IIHF World Women's Championships

Last updated

IIHF World Women's Championships
Current season, competition or edition:
Hockey current event.svg 2019 Women's Ice Hockey World Championships
Sport Ice hockey
Founded 1990
No. of teams10 in the Top Division
12 in Division I
17 Division II
Most recent
champion(s)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States (9th title)
Most titlesFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada (10 titles)
Official website IIHF.com

The IIHF Ice Hockey Women's World Championship is the premier international tournament in women's ice hockey. It is governed by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

The International Ice Hockey Federation is a worldwide governing body for ice hockey and in-line hockey. It is based in Zurich, Switzerland, and has 76 members. It manages international ice hockey tournaments and maintains the IIHF World Ranking.

Contents

The official world competition was first held in 1990, with four more championships held in the 90's. [1] From 1989 to 1996, and in years that there was no world tournament held, there were European Championships and in 1995 and 1996 a Pacific Rim Championship. From the first Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Tournament in 1998 onward, the Olympic tournament was played instead of the IIHF Championships. As part of an effort to improve competition, the IIHF decided to hold Women's Championships in Olympic years, starting in 2014, but not at the top level. [2]

The IIHF European Women Championships is a former international competition of Women ice hockey between nations in Europe.

The IIHF Women's Pacific Rim Championships were IIHF-sanctioned international ice hockey tournaments held in 1995 and 1996. with teams from Canada, United States, China and Japan. In 1996, the tournament served as a qualifying tournament for the World Championship.

The 1998 Olympic women's ice hockey tournament was the first year that featured women in ice hockey competition. It was greatly anticipated that the women's gold medal match would feature Canada versus the United States. Canada was favored to come out on top as they had won all the competitions in previous years in women's hockey, with the United States perpetually finishing second, while no other national teams could match their level of play. However, the United States beat Canada in the final and became the first country to win gold in women's ice hockey at the Olympics.

Canada and the USA have dominated the tournament, placing first and second in every tournament until 2019. Canada won gold the first eight straight and the USA dominated recently winning 9 of the last 11 gold medals.

Canada womens national ice hockey team womens national ice hockey team representing Canada

The Canadian women's national ice hockey team is the ice hockey team representing Canada in women's hockey. The team is overseen by Hockey Canada, a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation and participates in international competitions. Canada has been a dominant figure in international competition, having won the majority of major ice hockey tournaments. Canada is rivaled by the United States, the only other winner of a major tournament.

United States womens national ice hockey team womens national ice hockey team representing the USA

The United States women's national ice hockey team is controlled by USA Hockey. The U.S. has been one of the most successful women's ice hockey teams in international play, having won gold or silver in every major tournament with the exception of the 2006 Winter Olympics, where they captured bronze. As of 2018, the U.S. has 75,832 female players.

Structure and Qualification

The women's tournament began as an eight-team tournament featuring Canada, the US, the top five from the 1989 European championships, and one Asian qualifier. The same formula was used for 1992, 1994 and 1997, but changed following the first Olympic Women's Ice Hockey Tournament at the 1998 Nagano Olympics. The best five from the Olympic tournament were qualified for 1999, followed by the best three from qualification rounds during the Olympic year. The championship became a yearly tournament beginning in 1999 with promotion and relegation with lower ranked nations. Remaining nations play in groups of (now) six nations, with as many as five tiers.

The 1989 IIHF European Women Championships was held April 4–9, 1989, in West Germany, the first European Championship to be held. Finland won their first title with a 7–1 victory over neighbours Sweden in the Final. The hosts West Germany picked up the bronze after edging past Norway on penalty shots.

1998 Winter Olympics 18th edition of Winter Olympics, held in Nagano (Japan) in 1998

The 1998 Winter Olympics, officially the XVIII Olympic Winter Games, and commonly known as Nagano 1998, was a winter multi-sport event celebrated from 7 to 22 February 1998 that were centered in Nagano, Japan. The Games also took place in the nearby mountain communities of Hakuba, Karuizawa, Nozawa Onsen, and Yamanouuchi. The city of Nagano had previously been a candidate to host the 1940 Winter Olympics, as well as the 1972 Winter Olympics, but each time Nagano was eliminated at the national level by Sapporo.

The 1999 IIHF World Women's Championships was held between March 8-March 14, 1999, in the city of Espoo in Finland. Team Canada won their 5th consecutive gold medal at the World Championships defeating the United States in a repeat of the previous four finals. Canada skated to a solid 3-1 victory in the final to take the gold with a solid performance that saw them winning all five games.

