Howard Lindsay

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Howard Lindsay
BornHerman Nelke
(1889-03-29)March 29, 1889
Waterford, New York
DiedFebruary 11, 1968(1968-02-11) (aged 78)
New York City, New York
Notable awards Pulitzer Prize for Drama (1946)
Special Tony Award (1959)
Tony Award for Best Musical (1960)
Spouse Dorothy Stickney
(m.1927-1968; his death)

Howard Lindsay, born Herman Nelke, (March 29, 1889 – February 11, 1968) was an American theatrical producer, playwright, librettist, director and actor. He is best known for his writing work as part of the collaboration of Lindsay and Crouse, and for his performance, with his wife Dorothy Stickney, in the long-running play Life With Father .

A theatrical producer is a person who oversees all aspects of mounting a theatre production. The producer is responsible for the overall financial and managerial functions of a production or venue, raises or provides financial backing, and hires personnel for creative positions

A playwright or dramatist is a person who writes plays.

Theatre director person overseeing the mounting of a theatre production

A theatre director or stage director is an instructor in the theatre field who oversees and orchestrates the mounting of a theatre production by unifying various endeavours and aspects of production. The director's function is to ensure the quality and completeness of theatre production and to lead the members of the creative team into realizing their artistic vision for it. The director therefore collaborates with a team of creative individuals and other staff, coordinating research, stagecraft, costume design, props, lighting design, acting, set design, stage combat, and sound design for the production. If the production he or she is mounting is a new piece of writing or a (new) translation of a play, the director may also work with the playwright or translator. In contemporary theatre, after the playwright, the director is generally the primary visionary, making decisions on the artistic concept and interpretation of the play and its staging. Different directors occupy different places of authority and responsibility, depending on the structure and philosophy of individual theatre companies. Directors use a wide variety of techniques, philosophies, and levels of collaboration.

Contents

Biography

Lindsay graduated from Boston Latin School in 1907. He was an actor and director before turning to writing plays. He played the role of "Father" in Life With Father on Broadway in 1939. [1]

Boston Latin School first public school in the United States

The Boston Latin School is a first build public exam school in Boston, Massachusetts. It was established on April 23, 1635, making it both the oldest school in America and the first public school in the United States. The Public Latin School was a bastion for educating the sons of the Boston "Brahmin" elite, resulting in the school claiming many prominent New Englanders as alumni. Its curriculum follows that of the 18th century Latin school movement, which holds the classics to be the basis of an educated mind. Four years of Latin are mandatory for all pupils who enter the school in the 7th grade, three years for those who enter in the 9th. In 2007, the school was named one of the top 20 high schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report magazine. It was named a 2011 "Blue Ribbon School of Excellence", the Department of Education's highest award. As of 2018, it is listed under the "gold medal" list, ranking 48 out of the top 100 high schools in the United States by U.S. News & World Report.

Life With Father is a 1939 play by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, adapted from a humorous autobiographical book of stories compiled in 1935 by Clarence Day. The Broadway production ran for more than seven years to become the longest-running non-musical play on Broadway, a record that it still holds. The play was adapted into a 1947 feature film and a television series.

Together with Russel Crouse, Lindsay won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the 1946 play State of the Union , [2] which was adapted into a film directed by Frank Capra two years later.

Russel Crouse was an American playwright and librettist, best known for his work in the Broadway writing partnership of Lindsay and Crouse.

Pulitzer Prize for Drama award

The Pulitzer Prize for Drama is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It is one of the original Pulitzers, for the program was inaugurated in 1917 with seven prizes, four of which were awarded that year. It recognizes a theatrical work staged in the U.S. during the preceding calendar year.

State of the Union is a play by American playwrights Russel Crouse and Howard Lindsay about a fictional Republican presidential candidate.

The 1957 Rodgers and Hammerstein television musical Cinderella , recently revived by PBS, featured Lindsay and Stickney playing the roles of the King and Queen, [3] one of the few times a Lindsay performance has been captured on film.

Rodgers and Hammerstein 20th-century American songwriting team

Rodgers and Hammerstein refers to the duo of composer Richard Rodgers (1902–1979) and lyricist-dramatist Oscar Hammerstein II (1895–1960), who together were an influential, innovative and successful American musical theatre writing team. They created a string of popular Broadway musicals in the 1940s and 1950s, initiating what is considered the "golden age" of musical theatre. Five of their Broadway shows, Oklahoma!, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I and The Sound of Music, were outstanding successes, as was the television broadcast of Cinderella (1957). Of the other four that the team produced on Broadway during their lifetimes, Flower Drum Song was well-received, and none was an outright flop. Most of their shows have received frequent revivals around the world, both professional and amateur. Among the many accolades their shows garnered were thirty-four Tony Awards, fifteen Academy Awards, the Pulitzer Prize, and two Grammy Awards.

<i>Cinderella</i> (musical) musical written for television, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II in 1957

Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical written for television, but later played on stage, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Verre, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother and self-centered stepsisters, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into a Princess and finds her Prince.

PBS Public television network in the United States

The Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) is an American public broadcaster and television program distributor. It is a nonprofit organization and the most prominent provider of educational television programming to public television stations in the United States, distributing series such as American Experience, America's Test Kitchen, Antiques Roadshow, Arthur, Downton Abbey, Finding Your Roots, Frontline, The Magic School Bus, Masterpiece, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, Nature, Nova, the PBS NewsHour, Sesame Street, and This Old House.

In 1960, the team won the Tony Award for Best Musical for The Sound of Music , for which they wrote the book. [4] They also collaborated on Call Me Madam , Happy Hunting and Mr. President . [5]

The Tony Awards are yearly awards that recognize achievement in live Broadway theatre. The award for Best Musical is one of the ceremony's longest-standing awards, having been presented each year since 1949. The award goes to the producers of the winning musical. A musical is eligible for consideration in a given year if it has not previously been produced on Broadway and is not "determined... to be a 'classic' or in the historical or popular repertoire."

