Roman I
1392-†1394
Anastasia
Ștefan I 1
1394-1399
Mihail1 Iuga 1
1399-1400
Alexandru
cel Bun
2
1400-†1432
Margareta1
Ana (Neacșa)2
Ringala3
Marina4
Stanca5
?6
Bogdan2?
Roman1
Vasilisa1
Anastasia1/2
Maria1/2
Alexandru4
Bogdan4
Iliaș I 2
1432-1442
Maria
Holszański
Ștefan II 5
1433-†1447
Petru II 4
1443-1445
1447, 1448
Petru Aron
1451-1452
1454-1455
1455-1457
Bogdan II 6
1449-†1451
Oltea
Roman II
1438-1442
1447-1448
Alexăndrel
1448-1449
1452-1454
†1455
Anastasia Ștefan cel Mare
1457-†1504
Evdokia de Kiev1
Maria de Mangop2
Maria Voichița3
Marușca4
Maria5
Maria
Sora
Ioachim
Ioan
Cârstea
Alexandru4? Bogdan III 3
1504-†1517
Nastasia1
Ruxandra2
Stana3
Nastasia4
Alexandru1
Elena1
Petru1
Ilie2
Bogdan2
Ana3
Maria3
Petru Rareș 5
1527-1538
1541-†1546
Maria1
Elena Ecaterina Brancovici2
Caterina3
?4
Ștefan Lăcustă
1538-†1540
Iliaș Rareș 1
1546-1551
Ștefan Rareș 2
1551-†1552
Iancu Sasul 3
1579-1582
Alexandru1
Bogdan1
Constantin
Bogdan-Constantin4
daughter
Maria1
Ana1
Stana1
Maria1
Ana1
Ion1
son1
Ștefăniță 3
1517-†1527
Stana1
Serpega2
Pacoray3
Petru3
Ilie3
Pătrașcu3
Marica3
Ana3
Ana3
Aron
Ioan Iancu
Alexandru Cornea 3
1540-†1541
Alexandru Lăpușneanu 4
1552-1561
1564-1568
Ruxandra4
Ștefan
Ionașcu
Mihail Petru
Constantin
Cneajna
Marica
Trofana
Teodora
Anghelina
Anastasia
Bogdan Lăpușneanu
1568-1572
? Petru Cazacul
†1592
Aron Tiranul
1591-1592
1592-1595
Ilie "Blănarul"?
Ioan Vodă cel Cumplit 2
1572-†1574
Maria1
Maria Huru2
?3
Ioan Bogdan3 Alexandru cel Rău
1592
W: 1592-1593
Alexandru Iliaș
1620-1621
1631-1633
W: 1616-1618
W: 1627-1629
Elena1
Zamfira Duca2
Ștefan Surdul 2/3
W: 1591-1592
Petru1
Lazăr3
Radu1
W: 1632
Iliaș Alexandru 2
1666-1668
Domna (Domnica) CantacuzinoCasandra1
Ruxandra1
Bălașa1
Suzana1
Radu Iliaș
The last documented heir of House of Musat
d. 1704

One child - unknown.
1 son
1 daughter

See also

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Muşat may refer to:

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References

  1. Gorovei, Ştefan S., Întemeierea Moldovei. Probleme controversate, Editura Universităţii „Alexandru Ioan Cuza”, Iaşi, 1997, ISBN   973-9149-74-X
  2. Rezachevici, Constantin, Cronologia critică a domnilor din Ţara Românească şi Moldova, a. 1324 - 1881, vol. I, Editura Enciclopedică, Bucureşti, 2001, ISBN   973-45-0387-1