Hugh Beaumont

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Hugh Beaumont
Hugh Beaumont 1956.JPG
Beaumont in 1956
Born
Eugene Hugh Beaumont

(1909-02-16)February 16, 1909
DiedMay 14, 1982(1982-05-14) (aged 73)
OccupationActor
Years active1940–1972
Spouse(s)
Kathryn Adams Doty
(m. 1941;div. 1974)
Children3

Eugene Hugh Beaumont (February 16, 1909 – May 14, 1982) was an American actor, television director, and writer. He was also licensed to preach by the Methodist church. [1] Beaumont is best known for his portrayal of Ward Cleaver on the television series Leave It to Beaver , originally broadcast from 1957 to 1963. Earlier, in 1946, he had starred in a series of low-budget crime films distributed by the Producers Releasing Corporation, performing in the role of private detective Michael Shayne. [2]

A television director is in charge of the activities involved in making a television program or section of a program. They are generally responsible for decisions about the editorial content and creative style of a program, and ensuring the producer's vision is delivered. Their duties may include originating program ideas, finding contributors, writing scripts, planning 'shoots', ensuring safety, leading the crew on location, directing contributors and presenters, and working with an editor to assemble the final product. The work of a television director can vary widely depending on the nature of the program, the practices of the production company, whether the program content is factual or drama, and whether it is live or recorded.

Ward Cleaver

Ward Cleaver, Jr. is a fictional character in the American television sitcom Leave It to Beaver. Ward and his wife, June, are often invoked as archetypal suburban parents of the 1950s babyboomers. At the start of the show, the couple are the parents of Wally, a twelve-year-old in the seventh grade, and seven-year-old third-grader Theodore, nicknamed "The Beaver". A typical episode from Leave It to Beaver follows a misadventure committed by one or both of the boys, and ends with the culprits receiving a moral lecture from their father and a hot meal from their mother.

<i>Leave It to Beaver</i> American sitcom from the 1950s and 60s

Leave It to Beaver is a late 1950s black-and-white American television sitcom about an inquisitive and often naïve boy, Theodore "The Beaver" Cleaver, and his adventures at home, in school, and around his suburban neighborhood. The show also starred Barbara Billingsley and Hugh Beaumont as Beaver's parents, June and Ward Cleaver, and Tony Dow as Beaver's brother Wally. The show has attained an iconic status in the United States, with the Cleavers exemplifying the idealized suburban family of the mid-20th century.

Contents

Early life

Beaumont was born in Eudora, Kansas. [3] His parents were Ethel Adaline Whitney and Edward H. Beaumont, a traveling salesman whose profession kept the family on the move. After graduating from the Baylor School, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, he attended the University of Chattanooga, where he played football. [4] He later studied at the University of Southern California and graduated with a Master of Theology degree in 1946.

Lawrence, Kansas City and County seat in Kansas, United States

Lawrence is the county seat of Douglas County and sixth-largest city in Kansas. It is located in the northeastern sector of the state, astride Interstate 70, between the Kansas and Wakarusa Rivers. As of the 2010 census, the city's population was 87,643. Lawrence is a college town and the home to both the University of Kansas and Haskell Indian Nations University.

Baylor School

Baylor School, commonly called Baylor, is a private, coeducational prep school in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Founded in 1893, the school currently sits atop a 690 acres (2.8 km2) campus and enrolls students in grades 6-12, including boarding students in grades 9-12. These students are served by Baylor's 148 members of faculty, over two-thirds of whom hold advanced degrees, including nearly 40 adults who live on campus and serve as dorm parents. Baylor has had a student win the Siemens Award for Advanced Placement in math and science and a teacher receive the National Siemens Award for Exemplary Teaching. The school is also an athletic powerhouse, having the best high school sports program in Tennessee and in the top 25 nationwide according to Sports Illustrated. In the past 21 years, Baylor has won a remarkable 157 state championships, including a national record of 16 consecutive victories in women's golf from 1995-2012. They have also repeatedly been named national champions in both men's and women's swimming by Swimming World Magazine. For the 2011-12 school year, Baylor enrolled 1070 young men and women, 20% of whom lived on campus as representatives of 25 states and 30 countries.

