Ian Maxtone-Graham

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Ian Maxtone-Graham
BornIan Howes Maxtone-Graham
(1959-07-03) July 3, 1959 (age 60)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Occupation Television writer/producer
Nationality American
Period1983–present

Ian Howes Maxtone-Graham (born July 3, 1959) is an American television writer and producer. He has formerly written for Saturday Night Live (1992–1995) and The Simpsons (1995–2012), as well as serving as a co-executive producer and consulting producer for the latter.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe, which is 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Most of the country is located contiguously in North America between Canada and Mexico.

A television producer is a person who oversees one or more aspects of video production on a television program. Some producers take more of an executive role, in that they conceive new programs and pitch them to the television networks, but upon acceptance they focus on business matters, such as budgets and contracts. Other producers are more involved with the day-to-day workings, participating in activities such as screenwriting, set design, casting and directing.

<i>Saturday Night Live</i> American late-night live television sketch comedy show

Saturday Night Live is an American late-night live television variety show created by Lorne Michaels and developed by Dick Ebersol. The show premiered on NBC on October 11, 1975, under the original title NBC's Saturday Night. The show's comedy sketches, which often parody contemporary culture and politics, are performed by a large and varying cast of repertory and newer cast members. Each episode is hosted by a celebrity guest, who usually delivers the opening monologue and performs in sketches with the cast as with featured performances by a musical guest. An episode normally begins with a cold open sketch that ends with someone breaking character and proclaiming, "Live from New York, it's Saturday Night!", properly beginning the show.

Contents

Early years

Maxtone-Graham was born in New York City, the son of maritime historian John Maxtone-Graham. He is the great-nephew of Jan Struther, the writer of Mrs. Miniver. He attended Trinity School and Brown University. An enthusiastic swimmer, his first job after college was as a diver with an underwater research team. After struggling to establish a career in journalism, he penned material for the television show Not Necessarily the News and the magazines National Lampoon and Army Man . His work in Army Man, an offbeat magazine published by future Simpsons colleague George Meyer, brought him to the attention of Jack Handey, who suggested he work for Saturday Night Live. [1]

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2018 population of 8,398,748 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 19,979,477 people in its 2018 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 22,679,948 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

John Kurtz Maxtone-Graham was a Scottish-American speaker and writer on ocean liners and maritime history.

Jan Struther was the pen name of Joyce Anstruther, later Joyce Maxtone Graham and finally Joyce Placzek, an English writer remembered for her character Mrs. Miniver and a number of hymns, such as "Lord of All Hopefulness".

Saturday Night Live

While working for Saturday Night Live, Maxtone-Graham co-wrote "The Chanukah Song" with Adam Sandler [2] and, according to the DVD commentary for the SNL clip show "The Best of Alec Baldwin," also wrote the infamous "Canteen Boy" sketch in which Canteen Boy is sexually molested by his scoutmaster, Mr. Armstrong (played by episode host Alec Baldwin). According to the memoir of Jay Mohr, Ian Maxtone-Graham threatened to quit and sue the show during the 1993-94 season after an altercation with Norm Macdonald: the lawsuit never came to fruition. [ citation needed ]

"The Chanukah Song" is a novelty song written by comedian Adam Sandler with Saturday Night Live writers Lewis Morton and Ian Maxtone-Graham and originally performed by Sandler on Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update on December 3, 1994. Sandler subsequently performed the song as part of his stand-up act, later updating it with new lyrics. All variations center on the theme of Jewish children feeling alienated during the Christmas season, and Sandler's listing of Jewish celebrities as a way of sympathizing with their situation.

Adam Sandler American actor, comedian, screenwriter, and producer

Adam Richard Sandler is an American actor, comedian, screenwriter, film producer, and musician. After becoming a Saturday Night Live cast member, Sandler went on to star in many Hollywood feature films that combined have grossed over $2 billion at the box office.

Alec Baldwin American actor, writer, producer, and comedian

Alexander Rae "Alec" Baldwin III is an American actor, writer, producer, comedian, and liberal political activist. A member of the Baldwin family, he is the eldest of the four Baldwin brothers, all actors. Baldwin first gained recognition appearing on seasons 6 and 7 of the CBS television drama Knots Landing, in the role of Joshua Rush. He has played both leading and supporting roles in films such as the horror comedy fantasy film Beetlejuice (1988), as Jack Ryan in the action thriller The Hunt for Red October (1990), the romantic comedy The Marrying Man (1991), the drama Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), the superhero film The Shadow (1994) and two films directed by Martin Scorsese: the Howard Hughes biopic The Aviator (2004), and the neo-noir crime drama The Departed (2006). His performance in the 2003 romantic drama The Cooler garnered him a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He has done voice work for The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie (2004), Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (2008) and The Boss Baby (2017).

