IUPAC books

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The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry publishes many books which contain its complete list of definitions. The definitions are divided into seven "colour books": Gold, Green, Blue, Purple, Orange, White, and Red. [1] There is also an eighth book—the "Silver Book".

Contents

The eight colour books

Blue Book

Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). A full edition was published in 1979, [2] an abridged and updated version of which was published in 1993 as A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds. [3] Both of these are now out-of-print in their paper versions, but are available free of charge in electronic versions. After the release of a draft version for public comment in 2004 [4] and the publication of several revised sections in the journal Pure and Applied Chemistry , a fully revised version was published in print in 2013. [5] [2]

Gold Book

The front cover of the second edition of the Compendium of Chemical Terminology. GoldBookCover.jpg
The front cover of the second edition of the Compendium of Chemical Terminology.

The Compendium of Chemical Terminology is a book published by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) containing internationally accepted definitions for terms in chemistry. Work on the first edition was initiated by Victor Gold, thus spawning its informal name: the Gold Book.

The first edition was published in 1987 ( ISBN   0-63201-765-1) and the second edition ( ISBN   0-86542-684-8), edited by A. D. McNaught and A. Wilkinson, was published in 1997. A slightly expanded version of the Gold Book is also freely searchable online. Translations have also been published in French, Spanish and Polish.

Green Book

Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry, commonly known as the Green Book, is a compilation of terms and symbols widely used in the field of physical chemistry. It also includes a table of physical constants, tables listing the properties of elementary particles, chemical elements, and nuclides, and information about conversion factors that are commonly used in physical chemistry. The most recent edition is the third edition ( ISBN   978-0-85404-433-7), originally published by IUPAC in 2007. A second printing of the third edition was released in 2008; this printing made several minor revisions to the 2007 text. A third printing of the third edition was released in 2011. The text of the third printing is identical to that of the second printing.

Orange Book

The Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature is a book published by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) containing internationally accepted definitions for terms in analytical chemistry. It has traditionally been published in an orange cover, hence its informal name, the Orange Book.

Although the book is described as the "Definitive Rules", there have been three editions published; the first in 1978 ( ISBN   0-08022-008-8), the second in 1987 ( ISBN   0-63201-907-7) and the third in 1998 ( ISBN   0-86542-615-5). The third edition is also available online. A Catalan translation has also been published (1987, ISBN   84-7283-121-3).

Purple Book

The first edition of the Compendium of Macromolecular Terminology and Nomenclature, known as the Purple Book, was published in 1991. It is about the nomenclature of polymers. The second and latest edition was published in December 2008 [6] and is also available for download. [7]

Red Book

Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry, by chemists commonly referred to as the Red Book, is a collection of recommendations on inorganic chemical nomenclature. It is published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The last full edition was published in 2005, [8] in both paper and electronic versions.

Published editions
Release yearTitlePublisherISBN
2005Recommendations 2005 (Red Book)RSC Publishing0-85404-438-8
2001Recommendations 2000 (Red Book II)
(supplement)
RSC Publishing0-85404-487-6
1990Recommendations 1990 (Red Book I)Blackwell0-632-02494-1
1971Definitive Rules 1970   [9] Butterworth0-408-70168-4
19591957 RulesButterworth
1940/19411940 RulesScientific journals

Silver Book

The IUPAC also publishes a Silver Book, not listed with the other "colour books", titled Compendium of Terminology and Nomenclature of Properties in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. [10] De Gruyter | 2017

White Book

The Biochemical Nomenclature and Related Documents (1992) or White Book contains definitions pertaining to biochemical research compiled jointly by IUPAC and the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry</span> International organization representing chemists

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry is an international federation of National Adhering Organizations working for the advancement of the chemical sciences, especially by developing nomenclature and terminology. It is a member of the International Science Council (ISC). IUPAC is registered in Zürich, Switzerland, and the administrative office, known as the "IUPAC Secretariat", is in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, United States. This administrative office is headed by IUPAC's executive director, currently Lynn Soby.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peroxymonosulfuric acid</span> Powerful oxidizing agent

Peroxymonosulfuric acid, H
2
SO
5
, also known as persulfuric acid, peroxysulfuric acid, or Caro's acid. In this acid, the S(VI) center adopts its characteristic tetrahedral geometry; the connectivity is indicated by the formula HO–O–S(O)2–OH. It is one of the strongest oxidants known (E0 = +2.51 V) and is highly explosive.