Chattanooga, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Chattanooga is a city located in Hamilton County, southeastern Tennessee, along the Tennessee River bordering Georgia. With an estimated population of 179,139 in 2017, it is the fourth-largest city in Tennessee and one of the two principal cities of East Tennessee, along with Knoxville. Served by multiple railroads and Interstate highways, Chattanooga is a transit hub. Chattanooga lies 118 miles (190 km) northwest of Atlanta, Georgia, 112 miles (180 km) southwest of Knoxville, Tennessee, 134 miles (216 km) southeast of Nashville, Tennessee, 102 miles (164 km) east-northeast of Huntsville, Alabama, and 147 miles (237 km) northeast of Birmingham, Alabama.

Career

Beaumont began his career in show business in 1931 by performing in theaters, nightclubs, and radio. He began acting in motion pictures in 1940, appearing in over three dozen films. Many of those roles were bit parts and minor roles and were not credited. He often worked with the actor William Bendix. In 1946–47, Beaumont starred in five films as the private detective Michael Shayne, taking over the role from Lloyd Nolan. In 1950 he also narrated the short film A Date with Your Family. [5]

William Bendix American actor (1906-1964)

William Bendix was an American film, radio, and television actor, who typically played rough, blue-collar characters. He is best remembered in films for the title role in The Babe Ruth Story. He also portrayed the clumsily earnest aircraft plant worker Chester A. Riley in both the radio and television versions of The Life of Riley. He received an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actor for Wake Island (1942).

Michael "Mike" Shayne is a fictional private detective character created during the late 1930s by writer Brett Halliday, a pseudonym of Davis Dresser. The character appeared in a series of seven films starring Lloyd Nolan for Twentieth Century Fox, five films from the low-budget Producers Releasing Corporation with Hugh Beaumont, a radio series under a variety of titles between 1944 and 1953, and later in 1960–1961 in a 32-episode NBC television series starring Richard Denning in the title role.

Lloyd Nolan American actor

Lloyd Benedict Nolan was an American film and television actor. Among his many roles, Nolan is remembered for originating the role of private investigator Michael Shayne in a series of 1940s B movies.

From 1950 to 1953, Beaumont was the narrator of the Reed Hadley series Racket Squad , based on the cases of a fictional detective, Captain John Braddock, in San Francisco. In a 1953 episode of Adventures of Superman titled "The Big Squeeze", Beaumont played an ex-convict with a wife and son whose trust he must win back after an apparent return to his criminal past. In 1952, he played the role of Reverend Randy Roberts in an episode of The Lone Ranger . In Hadley's second series, The Public Defender , which aired on CBS in 1954 and 1955, Beaumont appeared three times in the role of Ed McGrath. [1]

Reed Hadley actor

Reed Hadley was an American film, television and radio actor.

Racket Squad is an American TV crime drama series that aired from 1951 to 1953.

<i>Adventures of Superman</i> (TV series) US 1950s television series

Adventures of Superman is an American television series based on comic book characters and concepts that Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster created in 1938. The show was the first television series to feature Superman and began filming in 1951 in California on RKO-Pathé stages and the RKO Forty Acres back lot. Cereal manufacturer Kellogg's sponsored the show. The show, which was produced for first-run television syndication rather than a network, has disputed first and last air dates, but they are generally accepted as September 19, 1952, and April 28, 1958. The show's first two seasons were filmed in black and white; seasons three through six were filmed in color but originally telecast in black and white. Adventures of Superman was not shown in color until 1965, when the series was syndicated to local stations.

