Ian Fleming (actor)

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Ian Fleming
Actor Ian Fleming.png
in the trailer for Silver Blaze (1937)
Born
Ian Macfarlane

(1888-09-10)10 September 1888
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Died1 January 1969(1969-01-01) (aged 80)
London, England
Years active1926–1968

Ian Fleming (born Ian Macfarlane; 10 September 1888 1 January 1969) was an Australian character actor with credits in over 100 British films. [1] One on his best known roles was playing Dr Watson in a series of Sherlock Holmes films of the 1930s opposite Arthur Wontner's Holmes. [2]

Contents

He also played a number of supporting roles in many classic British films of the era including Q Planes (1939), Night Train to Munich (1940), We Dive at Dawn , The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (both 1943) and Waterloo Road (1945). [1] He also appeared regularly in the films of musical comedian George Formby. [3] [4] [5] He also acted on stage, appearing as Robert Harley in the Norman Ginsbury's historical work Viceroy Sarah in the West End.

Fleming's later career included appearances in many television series of the 1950s and 1960s, such as Fabian of the Yard , Hancock's Half Hour , Educated Evans , Dixon of Dock Green , Dr. Finlay's Casebook , The Forsyte Saga and The Prisoner . [6]

Partial filmography

Selected stage appearances

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References

  1. 1 2 "Ian Fleming". BFI. Archived from the original on 21 July 2012.
  2. Hal Erickson. "Ian Fleming - Biography, Movie Highlights and Photos - AllMovie". AllMovie.
  3. Gifford, Denis (1 April 2016). British Film Catalogue: Two Volume Set - The Fiction Film/The Non-Fiction Film. Routledge. ISBN   9781317740636 via Google Books.
  4. "Bell-bottom George (1944)".
  5. "Let George Do It! (1940)".
  6. "Ian Fleming". TV.com. CBS Interactive.