Hunchun

Last updated
Hunchun

珲春市 · 훈춘시

Hun-ch'un
Hunch007.jpg
A street in Hunchun
ChinaYanbianHunchun.png
Hunchun in Yanbian
China Jilin location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Hunchun
Location of the city center in Jilin
Coordinates: 42°51′47″N130°21′58″E / 42.863°N 130.366°E / 42.863; 130.366 Coordinates: 42°51′47″N130°21′58″E / 42.863°N 130.366°E / 42.863; 130.366
Country People's Republic of China
Province Jilin
Prefecture Yanbian
Seat Xin'an Subdistrict
Area
[1]
   County-level city 5,145.4 km2 (1,986.7 sq mi)
  Urban
125.39 km2 (48.41 sq mi)
Elevation
41 m (135 ft)
Population
 (2017) [1]
   County-level city 271,000
  Density53/km2 (140/sq mi)
   Urban
216,300
Time zone UTC+8 (China Standard)
Postal code
133300
Hunchun
Simplified Chinese 珲春
Traditional Chinese 琿春
Chinese Korean name
Chosŏn'gŭl
South Korean name
Hangul

Hunchun is a county-level city in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture, far eastern Jilin province. It borders North Korea (North Hamgyong province) and Russia (Primorsky Krai), has over 250,000 inhabitants, and covers 5,145 square kilometers. [2] [3] The site of the eastern capital of Balhae/Bohai Kingdom between 785–793, Donggyeong, was located here.

Contents

The city's name Hunchun comes from Huncun in Manchu language. (Manchu :ᡥᡠᠨᠴᡠᠨ; Möllendorff : huncun; Abkai : hunqun). [4]

The city and the village Fangchuan is located near the point of junction of the borders of China, Russia, and North Korea; provided with an observation platform, it is a popular tourist attraction. [5]

Administrative divisions

Hunchun (labelled as Hun-ch'un Hun Chun 
) (1954) Txu-oclc-6614383-nk52-6.jpg
Hunchun (labelled as Hun-ch'un 琿春) (1954)
Map including Hunchun (labeled as HUN-CH`UN) (AMS, 1967) Txu-oclc-6654394-nk-52-4th-ed.jpg
Map including Hunchun (labeled as HUN-CHʻUN) (AMS, 1967)

Hunchun has four subdistricts, four towns, and five townships. [6]

Subdistricts:

Towns:

Townships:

Economy

Since the early 1990s, the Chinese government invested a lot in transforming Hunchun into a regional economic center, thanks in large part to the influence of the former Jilin governor Wang Zhongyu, whose work with Zhu Rongji allowed him to become the first head of China's State Economic and Trade Commission. [7] On 9 March 1992 the Chinese parliament approved to set up Hunchun Border Economic Cooperation Zone. The national government and Jilin provincial government have invested in succession over four billion yuan in Hunchun through the 1990s. [8]

On 16 March 2013, a joint agreement to export textiles to North Korea was announced. [9] [10] The textiles would be made into up to 8,000 shirts in North Korea and exported back to China. [9] [10]

Hunchun Border Economic Cooperation Zone was approved to be national-level border economic cooperation zone in 1992, with a planning area of 24 km2 (9.3 sq mi). In 2002 and 2001, Hunchun Export Processing Zone and Hunchun Sino-Russia Trade Zone was set up in it. Being located in the junction of China, Russia, and Korea, it enjoys a strategic location. The city focuses on the development of sea food processing, electronic product manufacture, bio-pharmacy, textile industry and other industries. [11]

Hunchun Export Processing Zone is located in 5 km2 (1.9 sq mi) area in Hunchun Border Economic Cooperation Zone. Its planned area is 2.44 km2 (0.94 sq mi). It enjoys good infrastructure and policies as its parent zone does. [12]

Transport

In the early 1990s, Jilin province government constructed a railway and improved the highway to Hunchun. The Tumen River Bridge connects between Hunchun and the North Korean village of Wonjeong (원정) in Sonbong County. The bridge was built during the Japanese occupation in 1938. In 2010 the bridge was renovated as part of an agreement between North Korea and China to modernize the Rason port in North Korea. [13] In addition, a new railway line was constructed which links Hunchun and Makhalino (a station on the Ussuriysk-Khasan line, 41 km (25 mi) before Khasan) in Russia and began operating in February 2000. [14] Hunchun port is 42 km (26 mi) from Posyet and 63 km (39 mi) from Zarubino port towns of Russia.

