Iceland national football team

Last updated

Iceland
Football Association of Iceland logo.svg
Nickname(s) Strákarnir okkar (Our Boys)
Association Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)
Knattspyrnusamband Íslands
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Erik Hamrén
Captain Aron Gunnarsson
Most caps Rúnar Kristinsson (104)
Top scorer Eiður Guðjohnsen
Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (26)
Home stadium Laugardalsvöllur
FIFA code ISL
Kit left arm ijsl18h.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body ijsl18h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm ijsl18h.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts ijsl18h.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks ijsl18h.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm ijsl18a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body ijsl18a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm ijsl18a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts ijsl18a.png
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks ijsl18a.png
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 39 Increase2.svg 1 (28 November 2019) [1]
Highest18 (February–March 2018)
Lowest131 (April–June 2012)
Elo ranking
Current 46 Steady2.svg(25 November 2019) [2]
Highest19 (October 2017)
Lowest128 (August 1973)
First international
Unofficial:
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 0–1 Iceland  Flag of Iceland (1918-1944).svg
(Faroe Islands; 29 July 1930) [3]
Official:
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 0–3 Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 17 July 1946) [4]
Biggest win
Unofficial:
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 9–0 Faroe Islands  Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg
(Keflavík, Iceland; 10 July 1985)
Official:
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 5–0 Malta  Flag of Malta.svg
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 27 July 2000) [5]
Biggest defeat
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 14–2 Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 23 August 1967)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2018 )
Best resultGroup stage (2018)
UEFA European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2016 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2016)
Iceland national football team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Rostov-on-Don, Russia 2018 World Cup Iceland1.jpg
Iceland national football team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Rostov-on-Don, Russia

The Iceland national football team (Icelandic : Íslenska karlalandsliðið í knattspyrnu) represents Iceland in international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland.

Contents

The team has enjoyed success in the second half of the 2010s. In the qualifying rounds for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, Iceland reached the playoffs before losing to Croatia. Iceland reached its first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2016, after a qualification campaign which included home and away wins over the Netherlands. After advancing to the knockout stages of Euro 2016, Iceland defeated England in the Round of 16, advancing to the quarter-finals, where they lost to host nation France 5–2. They became the smallest nation by population to ever clinch a FIFA World Cup berth when they qualified for the 2018 tournament on 9 October 2017. [6] They drew with Argentina in their opening match, but nonetheless still went out in the group stage. [7] [8]

History

20th century

Although Úrvalsdeild, the Icelandic Football League, was founded in 1912, [9] the country's first international match was played on 29 July 1930, against the Faroe Islands. [10] Although Iceland won 1–0 away, both teams were at the time unaffiliated with FIFA. [11] The first match officially recognised by FIFA took place in Reykjavík on 17 July 1946, a 0–3 loss to Denmark. [12] The first international victory was against Finland in 1947. [13] For the first 20 years of the Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)'s existence, mostly the team did not participate in qualifying for the FIFA World Cup or the UEFA European Championship. In 1954, Iceland applied to take part in qualification for the 1954 World Cup, but the application was rejected. [10] In qualification for the 1958 World Cup, Iceland finished last in their group with zero wins, conceding 26 goals. [10]

In 1980, Iceland won the first edition of the friendly tournament known as the Greenland Cup. [14]

Since 1974, the team has taken part in qualifying for every World Cup and European Championship. In 1994, the team reached their then best ever position in the FIFA World Rankings, 37th. This record stood until 2016 when they managed to reach 21st. [15] In a friendly against Estonia on 24 April 1996 in Tallinn, Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen entered as a substitute for his father Arnór. This marked the first time that a father and son played in the same international match. [16]

21st century

In qualification for Euro 2004, Iceland finished third in their group, one point behind Scotland. [17] As a result, they failed to qualify for a playoff spot. [18]

In 2014, Iceland almost secured qualification for their first World Cup. [19] Finishing second in Group D, they played Croatia in a two-leg playoff for qualification. [20] [21] After holding them to a 0–0 draw in the home leg, they lost 2–0 away. [22]

Iceland qualified for a major tournament for the first time in 2015 after finishing second in Group A of qualification for Euro 2016, losing only two games, and beating the Netherlands – which had finished third in the 2014 World Cup – twice. [23] During the qualification, they reached their then highest ranking in the FIFA World Rankings, 23rd. [24] [25] Iceland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Hungary and Austria for the final tournament.

At the tournament finals, Iceland recorded 1–1 draws in their first two group stage matches against Portugal and Hungary. They then advanced from their group with a 2–1 victory against Austria. [26] Iceland qualified for the tournament's quarter-finals after a shock 2–1 win over England in the Round of 16, which led England manager Roy Hodgson to resign immediately after the final whistle. [27] However, they were eliminated by host nation France in the quarter-finals, 5–2. [28]

World Cup team 2018. Iceland national football team World Cup 2018.jpg
World Cup team 2018.