After the 2017 tournament, it was announced that tournament would expand to 10 teams for 2019, having been played with 8 teams since the first tournament in 1990, except in 2004, 2007, 2008, and 2009, where 9 teams played. The 2004 edition featured 9 teams when Japan was promoted from Division II but no team was relegated from the Top Division in 2003, due to the cancellation of the top division tournament in China because of the outbreak of the SARS disease. [3] Two teams were relegated from the Top Division in 2004, going back to 8 teams for 2005, but due to the success of the 9-team pool in 2004, IIHF decided to expand again to 9 teams for 2007. [4] Reverting to 8 teams after the 2009 tournament. [5]

2019 IIHF Womens World Championship 2019 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2019 IIHF Women's World Championship was an international Ice hockey tournament run by the International Ice Hockey Federation. It was contested in Espoo, Finland from 4 to 14 April 2019.

1990 IIHF Womens World Championship 1990 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 1990 IIHF World Women's Championships were held March 19 to 25, 1990, at the Civic Centre in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The Canadian team won the gold medal, the United States won silver, and Finland won bronze. This was the first IIHF-sanctioned international tournament in women's ice hockey. Fran Rider helped to organize the championships with no financial support from the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association.

2004 IIHF Womens World Championship 2004 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2004 IIHF World Women's Championships were held March 30 – April 6, 2004 in Halifax and Dartmouth, Canada. The Canadian national women's hockey team won their eighth straight World Championships. The event had 9 teams, because the 2003 event was cancelled due to the SARS epidemic, therefore the winners of the 2002 and 2003 Division I tournaments qualified. Canada won their 37th consecutive World Championship game before losing three to one in their third game. They later avenged their loss to the USA by defeating them in the Gold Medal game two to zero. Sweden and Finland also met each other twice, with Finland winning the Bronze Medal game three to two improving on the earlier draw.

Championship Format

Initially, the tournament was an eight-team tournament divided into two groups, which played round-robin. The top two from each group played off for the gold, and beginning in 1999 the bottom two played off to determine placement and relegation. In 2004, 2007, 2008, and 2009 the tournament was played with nine nations, using three groups of three playing round-robin. In this format first place from each group continued on to play for gold, second place from each group played for placement and an opportunity to still play for bronze, and the third place teams played off to determine relegation. Beginning in 2011, the tournament changed the format to encourage more equal games. The top four seed nations played in Group A, where the top two teams got a bye to the semi-finals, the bottom two go to the quarter-finals to face the top two finishers from Group B. The bottom two from Group B then play each other in a best of three to determine relegation. Beginning in 2019 the tournament was expanded to ten teams, bringing with it a new format. The ten teams are divided into two groups of five and play round-robin. In this format, the five teams in Group A and the top three teams from Group B move into the Quarterfinals, seeded A1vsB3, A2vsB2, A3vsB1, and A4vsA5. The bottom two from Group B now play only one 9th place game and both get relegated.

A round-robin tournament is a competition in which each contestant meets all other contestants in turn. A round-robin contrasts with an elimination tournament, in which participants are eliminated after a certain number of losses.

2007 IIHF Womens World Championship 2007 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2007 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships were held between April 3, 2007 and April 10, 2007 in Winnipeg and Selkirk, Manitoba, Canada. There were no championships in 2006 due to the Torino Olympic tournament. Games were played at the MTS Centre and Selkirk Recreation Complex.

2008 IIHF Womens World Championship 2008 edition of the IIHF Womens World Championship

The 2008 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships were held from April 4 to April 13, 2008, in Harbin, People's Republic of China. It was the 11th event, and was run by the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF).

Lower Divisions

By 2003 the lower tiers were formalized into tiered groups of six, called Division I, Division II, and Division III with promotion for the top team in each and relegation for the bottom team. By 2009 it had grown up to Division V, but in 2012 the titles were changed to match the men's tournaments; Division I became IA, Division II became IB, Division III became IIA, Division IV became IIB, and Division V became IIB Qualification. Promotion and relegation remained the same after the title changes.

