Humphrey Minchin

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Humphrey Minchin (1727–1796) was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1778 and 1796.

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

Minchin was the eldest son of Paul Minchin of Ballinakill, King’s County and his wife Henrietta Bunbury, daughter of Joseph Bunbury of Johnstown, county Carlow. He entered Trinity College, Dublin on January 11th, 1742, at the age of 14. He married Clarinda Cuppidge, daughter of George Cuppidge of Dublin on 4 August 1750. [1]

Ballinakill Town in Leinster, Ireland

Ballinakill is a small village in County Laois, Ireland on the R432 regional road between Abbeyleix, Ballyragget and Castlecomer, Co Kilkenny

In 1774 Minchin canvassed Wootton Bassett but withdrew without becoming a candidate. He was elected Member of Parliament for Okehampton at a by-election on 11 June 1778 on the interest of John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer. He was re-elected after a contest in 1780. In 1783 from April to December he was Clerk of the Ordnance. He was nominated again by the Spencer family at Okehampton in the 1784 general election. Although he was defeated, he petitioned and was seated on 27 April 1785. Spencer intended giving up his interest at Okehampton at the next election and made this clear to Minchin in the autumn of 1787 allowing him to keep the seat until the dissolution. [1]

Wootton Bassett was a parliamentary borough in Wiltshire, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons from 1447 until 1832, when the rotten borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

Okehampton was a parliamentary borough in Devon, which elected two Members of Parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons in 1301 and 1313, then continuously from 1640 to 1832, when the borough was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer British peer and politician

John Spencer, 1st Earl Spencer was a British peer and politician.

At the 1790 general election Minchin was returned for Bossiney, a seat that its patron Lord Mount Edgcumbe put at the disposal of government supporters. Minchin had given his support to Pitt and in return constantly bothered him throughout the Parliament for an Irish peerage, which never materialized. [2]

1790 British general election

The 1790 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 17th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707.

Bossiney was a parliamentary constituency in Cornwall, one of a number of Cornish rotten boroughs, and returned two Members of Parliament to the British House of Commons from 1552 until 1832, when it was abolished by the Great Reform Act.

George Edgcumbe, 1st Earl of Mount Edgcumbe Royal Navy admiral

George Edgcumbe, 1st Earl of Mount Edgcumbe, PC was a British peer, naval officer and politician.

Minchin died very suddenly on 26 March 1796 from a fit while hanging up his hat before dinner. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 "MINCHIN, Humphrey (1727-96), of Holywell, Droxford, Hants". History of Parliament Online (1754-1790). Retrieved 9 October 2017.
  2. 1 2 "MINCHIN, Humphrey (1727-96), of Holywell, Droxford, Hants". History of Parliament Online (1790-1820). Retrieved 4 December 2017.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Richard Vernon
Alexander Wedderburn
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
1778–1784
With: Richard Vernon
Succeeded by
John Luxmoore
Thomas Wiggens
Preceded by
John Luxmoore
Thomas Wiggens
Member of Parliament for Okehampton
1785–1790
With: Viscount Malden
Succeeded by
Colonel John St Leger
Robert Ladbroke
Preceded by
Hon. Charles Stuart
Matthew Montagu
Member of Parliament for Bossiney
1790–1796
With: Hon. James Archibald Stuart
Succeeded by
Hon. Evelyn Pierrepont
Hon. James Archibald Stuart