Before Beaumont and Barbara Billingsley were cast as the parents on Leave It to Beaver, each had appeared separately in the early 1950s on Rod Cameron's syndicated detective series City Detective . Consistent with his interest in the clergy, Beaumont played the Reverend Clifton R. Pond in an episode of the religious anthology series Crossroads . [1]

Barbara Billingsley Actress, model

Barbara Billingsley was an American film, television, voice, and stage actress. She began her career with uncredited roles in Three Guys Named Mike (1951), The Bad and the Beautiful (1952), Invaders from Mars (1953) and was featured in the 1950s movie The Careless Years, opposite Natalie Trundy before appearing in recurring TV roles such as The Brothers.

Rod Cameron (actor) Canadian-born film and television actor

Rod Cameron was a Canadian-born film and television actor whose career extended from the 1930s to the 1970s. He appeared in horror, war, action and science fiction movies, but is best remembered for his many westerns.

Detective investigator, either a member of a police agency or a private person

A detective is an investigator, usually a member of a law enforcement agency. They often collect information to solve crime by talking to witnesses and informants, collecting physical evidence, or searching records in databases. This leads them to arrest criminals and enable them to be convicted in court. A detective may work for the police or privately.

He appeared in one of the early episodes of the CBS Western series My Friend Flicka and guest-starred in an episode of Frank Lovejoy's detective series Meet McGraw . [6] In 1955, he also guest-starred in the Lassie episode "The Well", one of the first two episodes filmed as pilots for the new series. In those initial installments he portrays Mr. Saunders, a water company executive interested in purchasing the Miller family's well. [1]

Western (genre) multimedia genre of stories set primarily in the American Old West

Western is a genre of various arts which tell stories set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, neckerchief bandannas, vests, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Recurring characters include the aforementioned cowboys, Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, gamblers, soldiers, and settlers. The ambience is usually punctuated with a Western music score, including American and Mexican folk music such as country, Native American music, New Mexico music, and rancheras.

<i>My Friend Flicka</i> (TV series) television program

My Friend Flicka is a 39-episode western television series set at the fictitious Goose Bar Ranch in Wyoming at the turn of the 20th century. The program was filmed in color but initially aired in black and white on CBS at 7:30 p.m. Fridays from February 10, 1956, to February 1, 1957. It was a mid-season replacement for Gene Autry's The Adventures of Champion. Both series failed in the ratings against ABC's The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin.

Frank Lovejoy American actor

Frank Andrew Lovejoy Jr. was an American actor in radio, film, and television. He is perhaps best remembered for appearing in the film noir The Hitch-Hiker and for starring in the radio drama Night Beat.

In July 1957, Beaumont played a sympathetic characterization of the Western bandit Jesse James on the series Tales of Wells Fargo . Two months later, he was cast in his best-known role as the wise suburban father Ward Cleaver on the sitcom Leave It to Beaver. During that series' six seasons, Beaumont also wrote and directed several episodes, including the final one, "Family Scrapbook". [1] In 2014, in recognition of his performances as head of the Cleaver household, TV Guide ranked Beaumont number 28 on its list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time". [7]

In 1959, just before Beaumont began filming the third season of Leave It to Beaver, he flew from his home in Minnesota to Hollywood while his wife, son, and mother-in-law traveled to California by car. An accident on the road killed his mother-in-law and severely injured his son. [8] Jerry Mathers later stated that the tragedy seriously affected Beaumont's participation in the production at the time, with Beaumont often just "walking" through his part. [9]

After Leave It to Beaver ended production and went into syndication in the fall of 1963, Beaumont appeared in many community theater productions and played a few guest roles on such television series as Mannix , The Virginian , Wagon Train , and Petticoat Junction . [1] In February 1966, 11 years after his first appearance on Lassie , he again guest- starred on that popular series, performing in the episode "Cradle of the Deep". [1] He also continued to have success as a writer, selling several television screenplays and radio scripts, as well as short stories to various magazines. [10]

Following his retirement from show business in the late 1960s, Beaumont launched a second career as a Christmas-tree farmer in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. He was forced to retire from that business in 1972 after suffering a stroke from which he never fully recovered.

