Iceland national football team

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Contents

Iceland
Iceland national football team logo.svg
Nickname(s) Strákarnir okkar (Our Boys)
Association Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)
Knattspyrnusamband Íslands
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Arnar Viðarsson
Captain Aron Gunnarsson
Most caps Rúnar Kristinsson (104)
Top scorer Eiður Guðjohnsen
Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (26)
Home stadium Laugardalsvöllur
FIFA code ISL
Kit left arm pumafinal21rb.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body isl20h.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm pumafinal21rb.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm isl20a.png
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body isl20a.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm isl20a.png
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 52 Steady2.svg (27 May 2021) [1]
Highest18 (February–March 2018)
Lowest131 (April–June 2012)
First international
Unofficial
Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg  Faroe Islands 0–1 Iceland  Flag of Iceland (1918-1944).svg
(Tórshavn, Faroe Islands; 29 July 1930) [2]
Official
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 0–3 Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 17 July 1946) [3]
Biggest win
Unofficial
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 9–0 Faroe Islands  Flag of the Faroe Islands.svg
(Keflavík, Iceland; 10 July 1985)
Official
Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 5–0 Malta  Flag of Malta.svg
(Reykjavík, Iceland; 27 July 2000) [4]
Biggest defeat
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 14–2 Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg
(Copenhagen, Denmark; 23 August 1967)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2018 )
Best resultGroup stage (2018)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2016 )
Best resultQuarter-finals (2016)

The Iceland national football team (Icelandic : Íslenska karlalandsliðið í knattspyrnu) represents Iceland in men's international football. The team is controlled by the Football Association of Iceland, and have been a FIFA member since 1947 and an UEFA member since 1957. The team's nickname is Strákarnir okkar, which means Our Boys in Icelandic.

The team has enjoyed success in the second half of the 2010s. In the qualifying rounds for the 2014 FIFA World Cup, Iceland reached the playoffs before losing to Croatia. Iceland reached its first major tournament, UEFA Euro 2016, after a qualification campaign which included home and away wins over the Netherlands. After advancing to the knockout stages of Euro 2016, Iceland defeated England in the Round of 16, advancing to the quarter-finals, where they lost to host nation France 5–2. They became the smallest nation by population to ever clinch a FIFA World Cup berth when they qualified for the 2018 tournament on 9 October 2017. [5] They drew with Argentina in their opening match, but nonetheless still went out in the group stage. [6] [7]

History

20th century

Although Úrvalsdeild, the Icelandic Football League, was founded in 1912, [8] the country's first international match was played on 29 July 1930, against the Faroe Islands. [9] Although Iceland won 1–0 away, both teams were at the time unaffiliated with FIFA. [10] The first match officially recognised by FIFA took place in Reykjavík on 17 July 1946, a 0–3 loss to Denmark. [11] The first international victory was against Finland in 1947. [12] For the first 20 years of the Football Association of Iceland (KSÍ)'s existence, the team mostly did not participate in qualifying for the FIFA World Cup or the UEFA European Championship. In 1954, Iceland applied to take part in qualification for the 1954 World Cup, but the application was rejected. [9] In qualification for the 1958 World Cup, Iceland finished last in their group with zero wins, conceding 26 goals. [9]

In 1980, Iceland won the first edition of the friendly tournament known as the Greenland Cup. [13]

Since 1974, the team has taken part in qualifying for every World Cup and European Championship. In 1994, the team reached their then best ever position in the FIFA World Rankings, 37th. This record stood until 2016 when they managed to reach 21st. [14] In a friendly against Estonia on 24 April 1996 in Tallinn, Eiður Smári Guðjohnsen entered as a substitute for his father Arnór. This marked the first time that a father and son played in the same international match. [15]

21st century

Iceland national football team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Rostov-on-Don, Russia 2018 World Cup Iceland1.jpg
Iceland national football team at the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Rostov-on-Don, Russia

In qualification for Euro 2004, Iceland finished third in their group, one point behind Scotland. [16] As a result, they failed to qualify for a playoff spot. [17]

In 2014, Iceland almost secured qualification for their first World Cup. [18] Finishing second in Group D, they played Croatia in a two-leg playoff for qualification. [19] [20] After holding them to a 0–0 draw in the home leg, they lost 2–0 away. [21]

Iceland qualified for a major tournament for the first time in 2015 after finishing second in Group A of qualification for Euro 2016, losing only two games, and beating the Netherlands – which had finished third in the 2014 World Cup – twice. [22] During the qualification, they reached their then highest ranking in the FIFA World Rankings, 23rd. [23] [24] Iceland were drawn into a group with Portugal, Hungary and Austria for the final tournament.