Iceland qualified for the 2018 World Cup, their first ever appearance in the world championship, securing qualification on 9 October 2017 after a 2–0 win against Kosovo. They became the lowest-populated country to reach the final tournament, and this is considered the greatest moment in Icelandic sports history as they qualified for the World Cup for the first time in the country’s history. [29] Iceland were drawn to play Croatia, Argentina and Nigeria in a group that was considered by many as the "group of death". [30] [31] Despite a challenging group, Iceland were tipped to advance from the group by several journalist websites, based on their impressive performance in Euro 2016. [32] Their maiden match at the World Cup was against 2014 runners-up Argentina, with Iceland surprisingly holding Argentina to a 1–1 draw, had proven it [33] [34] (this also made them the least-populous country ever to have scored in a World Cup match). However, their chances of advancing from the group were hurt following a 2–0 loss to Nigeria, putting Iceland to play with full determination against already qualified Croatia. [35] [36] Iceland lost to Croatia in their final group game; and because Argentina won against Nigeria, Iceland finished bottom of the group with just a point. [37] [38]

Competitive record

For the all-time record of the national team against opposing nations, see the team's all-time record page.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Did not enter
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 Entry not accepted by FIFA
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Did not qualify4004626
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 Did not enter
Flag of England.svg 1966
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 Did not qualify6006229
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 6105212
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 82241021
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 6105410
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 8143611
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 832376
Flag of France.svg 1998 102351116
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 104151420
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 101181427
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 8125713
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 125341717
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 Group Stage28th30122510712167
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 TBD
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of the United States.svg Flag of Mexico.svg 2026
TotalGroup Stage1/21301225106281959116215

European Championship record

UEFA European Championship record UEFA European Championship qualifying record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of France.svg 1960 Did not enter
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 Did not qualify201135
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 Did not enter
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 Did not qualify612338
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 8008221
Flag of France.svg 1984 8116313
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 8224414
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 8206710
Flag of England.svg 1996 8125312
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 10433127
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 8413119
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 122281027
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 8116614
Flag of France.svg 2016 Quarter Finals8th52218910622176
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 TBD106131411
TotalQuarter Finals1/1652218910630185895157

Recent fixtures and results

2018

2019

2020

9 June 2020 Friendly Poland  Flag of Poland.svgvFlag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Poznań, Poland

Honours

FIFA ranking history

Source: [39]

199219931994199519961997199819992000200120022003200420052006200720082009201020112012201320142015201620172018
46473950607264435052585893949390839211210490493336212237

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head coach Flag of Sweden.svg Erik Hamrén
Assistant coach Flag of Iceland.svg Freyr Alexandersson
Goalkeeping coach Flag of Sweden.svg Lars Eriksson

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying matches against Turkey and Moldova on 14 November and 17 November 2019.
All caps and goals are correct as of 17 November 2019 after the match against Moldova.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Hannes Þór Halldórsson (1984-04-27) 27 April 1984 (age 35)670 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur
121 GK Ögmundur Kristinsson (1989-06-19) 19 June 1989 (age 30)150 Flag of Greece.svg AEL
131 GK Ingvar Jónsson (1989-10-18) 18 October 1989 (age 30)80 Flag of Denmark.svg Viborg

62 DF Ragnar Sigurðsson (1986-06-19) 19 June 1986 (age 33)945 Flag of Russia.svg Rostov
142 DF Kári Árnason (1982-10-13) 13 October 1982 (age 37)816 Flag of Iceland.svg Víkingur
232 DF Ari Freyr Skúlason (1987-05-14) 14 May 1987 (age 32)720 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Oostende
52 DF Sverrir Ingi Ingason (1993-08-05) 5 August 1993 (age 26)293 Flag of Greece.svg PAOK
182 DF Hörður Björgvin Magnússon (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 (age 26)282 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow
32 DF Jón Guðni Fjóluson (1989-04-10) 10 April 1989 (age 30)161 Flag of Russia.svg Krasnodar
22 DF Hjörtur Hermannsson (1995-02-08) 8 February 1995 (age 24)141 Flag of Denmark.svg Brøndby
162 DF Hólmar Örn Eyjólfsson (1990-08-06) 6 August 1990 (age 29)121 Flag of Bulgaria.svg Levski Sofia

