Hymne Monégasque

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Hymne Monégasque
English: Monégasque Anthem

National anthem of Flag of Monaco.svg  Monaco
Lyrics Louis Notari, 1931
Music Léon Jehin (orchestral arrangement), 1914
Adopted1848
Audio sample
Hymne Monégasque (instrumental)

"Hymne Monégasque" (English: "Monégasque Anthem") is national anthem of Monaco.

Contents

History

Théophile Bellando de Castro wrote the lyrics and composed the music of the 1st edition of "Hymne Monégasque" in 1841, later Castil-Blaze modified the melody and made several other minor changes. In 1848 the National Guard, created by Prince Florestan, adopted Bellando's song and it became the March of the National Loyalists. In 1896 Charles Albrecht composed a new arrangement for piano, published by Tihebaux in Paris and called Air National de Monaco; in 1897 Decourcelle of Nice, printed an edition called 429 Hymne National de Monaco for piano.

Years later, François Bellini orchestrated the song by Albrecht; this new arrangement for a trio was judged to be too long for people in 1900 and ceased being played. The modern version was created by Léon Jehin in 1914 and was played for the first time during the 25th anniversary of the beginning Prince Albert's reign. Finally in 1931 Louis Notari wrote the lyrics in the Monegasque language. Only the Monegasque lyrics are official, reportedly dating back to a request from the Prince. The current official lyrics contain only one verse, sung at the start of the song and repeated again near the end after an instrumental interlude in the middle. The national anthem is rarely sung aloud at all in Monaco, except at official occasions.

Current official lyrics

Monegasque lyricsFrench translationEnglish translation
A Marcia de Muneghu / Inu NactionaleHymne MonégasqueNational anthem
Despoei tugiù, sciü d'u nostru paise
Se ride aù ventu, u meme pavayun
Despoei tugiù a curù russa e gianca
E stà l'emblèma d'a nostra libertà
Grandi e piciui, l'an sempre respetà
Amu ch'üna tradiçiun,
Amu ch'üna religiun,
Amu avüu per u nostru unù
I meme Principi tugiù
E ren nun ne scangera
Tantu ch'u suriyu lüjerà;
Diu sempre n'agiüterà
E ren nun ne scangera
Depuis toujours, sur notre pays,
Le même drapeau est déployé au vent,
Depuis toujours les couleurs rouge et blanc
Sont le symbole de notre liberté
Grands et petits les ont toujours respectées.
Nous avons perpétué les mêmes traditions;
Nous célébrons la même religion;
Nous avons l'honneur
D'avoir toujours eu les mêmes Princes.
Et rien ne changera jamais
Tant que le soleil brillera;
Dieu nous aidera toujours
Et rien ne changera jamais.
Forever, in our land,
One flag has flown in the wind
Forever, the colours red and white
Have symbolised our liberty
Adults and children have always respected them.
We have perpetuated the same traditions;
We celebrate the same religion;
We have the honour
To have always had the same Princes.
And nothing will change
As long as the sun shines;
God will always help us
And nothing will change.

Full lyrics

Monegasque lyricsFrench translationEnglish translation

Despœ̍i tugiu̍ sciü d'u nostru paise
Se ride au ventu, u meme pavayu̍n
Despœ̍i tugiu̍ a curu̍ russa e gianca
E stà l'emblema, d'a nostra libertà

Grandi e i piciui, l'an sempre respetà
Oila cü ne toca!
Oila cü ne garda!
Fo che cadün sace ben aiço d'aiçi:

Riturnelu:
Amu avü sempre r'a meme tradiçiùn
Amu avü sempre r'a meme religiùn
Amu avüu per u nostru unù
I meme Prìncipi tugiù
E düsciün nun pura ne fa scangia
Tantu ch'au celu, u suriyu lüjerà;
Diu n'agiüterà
E mai düsciün nun pura ne
fa scangia
düsciün.

Nun sëmu pa gaire,
Ma defendëmu tüti a nostra tradiçiun;
Nun sëmu pa forti,
Ma se Diu voe n'agiütera!

Oila cü ne toca!
Oila cü ne garda!
Fo che cadün sace ben ailo d'aili:

Riturnelu

Depuis toujours, le même pavillon
Flotte joyeusement au vent de notre pays
Depuis toujours les couleurs rouge et blanc
Constituent le symbole de notre liberté

Grands et petits l'ont toujours respecté!
Ohé, vous qui nous voisinez!
Ohé, vous qui nous regardez!
Il importe que chacun retienne bien ceci:

Refrain :
Nous avons perpétué les mêmes traditions;
Nous célébrons la même religion;
Nous avons l'honneur
D'avoir toujours eu les mêmes Princes
Et personne ne pourra nous faire changer
tant que le soleil brillera dans le ciel
Dieu nous aidera
Et jamais personne ne pourra
nous faire changer
Personne.

Nous ne sommes pas bien nombreux,
Mais nous veillons tous à la défense de nos traditions;
Nous ne sommes pas très puissants,
Mais, s'il le veut, Dieu nous aidera !

Ohé, vous qui nous voisinez !
Ohé, vous qui nous regardez !
Il importe que chacun prenne bien conscience de cela ! Refrain

Historically, the same flag
Floats happily in the wind of our country
Always the colours red and white
Have been the symbol of our freedom

Great and small have always respected it!
Greetings, you who are our neighbours!
Greetings, you who are watching us!
It is important that everyone remembers the following:

Chorus:
We have perpetuated the same traditions;
We celebrate the same religion;
We have the honour
To have always had the same Princes
And no one can make us change
As long as the sun shines in the sky
God help us
And no one can ever
make us change
No one.

There are not very many of us,
But we all strive to defend our traditions;
We are not very powerful,
But if he wants to, God will help us!

Greetings, you who are our neighbours!
Greetings, you who are watching us!
It is important that everyone is well aware of that!

Chorus:

Original lyrics

French lyricsEnglish translation

Principauté Monaco ma patrie,
Oh! Combien Dieu est prodigue pour toi.
Ciel toujours pur, rives toujours fleuries,
Ton Souverain est plus aimé qu'un Roi.

Fiers Compagnons de la Garde Civique,
Respectons tous la voix du Commandant.
Suivons toujours notre bannière antique.
Le tambour bat, marchons tous en avant.

Oui, Monaco connut toujours des braves,
Nous sommes tous leurs dignes descendants.
En aucun temps nous ne fûmes esclaves.
Et loin de nous, régnèrent les tyrans.

Que le nom d'un Prince plein de clémence,
Soit répété par mille et mille chants.
Nous mourrons tous pour sa propre défense,
Mais après nous, combattront nos enfants.

Principality of Monaco my country
Oh! How God is lavish with you.
The sky always pure, the shores always blooming [with flowers],
Your Monarch is more revered than a King.

Proud Companions of the Civic Guard,
Let us all respect the voice of the Commander.
Always follow our old banner.
The drum beats, let us all walk ahead.

Yes, Monaco always had brave men,
We are all their worthy descendants.
Never were we slaves.
And far from us the tyrants ruled.

That the name of a merciful Prince
Be repeated by a thousand songs.
We shall all die in his own defense,
But after us, our children will fight.

See also

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