Hugh Guthrie

Last updated

1900 Canadian federal election: Wellington South
Hugh Guthrie
PC KC
Hugh Guthrie (cropped).png
Leader of the Opposition
In office
1926–1927
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Hugh Guthrie 2,75551.02.4
Conservative Christian Kloepfer 2,64949.0-2.4
Total valid votes 5,404100.0
1904 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Hugh Guthrie 3,69452.71.7
Conservative Christian Kloepfer 3,31547.3-1.7
Total valid votes 7,009100.0
1908 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Hugh Guthrie 3,87355.02.3
Conservative John Newstead3,17245.0-2.3
Total valid votes 7,045100.0
1911 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Hugh Guthrie 3,36855.10.1
Conservative Arthur Thomas Kelly Evans2,74444.9-0.1
Total valid votes 6,112100.0
1917 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Government (Unionist) Hugh Guthrie 7,35877.5
Labour Lorne Cunningham2,13922.5
Total valid votes 9,497100.0
1921 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hugh Guthrie 6,20836.6-40.9
Labour James Singer6,07735.913.4
Liberal Samuel Carter4,66227.527.5
Total valid votes 16,947100.0
1925 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hugh Guthrie 9,09652.916.3
Liberal Robert Gladstone 8,08847.111.1
Total valid votes 17,184100.0
1926 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hugh Guthrie 8,51553.30.4
Liberal William A. Burnett7,47146.7-0.4
Total valid votes 15,986100.0
1930 Canadian federal election : Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Hugh Guthrie 8,88753.0-0.3
Liberal John Burr Mitchell7,89347.00.3
Total valid votes 16,780100.0
By-election: On Mr. Guthrie being appointed Minister of Justice, 25 August 1930: Wellington South
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
  Conservative Hugh Guthrie acclaimed

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References

  1. "Hugh Guthrie". Canadian Heraldic Authority. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
Parliament of Canada
Preceded by Member of Parliament from Wellington South
1900–1935
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by
Arthur Meighen (acting)
Solicitor General of Canada
1917–1921
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Militia and Defence
1920-1921
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of National Defence
1926
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
1926
Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition
1926–1927
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
1930-1935
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by Leader of the Conservative Party
1926–1927
Interim
Succeeded by