Personal life and death

Beaumont married only once. In Los Angeles on Easter Sunday, April 13, 1941, he wed actress Kathryn Adams (née Hohn) at the Hollywood Congregational Church. [11] Their union lasted 33 years, until their divorce in 1974. [12] They had three children: Hunter, Kristy, and Mark.

On May 14, 1982, Beaumont died of a heart attack while visiting his son, a psychologist working in Munich, in what was then West Germany. [10] His body was cremated, and the ashes were scattered on the then family-owned island on Lake Wabana, Minnesota, near Grand Rapids. The 1983 telemovie Still the Beaver is dedicated to Beaumont.

In the early 1980s, a Texas punk rock band combined the actor's name with the name of Jimi Hendrix's band to form The Hugh Beaumont Experience.

Filmography

YearTitleRoleOther cast membersNotesRefs.
1940 Phantom Raiders Seaman Walter Pidgeon Uncredited [13]
The Secret Seven Southern Racketeer Barton MacLane, Florence Rice Uncredited [14]
1941 South of Panama Paul Martin Duncan Renaldo, Virginia Vale [15]
The Cowboy and the Blonde Sound Man George Montgomery, Mary Beth Hughes Uncredited [16]
Private Nurse McDonald Jane Darwell Uncredited [17]
Unfinished Business Hugh, the Bridegroom Irene Dunne, Robert Montgomery Uncredited [18]
Week-End in Havana Clipper Officer Alice Faye, Carmen Miranda, John Payne, Cesar Romero Uncredited [19]
1942 Right to the Heart Willie Donovan Brenda Joyce [20]
Unseen Enemy Narrator Leo Carrillo, Irene Hervey, Don Terry [21]
Young America G-Man Jane Withers [22]
Canal Zone Radio Operator Chester Morris, Harriet Hilliard, Lloyd Bridges Uncredited [23]
To the Shores of Tripoli Orderly Maureen O'Hara, Randolph Scott Uncredited [24]
The Wife Takes a Flyer Officer Joan Bennett, Franchot Tone Uncredited [25]
Top Sergeant Radio NewscasterVoice, Uncredited
Flight Lieutenant John McGinnis Glenn Ford, Pat O'Brien, Evelyn Keyes Uncredited [26]
Wake Island Captain Brian Donlevy, Macdonald Carey Uncredited [27]
Northwest Rangers Warren - Mountie who finds Fowler's body James Craig, John Carradine Uncredited [28]
1943 Flight for Freedom Flight Instructor Rosalind Russell, Fred MacMurray Uncredited [29]
He Hired the Boss Jordan Stu Erwin [30]
Bombardier SoldierPat O'Brien, Randolph ScottUncredited [31]
Du Barry Was a Lady Footman Red Skelton, Lucille Ball Uncredited [32]
Good Luck, Mr. Yates Adjutant Claire Trevor Uncredited [33]
Mexican Spitfire's Blessed Event George Sharpe Lupe Vélez [34]
Salute to the Marines Sergeant Wallace Beery Uncredited [35]
The Fallen Sparrow Otto Skaas John Garfield [36]
The Seventh Victim Gregory Ward Tom Conway [37]
There's Something About a Soldier Lt. MartinEvelyn Keyes [38]
1944 The Racket Man "Irish" Duffy Tom Neal [39]
The Story of Dr. Wassell aide to Admiral Hart in Surabaya Gary Cooper, Signe Hasso [40]
Song of the Open Road John Moran Edgar Bergen Uncredited
Mr. Winkle Goes to War Ranger Officer Edward G. Robinson Uncredited [41]
The Seventh Cross Truck Driver Spencer Tracy, Jessica Tandy, Hume Cronyn Uncredited [42]
I Love a Soldier John Moran Paulette Goddard, Sonny Tufts Uncredited [43]
Strange Affair Detective Carey Allyn Joslyn Uncredited [44]
They Live in Fear Instructor Otto Kruger Uncredited [45]