The Jilin–Hunchun intercity railway, a 250-km/h high-speed passenger rail line from Jilin to Hunchun via Tumen (吉图珲铁路客运专线), began construction work in January 2011, and was scheduled and finished at the end of September 2015. [15] [16] The railway has been described as "Dongbei's most beautiful railway" (due to the terrain it runs through) and "the fastest way to Vladivostok" (4 hours by train from Shenyang to Hunchun, plus four hours by bus from Hunchun to Vladivostok). [17] Reflecting the border location of the city, the train station has its sign in four languages: Chinese, Korean, Russian, and English. [5]

Hunchun, China.jpg

Related Research Articles

Jilin Province of China

Jilin is one of the three provinces of Northeast China. Its capital and largest city is Changchun. Jilin borders North Korea and Russia to the east, Heilongjiang to the north, Liaoning to the south, and Inner Mongolia to the west.

Kaiyuan, Liaoning County-level city in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Kaiyuan is a county-level city in the northeast of Liaoning, People's Republic of China, bordering Jilin for a small section to the north. It is under the administration of Tieling City, the centre of which lies 33 kilometres (21 mi) to the southwest.

Jiutai District District in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Jiutai is one of seven districts of the prefecture-level city of Changchun, the capital of Jilin Province, Northeast China. The district is surrounded by agricultural areas and is located around 50 kilometres (31 mi) northeast of downtown Changchun. Coal mining also is present in Jiutai. It borders Dehui to the north, Erdao District to the southwest, Kuancheng District to the west, as well as the prefecture-level city of Jilin to the south and east.

Gongzhuling County-level & Sub-prefectural city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Gongzhuling is a county-level city under the administration of Changchun. It is located in western Jilin province of Northeast China, halfway between Siping and Changchun, along the main railway line in the Northeast. Major employers in the city include Jilin Academy of Agricultural Sciences, located on the north side of the railway and several factories which manufacture auto parts. There is major military presence in the area, including a PLA base and a military airport.

Acheng District District in Heilongjiang, Peoples Republic of China

Acheng District, formerly Acheng City, is one of nine districts of the prefecture-level city of Harbin, the capital of Heilongjiang Province, Northeast China, covering part of the southeastern suburbs. The district was approved to establish from the former Acheng City (阿城市) by the Chinese State Council on August 15, 2006. As of 2010, it had a population of 596,856 residing in an area of 2,680 km2 (1,030 sq mi), and is 29 km (18 mi) southeast of downtown Harbin, 190 km (120 mi) north of Jilin City, and around 50 km (31 mi) south of the Songhua River. It lies within the basin of and until 1909 was considered synonymous with the Ashi River which gave its name to the Jurchen Jin Dynasty. The district administers nine subdistricts, eight towns, one township, and one ethnic township. It borders Daowai District to the north, Bin County to the northeast, Shangzhi to the southeast, and Wuchang to the south, Shuangcheng District to the west, and Pingfang and Xiangfang Districts to the northwest.

Longjing, Jilin County-level city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Longjing is a city in Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture, southeastern Jilin province, Northeast China. It lies on the Tumen River opposite the North Korean city Hoeryong.

Meihekou County-level & Sub-prefectural city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Meihekou is a city of 600,000 in Jilin province, People's Republic of China. It is a regional transport hub, connecting three railway lines, all of which are single track, and 2 national highways. The city is also a major lorry transshipment point in the region as it is also the junction of two trunk roads, connected to Liaoyuan in the northwest. The city is administratively a county-level city of the prefecture-level city of Tonghua, and is its northernmost county-level division.

Beipiao County-level city in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Beipiao is a city in Chaoyang prefecture, Liaoning province, in Northeast China. It has a population of 202,807. The main industry in the area is coal mining. With vertical shafts of almost 1000m, these are some of the deepest coal mines in China. The coal produced is used for coking. Daheishan National Forest Park is located in the northwestern part of Beipiao city.

Dunhua County-level city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Dunhua is a county-level city of the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture in southeastern Jilin province, People's Republic of China. It has more than 480,000 inhabitants and was the capital of Balhae between 742−756, known at the time as "Junggyeong". During the Qing Dynasty it was called Áodōng (敖东) in Chinese and Odoli in Manchu.

Jian, Jilin County-level city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Ji'an is a county-level city in the southwestern part of Jilin province, People's Republic of China. It is administered by the prefecture-level city of Tonghua and is the southernmost county-level division in the province. Ji'an has an area of 3,408 km2 (1,316 sq mi) and a population of approximately 230,000. The city was given its current status in 1988. Ji'an is separated from Manpo, Chagang Province, North Korea by the Yalu River; it has an international border running 203.5 km (126.4 mi).