During all-night Saturday Night Live writing sessions, Sarah Silverman often stole underwear and socks from a cache of fresh clothes Maxtone-Graham kept in his office, and wore them in lieu of her own clothes. [3]

Sarah Silverman American stand-up comedian, actress, producer, and writer

Sarah Kate Silverman is an American stand-up comedian, actress, singer, producer, and writer. Her comedy addresses social taboos and controversial topics, such as racism, sexism, politics, and religion, sometimes having her comic character endorse them in a satirical or deadpan fashion. For her work on television, she has won two Primetime Emmy Awards.

The Simpsons

Maxtone-Graham has become somewhat infamous among The Simpsons fans for a 1998 interview with The Independent , in which he admitted that he had "barely" seen The Simpsons before being hired, and ridiculed "the beetle-browed people on the internet" for their criticism of the show. [4] [5] Although he upset many fans with his comments, Maxtone-Graham has won six Emmys for his work on The Simpsons, [6] and received an Annie Award for writing "The Seemingly Neverending Story". [7]

<i>The Independent</i> British online daily newspaper

The Independent is a British online newspaper. Established in 1986 as a politically independent national morning newspaper published in London. It was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch Alexander Lebedev in 2010. The last printed edition of The Independent was published on Saturday 26 March 2016, leaving only its digital editions.

Annie Award Film award

The Annie Awards are accolades presented annually by the Los Angeles branch of the International Animated Film Association, ASIFA-Hollywood since 1972, to recognize excellence in animation in film and television. Originally designed to celebrate lifetime or career contributions to animation, since 1992 it has given awards to individual films.

One of the episodes written by Maxtone-Graham is "E-I-E-I-(Annoyed Grunt)", in which Homer grows a tomato-tobacco hybrid called "tomacco". The episode was widely acclaimed from viewers and critics alike [8] . Notably, it inspired an Oregon man to make his own version of tomacco by grafting a tomato stem with a tobacco root. He eventually gave some to Maxtone-Graham, who ate it. [9]

"E-I-E-I-(Annoyed Grunt)", also known as "E-I-E-I-D'oh", is the fifth episode of the eleventh season of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on November 7, 1999. In the episode, inspired by a Zorro movie, Homer begins slapping people with a glove and challenging them to duels. However, when a real Southern gentleman accepts Homer's request for a duel, the Simpsons run off to the old farm Homer lived in with his parents and breed a dangerously addictive but successful tobacco/tomato hybrid called "tomacco". The episode was written by Ian Maxtone-Graham and directed by Bob Anderson. The episode received mixed reviews.

Homer Simpson fictional character from The Simpsons franchise

Homer Jay Simpson is a fictional character and the main protagonist of the American animated sitcom The Simpsons. He is voiced by Dan Castellaneta and first appeared on television, along with the rest of his family, in The Tracey Ullman Show short "Good Night" on April 19, 1987. Homer was created and designed by cartoonist Matt Groening while he was waiting in the lobby of James L. Brooks' office. Groening had been called to pitch a series of shorts based on his comic strip Life in Hell but instead decided to create a new set of characters. He named the character after his father, Homer Groening. After appearing for three seasons on The Tracey Ullman Show, the Simpson family got their own series on Fox that debuted December 17, 1989.

At 6'8" (2.03m), Maxtone-Graham inspired a character on The Simpsons: "Very Tall Man", who first appeared in "22 Short Films About Springfield". [4]

Writing credits

Maxtone-Graham has been credited as writing the following episodes of The Simpsons:

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References

  1. Catherine Seip. "A Decade of D'oh!". Mediaweek, December 20, 1999.
  2. Mark Shanahan and Meredith Goldstein. "An animated conversation". The Boston Globe. July 22, 2009. Retrieved on January 28, 2010.
  3. Silverman, Sarah. The Bedwetter: Stories of Courage, Redemption and Pee. HarperCollins, 2010. p. 103-104
  4. 1 2 O'Sullivan, Charlotte (1998-06-22). "Behind Every Homer Is a Very Tall Man". The Independent . Retrieved 2011-09-21.
  5. Turner, Chris (2004). Planet Simpson: How a Cartoon Masterpiece Defined a Generation . Foreword by Douglas Coupland. (1st ed.). Cambridge: Da Capo Press. p. 290. ISBN   978-0-306-81341-2. OCLC   670978714.
  6. Primetime Emmy Award Database. Emmys.com. Retrieved on January 28, 2010.
  7. 34th Annual Annie Award Nominees and Winners Archived 2008-05-09 at the Wayback Machine . The Annie Awards. Retrieved on January 28, 2010.
  8. "The Simpsons Episode 5 Series 11 Cast List And Preview". Radio Times. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  9. Horatia Harrod. "Simpsons stories: the tomacco man". Telegraph. January 5, 2010. Retrieved on January 28, 2010.