The term coordination geometry is used in a number of related fields of chemistry and solid state chemistry/physics.

A chemical nomenclature is a set of rules to generate systematic names for chemical compounds. The nomenclature used most frequently worldwide is the one created and developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

In chemical nomenclature, the IUPAC nomenclature of inorganic chemistry is a systematic method of naming inorganic chemical compounds, as recommended by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). It is published in Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry. Ideally, every inorganic compound should have a name from which an unambiguous formula can be determined. There is also an IUPAC nomenclature of organic chemistry.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bridging ligand</span> Ligand which connects two or more (usually metal) atoms in a coordination complex

In coordination chemistry, a bridging ligand is a ligand that connects two or more atoms, usually metal ions. The ligand may be atomic or polyatomic. Virtually all complex organic compounds can serve as bridging ligands, so the term is usually restricted to small ligands such as pseudohalides or to ligands that are specifically designed to link two metals.

<i>Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry</i>

Quantities, Units and Symbols in Physical Chemistry, also known as the Green Book, is a compilation of terms and symbols widely used in the field of physical chemistry. It also includes a table of physical constants, tables listing the properties of elementary particles, chemical elements, and nuclides, and information about conversion factors that are commonly used in physical chemistry. The Green Book is published by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and is based on published, citeable sources. Information in the Green Book is synthesized from recommendations made by IUPAC, the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), including recommendations listed in the IUPAP Red Book Symbols, Units, Nomenclature and Fundamental Constants in Physics and in the ISO 31 standards.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peroxomonosulfate</span>

The peroxomonosulfate ion, SO2−
5
, is a sulfur oxoanion. It is sometimes referred to as the persulfate ion, but this term also refers to the peroxydisulfate ion, S
2
O2−
8
.

In chemical nomenclature, a preferred IUPAC name (PIN) is a unique name, assigned to a chemical substance and preferred among the possible names generated by IUPAC nomenclature. The "preferred IUPAC nomenclature" provides a set of rules for choosing between multiple possibilities in situations where it is important to decide on a unique name. It is intended for use in legal and regulatory situations.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Propadiene</span> Organic compound (H2C=C=CH2)

Propadiene or allene is the organic compound with the formula H2C=C=CH2. It is the simplest allene, i.e. a compound with two adjacent carbon double bonds. As a constituent of MAPP gas, it has been used as a fuel for specialized welding.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Interpenetrating polymer network</span>

An Interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) is a polymer comprising two or more networks which are at least partially interlaced on a polymer scale but not covalently bonded to each other. The network cannot be separated unless chemical bonds are broken. The two or more networks can be envisioned to be entangled in such a way that they are concatenated and cannot be pulled apart, but not bonded to each other by any chemical bond.

<i>Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry</i> Book describing the nomenclature of organic compounds

Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry, commonly referred to by chemists as the Blue Book, is a collection of recommendations on organic chemical nomenclature published at irregular intervals by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). A full edition was published in 1979, an abridged and updated version of which was published in 1993 as A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds. Both of these are now out-of-print in their paper versions, but are available free of charge in electronic versions. After the release of a draft version for public comment in 2004 and the publication of several revised sections in the journal Pure and Applied Chemistry, a fully revised version was published in print in 2013.

<i>Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature</i>

The Compendium of Analytical Nomenclature is an IUPAC nomenclature book published by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) containing internationally accepted definitions for terms in analytical chemistry. It has traditionally been published in an orange cover, hence its informal name, the Orange Book.

In chemistry, a ring is an ambiguous term referring either to a simple cycle of atoms and bonds in a molecule or to a connected set of atoms and bonds in which every atom and bond is a member of a cycle. A ring system that is a simple cycle is called a monocycle or simple ring, and one that is not a simple cycle is called a polycycle or polycyclic ring system. A simple ring contains the same number of sigma bonds as atoms, and a polycyclic ring system contains more sigma bonds than atoms.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Disulfurous acid</span> Chemical compound

Disulfurous acid or pyrosulfurous acid is an oxoacid of sulfur with the formula H2S2O5. The salts of disulfurous acid are called disulfites or metabisulfites. Disulfurous acid is, like sulfurous acid (H2SO3), a phantom acid, which does not exist in the free state. In contrast to disulfate (S
2
O
7
), disulfite has two directly connected sulfur atoms. The oxidation state of the sulfur atom bonded to three oxygen atoms is +5 while that of the other is +3.