Practically Yours Film-Cutter Cecil Kellaway Uncredited [46]
1945 Objective, Burma! Captain Hennessey Errol Flynn Uncredited
Blood on the Sun Johnny Clarke James Cagney, Sylvia Sidney Uncredited [47]
Counter-Attack Russian Lieutenant Paul Muni, Marguerite Chapman Uncredited [48]
The Lady Confesses Larry Craig Mary Beth Hughes [49]
Blonde from Brooklyn Discharging Lieutenant Lynn Merrick, Robert Stanton Uncredited [50]
You Came Along Chaplain Robert Cummings, Lizabeth Scott Uncredited [51]
Apology for Murder Kenny Blake Ann Savage [52]
You Came Along Chaplain Robert Cummings, Lizabeth Scott Uncredited [53]
1946 Murder Is My Business Michael ShayneCheryl Walker [54]
Johnny Comes Flying Home Engineer Richard Crane Uncredited [55]
The Blue Dahlia George Copeland Veronica Lake, Alan Ladd, Howard Da Silva, William Bendix [56]
Larceny in Her Heart Michael Shayne Cheryl Walker [57]
Blonde for a Day Michael Shayne Kathryn Adams [58]
1947 The Guilt of Janet Ames Frank Merino Melvyn Douglas, Sid Caesar Uncredited [59]
Three on a Ticket Michael ShayneCheryl Walker [60]
Too Many Winners Michael Shayne Trudy Marshall [61]
Railroaded! Police Sgt. Mickey Ferguson John Ireland [62]
Bury Me Dead Michael Dunn Cathy O'Donnell, June Lockhart [63]
1948 Reaching from Heaven Bill StarlingCheryl Walker [64]
Money Madness Steve Clark (previously known as Freddie Howard) Frances Rafferty [65]
The Counterfeiters Phillip Drake John Sutton [66]
1949 Tokyo Joe Provost Marshal Major Humphrey Bogart, Sessue Hayakawa Uncredited [67]
1950 Second Chance Dr. Emory Ruth Warrick [68]
The Flying Missile Major Wilson Glenn Ford Uncredited [69]
1951 Target Unknown Colonel Mark Stevens Uncredited [70]
The Last Outpost Lt. Fenton Ronald Reagan [71]
Danger Zone Dennis O'Brien Edward Brophy [72]
Go for Broke! Chaplain Van Johnson Uncredited [73]
Roaring City Denny O'BrienEdward Brophy [74]
Pier 23 Dennis O'BrienEdward Brophy [75]
Home Town Story Bob MacFarland Donald Crisp Uncredited [76]
Savage DrumsBill FentonWilliam BerkeUncredited
Mr. Belvedere Rings the Bell Policeman Clifton Webb Uncredited [77]
Lost Continent Robert PhillipsCaesar Romero [78]
Callaway Went Thataway Mr. Adkins, Attorney Dorothy McGuire Uncredited [79]
Overland Telegraph Brad Roberts Tim Holt [80]
1952 Phone Call from a Stranger Dr. Tim Brooks Shelley Winters Uncredited [81]
Bugles in the Afternoon Lt. Cooke Ray Milland Uncredited [82]
Wild Stallion Capt. Wilmurt Ben Johnson [83]
Washington Story Chaplain Van Johnson Uncredited [84]
Night Without Sleep John Harkness Linda Darnell [85]
The Member of the Wedding Minister Ethel Waters Uncredited [86]
1953 The Mississippi Gambler Kennerly Tyrone Power Uncredited [87]
225,000 Mile Proving Ground, 1953 Narrator/reporter E.D. GillespieProduced by Dudley Pictures for American Association of Railroads
1955 Indian American Brother DavidTom Selden, Michael Whalen TV Movie [88]
Hell's Horizon Al Trask John Ireland [89]
1956 The Revolt of Mamie Stover San Francisco Policeman Jane Russell Uncredited [90]
The Mole People Dr. Jud Bellamin John Agar [91]
1957 Night Passage Jeff Kurth Audie Murphy, James Stewart, Dan Duryea [92]
1965 The Human Duplicators Austin Welles George Nader, Barbara Nichols [93]