At the tournament finals, Iceland recorded 1–1 draws in their first two group stage matches against Portugal and Hungary. They then advanced from their group with a 2–1 victory against Austria. [25] Iceland qualified for the tournament's quarter-finals after a 2–1 upset win over England in the Round of 16, which led to England manager Roy Hodgson resigning in disgrace immediately after the final whistle. [26] However, they were eliminated by host nation France in the quarter-finals, 5–2. [27]

World Cup team 2018. Iceland national football team World Cup 2018.jpg
World Cup team 2018.

Iceland qualified for the 2018 World Cup, their first ever appearance in the world championship, securing qualification on 9 October 2017 after a 2–0 win against Kosovo. In doing so, they became the lowest-populated country ever to reach the finals. [28] Iceland were drawn to play Croatia, Argentina and Nigeria in a group that was considered by many as the "group of death". [29] [30] Despite a challenging group, Iceland were tipped to advance from the group by several journalist websites, based on their impressive performance in Euro 2016. [31] Their maiden match at the World Cup was against 2014 runners-up Argentina, with Iceland surprisingly holding Argentina to a 1–1 draw. [32] [33] However, their chances of advancing from the group were hurt following a 2–0 loss to Nigeria, putting Iceland to play with full determination against already qualified Croatia. [34] [35] Iceland lost to Croatia in their final group game; and because Argentina won against Nigeria, Iceland finished bottom of the group with just a point. [36] [37]

In 2020, Iceland came agonisingly close to qualifying for Euro 2020. In their playoff game against Hungary, Iceland led 1–0 for nearly the entire match until Hungary scored two goals in two minutes, the first coming in the 88th minute to stun Iceland and the second in the second minute of added time, proving to be the winner; Hungary had beaten Iceland 2–1. [38] Iceland had also suffered poor results in their UEFA Nations League campaign in League A, having lost all their group stage matches and failing to garner a single point, resulting in their relegation to League B the following season. [39] Manager Erik Hamrén ultimately resigned, following their poor performance that year. [40]

Team image

The national team uses a blue as the home colours and white as their second colours but their crest featuring stylized imagery of Iceland's four "guardian spirits" (Landvættir) in local folklore; a giant, a dragon, a bull, and an eagle. The team's crest was adopted in 2020 and was designed by Reykjavík-based firm Bradenburg. Previously the team used a team crest which features a shield-type symbol which consist the abbreviation of the Football Association of Iceland in Icelandic (KSI), strips which derives colors from the Flag of Iceland, and a football. [41] [42]

Iceland's supporters became known for using Viking Clap chant in the mid-2010s, which involves fans clapping their hands above their hands and yelling "huh!" to the beat of a drum. Iceland's Viking Clap first received wider international attention during the Euro 2016. [43]

Kit providers

The official kit is produced by German sports manufacturing company Puma since 2020. Before that the kit providers were Umbro (1975), Adidas (1976–1992), ABM (1992-1996), Reusch (1996–2001) and Erreà (2002–2020)

Kit providerPeriod
Flag of England.svg Umbro 1975
Flag of Germany.svg Adidas 1976–1991
Flag of Italy.svg ABM1992–1996
Flag of Italy.svg Reusch 1996–2001
Flag of Italy.svg Erreà 2002–2020
Flag of Germany.svg Puma 2020–