Huanren Manchu Autonomous County Autonomous county in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Huanren Manchu Autonomous County, formerly Huairen County, is a county under the administration of Benxi City, in eastern Liaoning province, People's Republic of China, bordering Jilin to the east. It is also one of 11 Manchu autonomous counties and one of 117 autonomous counties nationally. As a county, Huanren was established in 1877. It was reorganised as an autonomous county in 1989 with approval of the State Council. The county covers 3,362 square kilometres (1,298 sq mi) and has 293,505 population, and Huanren Town is its seat.

Hunnan District District in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Hunnan District, formerly Dongling District one of ten districts of the prefecture-level city of Shenyang, the capital of Liaoning Province, Northeast China, and forms part of the eastern and southeastern suburbs. The district contains 12 subdistricts of Shenyang proper, six towns, one rural township, and one ethnic rural township. It borders Shenbei New Area to the north, Sujiatun to the south, Heping to the west, and Shenhe and Dadong to the northwest; it also borders the prefecture-level city of Fushun to the east.

Boli County County in Heilongjiang, Peoples Republic of China

Boli is a county of southeastern Heilongjiang province, People's Republic of China. It is the only county of the prefecture-level city of Qitaihe, the downtown area of which is about 32 kilometres (20 mi) to the east of the county seat.

Longtan District, Jilin City District in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Longtan District is a district of Jilin City, Jilin, People's Republic of China.

Shuangliao County-level city in Jilin, Peoples Republic of China

Shuangliao is a city in western Jilin, People's Republic of China, bordering Liaoning and Inner Mongolia. It is under the administration of Siping City.

Donggang, Liaoning County-level city in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Donggang is a city in the southeast of Liaoning Province in Northeast China. Situated on the coast of the Yellow Sea at the mouth of the Yalu River, it is located near the maritime border with North Korea. Administratively, it is a county-level city of Dandong, the downtown of which lies 35 kilometres (22 mi) to the northeast.

Linghai County-level city in Liaoning, Peoples Republic of China

Linghai is a county-level city in the west of Liaoning province, Northeast China. It was called Jinxian or Jin County until 1993, when it was upgraded to a city and renamed Linghai. Lying on the west (right) bank of the Daling River, which flows into the Liaodong Bay near the city, it is under the administration of the prefecture-level city of Jinzhou, the seat of which is 21 kilometres (13 mi).

References

  1. 1 2 Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, ed. (2019). China Urban Construction Statistical Yearbook 2017. Beijing: China Statistics Press. p. 50. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  2. North Korean Economy Watch > News and analysis of the North Korean economy [ permanent dead link ]
  3. "News and analysis of the North Korean economy : Koryolink continues to expand customer base". North Korean Economy Watch. November 17, 2009.
  4. Emperor of Qing Dynesty (1771). 御製增訂清文鑑·卷十·人部一人類一·滿洲[Enlarged and Revised Manchu Dictionary written by the Emperor of Qing (han -i araha nonggime toktobuha manju gisun -i buleku bithe, juwanci debtelin, niyalmai šošohon uju, niyalmai hacin uju, manju, 4-ci afaha)] (in Manchu). 10, Human-beings 1. p. 4.
  5. 1 2 Schmitz, Rob (November 16, 2015). "China's Frontier Towns > China bets big on border town with Russia, North Korea". Minnesota Public Radio.
  6. 延边朝鲜族自治州-行政区划网 www.xzqh.org (in Chinese). xzqh.org. Retrieved 2011-04-28.
  7. Cotton, James (Nov 1996), "China and Tumen River Cooperation: Jilin's Coastal Development Strategy", Asian Survey, 36, Berkeley: University of California Press, pp. 1086–1101.
  8. "A survey of Hunchun". Office of the TCDC/ECDC Network in China. Archived from the original on 2008-04-07. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  9. 1 2 Rank, Michael (March 16, 2013). "China signs first offshore processing agreement with North Korea". NK Economic Watch. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  10. 1 2 吉林对朝出境加工业务运行 (in Chinese). IDPRKorea.com. 2013-03-07. Archived from the original on 22 November 2014. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  11. RightSite.asia | Hunchun Border Economic Cooperation Zone
  12. RightSite.asia | Hunchun Export Processing Zone
  13. Bridge on China-North Korea border being renovated Archived 2010-04-19 at the Wayback Machine
  14. Kawamura, Kazumi. "Nine Transportation Corridors in Northeast Asia and Their Discontinuous Points". The Economic Research Institute for Northeast Asia. Archived from the original on 2014-05-06. Retrieved 2008-02-09.
  15. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-07-20. Retrieved 2010-10-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. 吉图珲铁路有望7月试运行. 2015-04-16.
  17. http://news.huochepiao.com/2015-6/2015626933445.htm