<i>The Sound of Music</i> musical

The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. It is based on the memoir of Maria von Trapp, The Story of the Trapp Family Singers. Set in Austria on the eve of the Anschluss in 1938, the musical tells the story of Maria, who takes a job as governess to a large family while she decides whether to become a nun. She falls in love with the children, and eventually their widowed father, Captain von Trapp. He is ordered to accept a commission in the German navy, but he opposes the Nazis. He and Maria decide on a plan to flee Austria with the children. Many songs from the musical have become standards, such as "Edelweiss", "My Favorite Things", "Climb Ev'ry Mountain", "Do-Re-Mi", and the title song "The Sound of Music".

Book medium for a collection of words and/or pictures to represent knowledge or a fictional story, often manifested in bound paper and ink, or in e-books

As a physical object, a book is a stack of usually rectangular pages oriented with one edge tied, sewn, or otherwise fixed together and then bound to the flexible spine of a protective cover of heavier, relatively inflexible material. The technical term for this physical arrangement is codex. In the history of hand-held physical supports for extended written compositions or records, the codex replaces its immediate predecessor, the scroll. A single sheet in a codex is a leaf, and each side of a leaf is a page.

Lindsay was a member of The Players Club, the theatrical club founded by Edwin Booth, and served as its president from 1955 to 1965. [6] Lindsay joined The Lambs in 1925 and remained a member until he died.His writing partner, Russel Crouse, was also a member of The Lambs. [7]

The Players (New York City) building

The Players, or the Players Club, is a private social club founded in New York City by the noted 19th-century Shakespearean actor Edwin Booth.

Edwin Booth 19th-century American actor

Edwin Thomas Booth was an American actor who toured throughout the United States and the major capitals of Europe, performing Shakespearean plays. In 1869, he founded Booth's Theatre in New York. Some theatrical historians consider him the greatest American actor, and the greatest Prince Hamlet, of the 19th century. His achievements are often overshadowed by his relationship with his brother, actor John Wilkes Booth, who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln.

Stickney and Howard maintained a longtime home in the Stanton section of Readington Township, New Jersey. [8]

Related Research Articles

<i>Call Me Madam</i> musical

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Lindsay Ann Crouse is an American actress. She made her Broadway debut in the 1972 revival of Much Ado About Nothing and appeared in her first film in 1976 in All the President's Men. For her role in the 1984 film Places in the Heart, she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Her other films include Slap Shot (1977), Between the Lines (1977), The Verdict (1982), Prefontaine (1997), and The Insider (1999). She also had a leading role in the 1987 film House of Games, which was directed by her then-husband David Mamet. In 1996, she received a Daytime Emmy Award nomination for "Between Mother and Daughter", an episode of CBS Schoolbreak Special. She is also a Grammy Award nominee.

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<i>Life with Father</i> (film) 1947 film by Michael Curtiz

Life with Father is a 1947 Technicolor American comedy film. It tells the true story of Clarence Day, a stockbroker who wants to be master of his house, but finds his wife and his children ignoring him, until they start making demands for him to change his own life. The story draws largely on the insistence by his wife that Clarence be baptized and Clarence's stubborn, sometimes ill-tempered nature. In keeping with the autobiography, all the children in the family are redheads. It stars William Powell and Irene Dunne as Clarence and his wife, supported by Elizabeth Taylor as a beautiful teenage girl with whom Clarence's oldest son becomes infatuated, along with Edmund Gwenn, ZaSu Pitts, Jimmy Lydon and Martin Milner. The film and its audio entered the public domain in 1975.

Stanton, New Jersey Unincorporated community in New Jersey, United States

Stanton is an unincorporated community located within Readington Township in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. The community dates back to the 17th century and was settled by the Dutch. It was originally called Housel's after Johannes Housel, who had a farmstead along Dreahook Road in the mid-18th century. After the death of William Housel, the last owner of the Housel farmstead, it then carried the name of Waggoner's Hill after landowner William Waggoner. The community took the descriptive name of Mount Pleasant during the beginning of the 20th century and would finally become known as Stanton to distinguish it from another Mount Pleasant. The name "Stanton" was taken from James Logan's Pennsylvania estate: Stenton, which in turn is named for the Scottish village where his father was born. Logan was a proprietor of West Jersey, a mayor of Philadelphia, and a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Logan Way in Readington is named after him, as well as Logan Circle and the Logan neighborhood in Philadelphia and Logan Township in Clinton County, Pennsylvania. In the 1830s, a Reformed Church and a general store were built, both of which are present today.

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References

  1. " 'Life With Father' Broadway" Playbill, accessed June 21, 2016
  2. "Pulitzer Prizes Awarded; 'State of Union' the Play" The New York Times, May 7, 1946
  3. " 'Cinderella' – 1957 Television Cast" masterworksbroadway.com, accessed June 21, 2016
  4. " 'The Sound of Music' Broadway" Playbill, accessed June 21, 2016
  5. "Howard Lindsay Credits" Playbill, accessed June 21, 2016
  6. "Howard Lindsay, Playwright, Star of 'Life With Father,' Dies" (PDF). The New York Times . February 12, 1968. p. 1. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  7. Bouman-Stickney House, Readington Township. Accessed June 9, 2016. "In 1935, Broadway playwright and producer Howard Lindsay purchased the house and surrounding property as a gift for his wife, Broadway and movie actress Dorothy Stickney. They used the house as a weekend and vacation retreat until Lindsay's death, in 1968."