Results and fixtures

  Win  Draw  Loss

2020

5 September 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg0–1Flag of England.svg  England Reykjavík, Iceland
19:45 BST Report
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 0
Referee: Srđan Jovanović (Serbia)
8 September 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 Belgium  Flag of Belgium (civil).svg5–1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Brussels, Belgium
19:45 BST
Report
Stadium: King Baudouin Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Paweł Raczkowski (Poland)
8 October 2020 UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying play-offs Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg2–1Flag of Romania.svg  Romania Reykjavík, Iceland
20:45 (19:45  UTC±0)
Report
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 59
Referee: Damir Skomina (Slovenia)
11 October 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg0–3Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Reykjavík, Iceland
19:45 BST Report
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 59
Referee: Bojan Pandžić (Sweden)
14 October 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svg1–2Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium Reykjavík, Iceland
19:45 BST Birkir Már Soccerball shade.svg 17' Report R. Lukaku Soccerball shade.svg 9', 38' (pen.)Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
Attendance: 59
Referee: Andris Treimanis (Latvia)
12 November 2020 (2020-11-12) UEFA Euro 2020 qualifying play-offs Hungary  Flag of Hungary.svg2–1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Budapest, Hungary
20:45
Report Stadium: Puskás Aréna
Attendance: 0
Referee: Björn Kuipers (Netherlands)
15 November 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg2–1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Copenhagen, Denmark
19:45 BST
Report Stadium: Parken Stadium
Referee: Halil Umut Meler (Turkey)
18 November 2020 UEFA Nations League Group A2 England  Flag of England.svg4–0Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland London, England
17:00 GMT
Report Stadium: Wembley Stadium
Referee: Fábio Veríssimo (Portugal)

2021

[44] [45]

29 May 2021 Friendly Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg2–1Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Arlington, United States
00:30  UTC+2
Report
Stadium: AT&T Stadium
Attendance: 0
Referee: Ted Unkel (United States)
8 June 2021 Friendly Poland  Flag of Poland.svg2–2Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland Poznań, Poland
18:00  UTC+2
Report Stadium: Stadion Miejski
Referee: Balazs Berke (Hungary)
2 September 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svgvFlag of Romania.svg  Romania Reykjavík, Iceland
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur
8 September 2021 2022 World Cup qualification Iceland  Flag of Iceland.svgvFlag of Germany.svg  Germany Reykjavík, Iceland
Stadium: Laugardalsvöllur

Coaching staff

PositionName
Head coach Flag of Iceland.svg Arnar Viðarsson
Assistant coach Flag of Iceland.svg Eiður Guðjohnsen
Technical advisor Flag of Sweden.svg Lars Lagerbäck
Training coach Flag of Iceland.svg Birkir Eyjólfsson
Fitness coach Flag of Iceland.svg Ári Þor Örlygsson
First-Team Doctor Flag of Iceland.svg Jóhannes Rúnarsson
Goalkeeper coach Flag of Iceland.svg Halldór Björnsson
Physiotherapist Flag of Iceland.svg Sverrir Sigþorsson

Players

Current squad

The following players were called up for the friendly matches against Mexico, Faroe Islands, and Poland, played on 29 May, 4 June and 8 June 2021 respectively. [46]
All caps and goals are correct as of 8 June 2021 after the match against Poland.

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
1 GK Ögmundur Kristinsson (1989-06-19) 19 June 1989 (age 32)190 Flag of Greece.svg Olympiacos
1 GK Rúnar Alex Rúnarsson (1995-02-18) 18 February 1995 (age 26)100 Flag of England.svg Arsenal
1 GK Elías Rafn Ólafsson (2000-03-11) 11 March 2000 (age 21)00 Flag of Denmark.svg Fredericia

2 DF Hjörtur Hermannsson (1995-02-08) 8 February 1995 (age 26)221 Flag of Denmark.svg Brøndby
2 DF Guðmundur Þórarinsson (1992-04-15) 15 April 1992 (age 29)70 Flag of the United States.svg New York City
2 DF Alfons Sampsted (1998-04-06) 6 April 1998 (age 23)50 Flag of Norway.svg Bodø/Glimt
2 DF Brynjar Ingi Bjarnason (1999-12-06) 6 December 1999 (age 21)31 Flag of Iceland.svg KA
2 DF Valgeir Lunddal Friðriksson (2001-09-24) 24 September 2001 (age 19)10 Flag of Sweden.svg Häcken
2 DF Ísak Ólafsson (2000-06-30) 30 June 2000 (age 21)10 Flag of Iceland.svg Keflavík
2 DF Kolbeinn Þórðarson (2000-03-12) 12 March 2000 (age 21)10 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Lommel