Rules and eligibility

The rules of play are essentially the same as the men's with one key difference: body checking. Checking was allowed in the first championship but has been assessed as a minor penalty since. To be eligible players must be under the jurisdiction of the governing body they are representing and must be a citizen of that country. Additionally, the player must be eighteen years old, or sixteen with a medical waiver, in the season the tournament takes place. [6]

Tournaments

YearHost cityFinalThird place match
ChampionScoreSecond placeThird placeScoreFourth place
1990 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Ottawa Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
5–2Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
6–3Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1992 Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, Tampere Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
8–0Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
5–4Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1994 Flag of the United States.svg  USA, Lake Placid Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
6–3Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
8–1Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
1997 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Kitchener Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
4–3
(OT)
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
3–0Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg
China
1998Competition not held during 1998 Olympics
1999 Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, Espoo/Vantaa Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–1Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
8–2Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2000 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Mississauga Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–2
(OT)
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
7–1Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2001 Flag of the United States.svg  USA, Minneapolis Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
3–2Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2–1Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2002Competition not held during 2002 Olympics
2003 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China, Beijing Competition at top level was cancelled due to SARS outbreak in China
2004 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Halifax/Dartmouth Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
2–0Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
3–2Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2005 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden, Linköping/Norrköping Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0
(SO)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
5–2Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2006Competition not held during 2006 Olympics
2007 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Winnipeg/Selkirk Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
5–1Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
1–0Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2008 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China, Harbin Flag of the United States.svg
United States
4–3Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
4–1Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
2009 Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, Hämeenlinna Flag of the United States.svg
United States
4–1Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
4–1Flag of Sweden.svg
Sweden
2010Competition not held during 2010 Olympics
2011 Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland, Zürich/Winterthur Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–2
(OT)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
3–2
(OT)
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2012 Flag of the United States.svg  USA, Burlington Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
5–4
(OT)
Flag of the United States.svg
United States
Flag of Switzerland.svg
Switzerland
6–2Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2013 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Ottawa Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–2Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2–0Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2014 Competition not held at top level during 2014 Olympics
2015 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden, Malmö Flag of the United States.svg
United States
7–5Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
4–1Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2016 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Kamloops Flag of the United States.svg
United States
1–0
(OT)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
1–0
(SO)
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
2017 Flag of the United States.svg  USA, Plymouth Flag of the United States.svg
United States
3–2
(OT)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
8–0Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
2018 Competition not held at top level during 2018 Olympics
2019 Flag of Finland.svg  Finland, Espoo Flag of the United States.svg
United States
2–1
(SO)
Flag of Finland.svg
Finland
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg
Canada
7–0Flag of Russia.svg
Russia
2020Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada, Halifax/Truro [7]

Participation and medals

NationTournamentsFirstLastGoldSilverBronzeTotalBest finish (first/last)
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 19 1990 2019 1081191st (1990/2012)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 19 1990 2019 9100191st (2005/2019)
Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 19 1990 2019 0112132nd (2019)
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia 16 1997 2019 00333rd (2001/2016)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 19 1990 2019 00223rd (2005/2007)
Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 16 1990 2019 00113rd (2012)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 11 1992 2009 00004th (1994/1997)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 14 1990 2019 00004th (2017)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 4 1990 1997 00006th (1990/1994)
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 4 2001 2011 00006th (2009)
Flag of the Czech Republic.svg  Czech Republic 5 2013 2019 00006th (2016)
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 7 1990 2019 00007th (2008/2015)
Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 2 2011 2012 00007th (2011)
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1 1992 1992 00007th (1992)
Flag of France.svg  France 1 2019 2019 000010th (2019)

Awards

At most IIHF events, the tournament directorate awards the Best Forward, Best Defenceman, Best Goalkeeper and Most Valuable Player of each tournament. at the women's event, these awards have been handed out in some combination since the first tournament, with the exception of 1997, and the cancelled tournament in 2003.

See also

External links/sources

  1. "IIHF World Women's Championships". International Ice Hockey Federation . Retrieved 12 January 2011.
  2. Merk, Martin (17 December 2010). "New era of women's hockey". International Ice Hockey Federation. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 12 January 2011.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. Merk, Martin. "Women's Worlds grow". International Ice Hockey Federation . Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  4. "The IIHF Annual Congress made the following decisions in Riga during its session on May 19:" (PDF) (Volume 10 Number 4). International Ice Hockey Federation. June 2006. p. 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 February 2014. Retrieved 17 February 2019.
  5. "World Women's back to eight teams". iihf.com. International Ice Hockey Federation. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 17 February 2019.Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |website= (help)
  6. IIHF Statutes and Bylaws, sections 406, 616, and 900
  7. "Halifax, Truro to host 2020 Women's Worlds – The Sports Network". TSN. 30 October 2018. Retrieved 30 October 2018.

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