Television credits

YearSeriesRoleEpisode(s)Refs.
1950 The Silver Theatre Harry HamiltonLady with Ideas
1951 The Bigelow Theatre Harry HamiltonLady with Ideas
1952 Dangerous Assignment DeanThe Piece of String Story
Dangerous AssignmentSaundersThe Manger Story
Dangerous AssignmentBill KaneThe Assassin Ring Story
Hopalong Cassidy Hank ScofieldThe Feud
1952–1953 Racket Squad Narrator33 episodes
1953 Ford Theatre Sheriff BurnsThe Trestle
Letter to Loretta Arthur NichollsThe Bronte Story
Big Town Carl Kesten / Rodney MitchellThe Eliminator
Chevron Theatre The Worthless Thing
The Lone Ranger Rev. Randy RobertsThe Godless Men
Topper Ed MerrillThe Spinster
Adventures of Superman Dan GraysonThe Big Squeeze
Fireside Theatre The Traitor
Four Star Playhouse No Identity
Four Star PlayhouseAlbert WoodsThe Adolescent
Schlitz Playhouse of Stars John HarrisVacation for Ginny
Schlitz Playhouse of StarsGuardian of the Clock
1954Fireside TheatreFight Night
City Detective Philip MerriamThe Blonde Orchid
WaterfrontRoy MartinBackwash
The Lineup Charles LanskiCop Shooting
Studio 57 Charles CraneTrap Mates
The Public Defender Ed McGrathThink No Evil
The Public DefenderGil BowmanLost Cause
Cavalcade of America Lewis GrahamThe Paper Sword
Lux Video Theatre GeorgeCall Me Mrs.
1955Letter to LorettaArnieMan in the Ring
Letter to LorettaRev. BellDateline: Korea
Letter to LorettaHenry PrestonThe Refinement of 'Ab'
Letter to LorettaEditor of Manhattan MagazineThe Girl Who Knew
Four Star PlayhousePadreThe Firing Squad
Four Star PlayhouseDr. LindellThe Frightened Woman
Four Star PlayhousePadreThe Firing Squa
The Public DefenderEd McGrathA Knowledge of Astronomy
Medic Col. Will RobertsThe World So High
Crossroads Rev. Clifton R. PondWith All My Love
Science Fiction Theatre Dr. Guy StantonConversation with an Ape
The Millionaire Dr. PorterThe Walter Carter Story
The Pepsi-Cola Playhouse JeffStake My Life
The Touch of Steel Col. LanderTV movie
Cavalcade of AmericaCoach Jack CodyA Time for Courage
Climax! The Leaf Out of the Book
Lassie Mr. SaundersThe Well
1956Schlitz Playhouse of StarsTom SuttonWeb of Circumstance
Climax!Savage Portrait
Four Star PlayhouseDoctorCommand
Ford TheatreMarshal FergusonThe Silent Strangers
Lux Video TheatreLarryThe Unfaithful
Cavalcade of AmericaFather WerrThe Boy Who Walked to America
Letter to LorettaChris PalmerTake Care of My Child
Letter to LorettaJackBut for God's Grace
My Friend Flicka SimmonsOne Man's Horse
My Friend FlickaNight Rider
Alias Mike HerculesMike HerculesPilot
Matinee Theatre The 25th Hour
Celebrity Playhouse Home Is the Soldier
1957 Meet McGraw Clay FarrellBorder City
Tales of Wells Fargo Jesse JamesJesse James
1957–1963 Leave it to Beaver Ward CleaverRun of the series [94]
1964 Wagon Train Jed HalickThe Pearlie Garnet Story
1966 Lassie Jim / Mr. SaundersCradle of the Deep
The Virginian MaguireGirl on the Glass Mountain
Petticoat Junction Ronnie BeckmanEvery Bachelor Should Have a Family
1967Petticoat JunctionMr. Donald ElliottWith This Gown I Thee Wed
Petticoat JunctionMr. Donald ElliottMeet the In-Laws
1968The VirginianMaj. James CarltonNora
The VirginianCharles MartinWith Help from Ulysses
Mannix Frank AbbottTo the Swiftest, Death
1970MannixHammondThe Mouse That Died
MannixMr. CalderWar of Nerves
Medical Center Dr. SimpsonDeath Grip
Marcus Welby, M.D. Jim WagnerThe "Merely" Syndrome (1970)
1971 The Most Deadly Game Dr. DominickThe Classic Burial Position, (final television appearance)

