Hugh Taylor (American football)

Last updated
Hugh Taylor
Hugh Taylor - 1948 Bowman.jpg
Taylor on a 1948 Bowman football card
No. 84, 28
Position: End
Personal information
Born:(1923-07-06)July 6, 1923
Wynne, Arkansas
Died:November 1, 1992(1992-11-01) (aged 69)
Wynne, Arkansas
Career information
College: Oklahoma City
Undrafted: 1947
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receiving yards:5,233
Average:19.2
Touchdowns:58
Player stats at NFL.com

Hugh Wilson "Bones" Taylor (July 6, 1923 – November 1, 1992) was an American football player and coach. He played as an end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Washington Redskins. Taylor attended Tulane University at the start of World War II where he was a Navy V-12 student. At Tulane he was an All-Southeastern Conference and All-American basketball player in 1943. [1] After being discharged from the U.S. Navy in 1946, he played college football at Oklahoma City College before entering the NFL in 1947. In his first NFL game, he gained 212 yards receiving, setting league records for an NFL debut and first game of the season. Those records were broken by Anquan Boldin in 2003 and Frank Clarke in 1962, respectively. As a member of the Redskins from 1947 to 1954, the 6-foot-4-inch Taylor made the Pro Bowl in 1952 and 1954.

Contents

Following his playing career, Taylor coached in the college and professional ranks. After two seasons as an assistant at Florida State University, he served as the head football coach at Arkansas State College—now known as Arkansas State University from 1958 to 1959, compiling a record of 7–11. While at Arkansas State, he was initiated into the Sigma Pi fraternity chapter there. [1] Taylor then moved to the American Football League (AFL), as an assistant coach with the New York Titans from 1960 to 1962 and with the San Diego Chargers in 1963. He was an assistant for the Houston Oilers for one season before succeeding Sammy Baugh as head coach in 1965. The Oilers went 4–10 in 1965, resulting in Taylor's dismissal at the end of the season. Taylor coached receivers for the Pittsburgh Steelers of the NFL from 1966 to 1968. In 1969, he coached the Spokane Shockers of the Continental Football League. The Shockers were owned by Taylor's former Redskins teammate, Ed Justice. With the Shockers Taylor coached Ken Stabler, a rookie quarterback late signed by the Oakland Raiders.

Taylor died on November 1, 1992. [2]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Arkansas State Indians (NCAA College Division independent)(1958–1959)
1958 Arkansas State4–5
1959 Arkansas State3–6
Arkansas State:7–11
Total:7–11

NFL

TeamYearRegular SeasonPost Season
WonLostTiesWin %FinishWonLostWin %Result
HOU 1965 4100.2864th in AFL East---
Total4100.286

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References

  1. 1 2 Wright, Bert (Spring 1959). "Alpha Pi: Arkansas State College" (PDF). The Emerald of Sigma Pi. Vol. 46 no. 1. pp. 40–41.
  2. "Hugh (Bones) Taylor; Football Player and Coach, 69". The New York Times . November 3, 1992. Retrieved July 30, 2016.