Huerta

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A huerta (Spanish:  [ˈweɾta] ) or horta (Valencian:  [ˈɔɾta] , Portuguese:  [ˈɔɾtɐ] ), from Latin hortus, "garden", is a fertile area, or a field within a fertile area, common in Spain and Portugal, where a variety of common vegetables and fruit trees are cultivated for family consumption and sale. Typically, huertas belong to different people, huertas are also located in groups, or around rivers or other water sources because of the amount of irrigation required. It is a kind of market garden.

Contents

Huerta in Valencia, Spain Valencia Capital (huerta).jpg
Huerta in Valencia, Spain

Alternate definitions

Elinor Ostrom has defined huertas as "well-demarked irrigation areas surrounding or near towns" (emphasis added). [1]

See also

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References

  1. Ostrom, Elinor (2015). Governing the Commons, p.71.

Bibliography