IUPAC Polymer Nomenclature are standardized naming conventions for polymers set by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and described in their publication "Compendium of Polymer Terminology and Nomenclature", which is also known as the "Purple Book". Both the IUPAC and Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) make similar naming recommendations for the naming of polymers.

The Compendium of Macromolecular Nomenclature, by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), provides definition of polymer related terms and rules of nomenclature of polymers. It is referred to as the Purple Book. It was published in 1991 (ISBN 0-63202-8475) by Blackwell Science. The author of this book is W.V. Metanomski.

The Inorganic Chemistry Division of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), also known as Division II, deals with all aspects of inorganic chemistry, including materials and bioinorganic chemistry, and also with isotopes, atomic weights and the periodic table. It furthermore advises the Chemical Nomenclature and Structure Representation Division on issues dealing with inorganic compounds and materials. For the general public, the most visible result of the division's work is that it evaluates and advises the IUPAC on names and symbols proposed for new elements that have been approved for addition to the periodic table. For the scientific end educational community the work on isotopic abundances and atomic weights is of fundamental importance as these numbers are continuously checked and updated.

The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) has published four sets of rules to standardize chemical nomenclature.

A descriptor is in chemical nomenclature a prefix placed before the systematic substance name, which describes the configuration or the stereochemistry of the molecule. Some listed descriptors are only of historical interest and should not be used in publications anymore as they do not correspond with the modern recommendations of the IUPAC. Stereodescriptors are often used in combination with locants to clearly identify a chemical structure unambiguously.

References

  1. "Nomenclature and Terminology (including IUPAC color books)". Archived from the original on 2015-05-20. Retrieved 2014-10-14.
  2. 1 2 Rigaudy, J.; Klesney, S. P., eds. (1979). Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry . IUPAC/Pergamon Press. ISBN   0-08022-3699.
  3. Panico R, Powell WH, Richer JC, eds. (1993). A Guide to IUPAC Nomenclature of Organic Compounds . IUPAC/Blackwell Science. ISBN   0-632-03488-2.
  4. Preferred names in the nomenclature of organic compounds, International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, archived from the original on 2009-12-19, retrieved 2009-11-22.
  5. IUPAC Chemical Nomenclature and Structure Representation Division (2013). Favre, Henri A.; Powell, Warren H. (eds.). Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013. IUPACRSC. ISBN   978-0-85404-182-4.
  6. IUPAC (2009). Jones, Richard G.; Wilks, Edward; et al. (eds.). Compendium of polymer terminology and nomenclature : IUPAC recommendations, 2008 (2nd ed.). Cambridge, UK: RSC Publishing. doi:10.1039/9781847559425. ISBN   978-0-85404-491-7 . Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  7. IUPAC (June 2014). Jones, Richard G.; Wilks, Edward; et al. (eds.). Compendium of Polymer Terminology and Nomenclature – IUPAC Recommendations 2008 (PDF) (online ed.). Cambridge, UK: RSC Publishing. ISBN   978-0-85404-491-7 . Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  8. International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (2005). Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry (IUPAC Recommendations 2005). Cambridge (UK): RSC IUPAC . ISBN   0-85404-438-8 . Electronic version.
  9. Nomenclature of inorganic chemistry; issued by the Commission on the Nomenclature of Inorganic Chemistry [of the] International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Butterworths. 1971. ISBN   9780408701686.
  10. "Silver Book". Archived from the original on 2014-10-14.

11. Website publication of Silver Book: The Silver Book and the NPU Format for Clinical Laboratory Science Reports Regarding Properties, Units, and Symbols . Published Online: 2017-04-25; Published in Print: 2017-04-25

Gold Book

Green Book

Red Book

Blue Book

Purple Book

Orange Book

Silver Book

White Book