83 MF Birkir Bjarnason (1988-05-27) 27 May 1988 (age 31)8413 Flag of Qatar.svg Al-Arabi
103 MF Gylfi Sigurðsson (1989-09-08) 8 September 1989 (age 30)7422 Flag of England.svg Everton
213 MF Arnór Ingvi Traustason (1993-04-30) 30 April 1993 (age 26)335 Flag of Sweden.svg Malmö
43 MF Victor Pálsson (1991-04-30) 30 April 1991 (age 28)150 Flag of Germany.svg Darmstadt 98
153 MF Arnór Sigurðsson (1999-05-15) 15 May 1999 (age 20)81 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow
73 MF Samúel Friðjónsson (1996-02-22) 22 February 1996 (age 23)80 Flag of Norway.svg Viking
203 MF Aron Elís Þrándarson (1994-11-10) 10 November 1994 (age 25)40 Flag of Norway.svg Aalesund
173 MF Mikael Anderson (1998-07-01) 1 July 1998 (age 21)30 Flag of Denmark.svg Midtjylland

114 FW Alfreð Finnbogason (1989-02-01) 1 February 1989 (age 30)5716 Flag of Germany.svg Augsburg
94 FW Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (1990-03-14) 14 March 1990 (age 29)5626 Flag of Sweden.svg AIK
224 FW Jón Daði Böðvarsson (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 27)483 Flag of England.svg Millwall
194 FW Viðar Örn Kjartansson (1990-03-11) 11 March 1990 (age 29)243 Flag of Russia.svg Rubin Kazan

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up to the Iceland squad in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Rúnar Alex Rúnarsson (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 24)50 Flag of France.svg Dijon v. Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey , 14 November 2019 INJ
GK Frederik Schram (1995-01-19) 19 January 1995 (age 24)50 Flag of Denmark.svg Lyngby v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
GK Anton Ari Einarsson (1994-08-25) 25 August 1994 (age 25)20 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019

DF Birkir Már Sævarsson (1984-11-11) 11 November 1984 (age 35)901 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur v. Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra , 14 October 2019
DF Daníel Leó Grétarsson (1995-10-02) 2 October 1995 (age 24)00 Flag of Norway.svg Aalesund v. Flag of Albania.svg  Albania , 10 September 2019
DF Böðvar Böðvarsson (1995-04-09) 9 April 1995 (age 24)50 Flag of Poland.svg Jagiellonia Białystok v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
DF Axel Óskar Andrésson (1998-01-27) 27 January 1998 (age 21)20 Flag of Norway.svg Viking v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
DF Adam Örn Arnarson (1995-08-27) 27 August 1995 (age 24)10 Flag of Poland.svg Górnik Zabrze v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
DF Davíð Kristján Ólafsson (1995-05-15) 15 May 1995 (age 24)10 Flag of Norway.svg Aalesund v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
DF Eiður Aron Sigurbjörnsson (1990-02-26) 26 February 1990 (age 29)10 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019

MF Rúnar Már Sigurjónsson (1990-06-18) 18 June 1990 (age 29)251 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg Astana v. Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey , 14 November 2019 INJ
MF Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson (1990-10-27) 27 October 1990 (age 29)757 Flag of England.svg Burnley v. Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra , 14 October 2019 INJ
MF Emil Hallfreðsson (1984-06-29) 29 June 1984 (age 35)711 Unattached v. Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra , 14 October 2019
MF Aron Gunnarsson (Captain) (1989-04-22) 22 April 1989 (age 30)872 Flag of Qatar.svg Al-Arabi v. Flag of France.svg  France , 11 October 2019 INJ
MF Rúrik Gíslason (1988-02-25) 25 February 1988 (age 31)533 Flag of Germany.svg Sandhausen v. Flag of Turkey.svg  Turkey , 11 June 2019
MF Arnór Smárason (1988-09-07) 7 September 1988 (age 31)263 Flag of Norway.svg Lillestrøm v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Eggert Jónsson (1988-08-18) 18 August 1988 (age 31)210 Flag of Denmark.svg SønderjyskE v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Guðmundur Þórarinsson (1992-04-26) 26 April 1992 (age 27)50 Flag of Sweden.svg IFK Norrköping v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Hilmar Árni Halldórsson (1992-02-14) 14 February 1992 (age 27)40 Flag of Iceland.svg Stjarnan v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Jón Dagur Þorsteinsson (1998-11-26) 26 November 1998 (age 21)31 Flag of Denmark.svg AGF v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Kolbeinn Finnsson (1999-08-25) 25 August 1999 (age 20)20 Flag of Germany.svg Borussia Dortmund v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Alex Þór Hauksson (1999-11-26) 26 November 1999 (age 20)10 Flag of Iceland.svg Stjarnan v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
MF Willum Þór Willumsson (1998-10-23) 23 October 1998 (age 21)10 Flag of Belarus.svg BATE Borisov v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019