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References

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  13. "Phantom Raiders". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  14. "The Secret Seven". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  15. "South of Panama". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  16. "The Cowboy and the Blonde". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  17. "Private Nurse". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  18. "Unfinished Business". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  19. "Week-End in Havana". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  20. "Right to the Heart". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  21. "Unseen Enemy". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  22. "Young America". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  23. "Canal Zone". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  24. "To the Shores of Tripoli". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  25. "The Wife Takes a Flyer". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  26. "Flight Lieutenant". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  27. "Wake Island". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  28. "Northwest Rangers". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  29. "Flight for Freedom". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  30. "He Hired the Boss". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  31. "Bombardier". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  32. "Du Barry Was a Lady". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  33. "Good Luck, Mr. Yates". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  34. "Mexican Spitfire's Blessed Event". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  35. "Salute to the Marines". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  36. "The Fallen Sparrow". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  37. "The Seventh Victim". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  38. "There's Something About a Soldier". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  39. "The Racket Man". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  40. "The Story of Dr. Wassel". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  41. "Mr. Winkle Goes to War". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  42. "The Seventh Cross". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  43. "I Love a Soldier". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  44. "Strange Affair". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  45. "They Live in Fear". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  46. "Practically Yours". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  47. "Blood on the Sun". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  48. "Counter-Attack". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  49. "The Lady Confesses". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  50. "Blonde from Brooklyn". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  51. "You Came Along". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  52. "Apology for Murder". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  53. "You Came Along". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  54. "Murder is My Business". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  55. "Johnny Comes Flying Home". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  56. "The Blue Dahlia". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  57. "Larceny in Her Heart". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  58. "Blonde for a Day". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  59. "The Guilt of Janet Ames". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  60. "Three on a Ticket". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  61. "Too Many Winners". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  62. "Railroaded!". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  63. "Bury Me Dead". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  64. "Reaching from Heaven". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  65. "Money Madness". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  66. "The Counterfeiters". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  67. "Tokyo Joe". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  68. "Second Chance". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  69. "The Flying Missile". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  70. "Target Unknown". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  71. "The Last Outpost". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  72. "Danger Zone". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  73. "Go for Broke!". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  74. "Roaring City". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  75. "Pier 23". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  76. "Home Town Story". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  77. "Mr. Belvedere Rings the Bell". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  78. "Lost Continent". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  79. "Callaway Went Thataway". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  80. "Overland Telegraph". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  81. "Phone Call from a Stranger". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  82. "Bugles in the Afternoon". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  83. "Wild Stallion". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  84. "Washington Story". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  85. "Night Without Sleep". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  86. "The Member of the Wedding". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  87. "The Mississippi Gambler". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 3, 2015.
  88. "Indian American". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  89. "Hell's Horizon". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  90. "The Mole People". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  91. "The Mole People". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  92. "Night Passage". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  93. "The Human Duplicators". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. AFI. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  94. Brooks, Marsh (2007), 778–779

Further reading