FW Albert Guðmundsson (1997-06-15) 15 June 1997 (age 22)113 Flag of the Netherlands.svg AZ v. Flag of Albania.svg  Albania , 10 September 2019
FW Björn Bergmann Sigurðarson (1991-02-26) 26 February 1991 (age 28)171 Flag of Russia.svg Rostov v. Flag of Andorra.svg  Andorra , 22 March 2019 INJ
FW Óttar Magnús Karlsson (1997-02-21) 21 February 1997 (age 22)72 Flag of Iceland.svg Víkingur v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
FW Andri Rúnar Bjarnason (1990-11-12) 12 November 1990 (age 29)51 Flag of Germany.svg Kaiserslautern v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019
FW Kristján Flóki Finnbogason (1995-01-12) 12 January 1995 (age 24)41 Flag of Iceland.svg KR v. Flag of Estonia.svg  Estonia , 15 January 2019

INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
PRE Preliminary squad.
WTD Player withdrew from the national team.
SUS Player is serving suspension.

Previous squads

Kit providers

The official kit is produced by Italian sports manufacturing company Erreà since 2002. Before that the kit providers were Umbro (1975), Adidas (1976–1992), ABM (1992-1996) and Reusch (1996–2001).

PeriodKit provider
1975 Flag of England.svg Umbro
1976–1991 Flag of Germany.svg Adidas
1992–1996 Flag of Italy.svg ABM
1996–2001 Flag of Germany.svg Reusch
2002–present Flag of Italy.svg Erreà

Records

Most caps

As of 17 November 2019, the 20 players with the most caps for Iceland are:

Note: Some unofficial matches are counted for some players, as per the KSÍ count.

Hermann Hreidarsson played 89 games for Iceland between 1996 and 2011, which puts him fourth in the nation's appearances list. Hermann Hreidarsson o crop.png
Hermann Hreiðarsson played 89 games for Iceland between 1996 and 2011, which puts him fourth in the nation's appearances list.
RankNameCareerCapsGoals
1 Rúnar Kristinsson 1987–20041043
2 Ragnar Sigurðsson 2007–945
3 Birkir Már Sævarsson 2007–901
4 Hermann Hreiðarsson 1996–2011895
5 Eiður Guðjohnsen 1996–20168826
6 Aron Einar Gunnarsson 2008–872
7 Birkir Bjarnason 2010–8414
8 Kári Árnason 2005–816
9 Guðni Bergsson 1984–2003801
10 Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson 2008–758
11 Brynjar Björn Gunnarsson 1997–2009745
Birkir Kristinsson 1988–2004740
Gylfi Sigurðsson 2010–7422
14 Arnór Guðjohnsen 1979–19977314
15 Ólafur Þórðarson 1984–1996725
Ari Freyr Skúlason 2009–720
17 Arnar Grétarsson 1991–2004712
Árni Gautur Arason 1998–2010710
Emil Hallfreðsson 2005–711
20 Atli Eðvaldsson 1976–1991708

In bold players still playing or available for selection.

Top goalscorers

As of 17 November 2019, the 20 players with the most goals for Iceland are:

Note: Some unofficial matches are counted for some players, as per the KSÍ count.

Eidur Smari Gudjohnsen scored a record 26 goals for Iceland in a 20-year international career. Eidur GudjohnsenMonacoauto.jpg
Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen scored a record 26 goals for Iceland in a 20-year international career.
RankNameCareerGoalsCapsGPG
1 Kolbeinn Sigþórsson 2010–26560.46
Eiður Guðjohnsen (list)1996–201626880.30
3 Gylfi Sigurðsson 2010–22740.30
4 Ríkharður Jónsson 1947–196517330.52
5 Alfreð Finnbogason 2010–16570.28
6 Ríkharður Daðason 1991–200414440.32
Birkir Bjarnason 2010–14840.15
Arnór Guðjohnsen 1979–199714730.19
8 Þórður Guðjónsson 1993–200413580.22
10 Tryggvi Guðmundsson 1997–200812420.29
Heiðar Helguson 1999–201112550.22
12 Pétur Pétursson 1978–199011410.27
Matthías Hallgrímsson 1968–197711450.24
14 Helgi Sigurðsson 1993–200810620.16
Eyjólfur Sverrisson 1990–200110660.15
16 Þórður Þórðarson 1951–19589160.56
Teitur Þórðarson 1972–19859410.22
18 Guðmundur Steinsson 1980–19888190.42
Sigurður Grétarsson 1980–19928460.17
Marteinn Geirsson 1971–19828670.12
Atli Eðvaldsson 1976–19918700.11
Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson 2008–8750.11

In bold players still playing or available for selection.

See also

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