3 MF Birkir Bjarnason (1988-05-27) 27 May 1988 (age 33)9814 Flag of Italy.svg Brescia
3 MF Aron Gunnarsson (Captain) (1989-04-22) 22 April 1989 (age 32)972 Flag of Qatar.svg Al-Arabi
3 MF Mikael Anderson (1998-07-01) 1 July 1998 (age 23)91 Flag of Denmark.svg Midtjylland
3 MF Jón Dagur Þorsteinsson (1998-11-26) 26 November 1998 (age 22)91 Flag of Denmark.svg AGF
3 MF Aron Elís Þrándarson (1994-11-10) 10 November 1994 (age 26)60 Flag of Denmark.svg OB
3 MF Andri Baldursson (2002-01-10) 10 January 2002 (age 19)40 Flag of Italy.svg Bologna
3 MF Ísak Bergmann Jóhannesson (2003-03-23) 23 March 2003 (age 18)40 Flag of Sweden.svg IFK Norrköping
3 MF Stefán Teitur Þórðarson (1998-10-16) 16 October 1998 (age 22)40 Flag of Denmark.svg Silkeborg
3 MF Gísli Eyjólfsson (1994-05-31) 31 May 1994 (age 27)20 Flag of Iceland.svg Breiðablik
3 MF Þórir Jóhann Helgason (2000-09-28) 28 September 2000 (age 20)10 Flag of Iceland.svg FH

4 FW Kolbeinn Sigþórsson (1990-03-14) 14 March 1990 (age 31)6426 Flag of Sweden.svg IFK Göteborg
4 FW Jón Daði Böðvarsson (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 29)603 Flag of England.svg Millwall
4 FW Albert Guðmundsson (1997-06-15) 15 June 1997 (age 24)224 Flag of the Netherlands.svg AZ
4 FW Sveinn Aron Guðjohnsen (1998-05-12) 12 May 1998 (age 23)40 Flag of Denmark.svg OB

Recent call-ups

The following players have been called up to the Iceland squad in the last 12 months.

Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClubLatest call-up
GK Patrik Gunnarsson (2000-11-15) 15 November 2000 (age 20)00 Flag of Denmark.svg Silkeborg v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
GK Hannes Þór Halldórsson (1984-04-27) 27 April 1984 (age 37)760 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021

DF Birkir Már Sævarsson (1984-11-11) 11 November 1984 (age 36)983 Flag of Iceland.svg Valur v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Ragnar Sigurðsson (1986-06-19) 19 June 1986 (age 35)975 Flag of Iceland.svg Fylkir v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Kári Árnason (1982-10-13) 13 October 1982 (age 38)896 Flag of Iceland.svg Víkingur Reykjavík v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Jón Guðni Fjóluson (1989-04-10) 10 April 1989 (age 32)171 Flag of Sweden.svg Hammarby v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Hörður Ingi Gunnarsson (1998-08-14) 14 August 1998 (age 22)10 Flag of Iceland.svg FH v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Rúnar Þór Sigurgeirsson (1999-12-28) 28 December 1999 (age 21)10 Flag of Iceland.svg Keflavík v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
DF Ari Freyr Skúlason (1987-05-14) 14 May 1987 (age 34)790 Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Oostende v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
DF Sverrir Ingi Ingason (1993-08-05) 5 August 1993 (age 27)393 Flag of Greece.svg PAOK v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
DF Hörður Björgvin Magnússon (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 (age 28)362 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
DF Hólmar Örn Eyjólfsson (1990-08-06) 6 August 1990 (age 30)192 Flag of Norway.svg Rosenborg v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021

MF Arnór Ingvi Traustason (1993-04-30) 30 April 1993 (age 28)405 Flag of the United States.svg New England Revolution v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
MF Rúnar Már Sigurjónsson (1990-06-18) 18 June 1990 (age 31)322 Flag of Romania.svg CFR Cluj v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
MF Jóhann Berg Guðmundsson (1990-10-27) 27 October 1990 (age 30)798 Flag of England.svg Burnley v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
MF Arnór Sigurðsson (1999-05-15) 15 May 1999 (age 22)141 Flag of Russia.svg CSKA Moscow v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
MF Victor Pálsson (1991-04-30) 30 April 1991 (age 30)261 Flag of Germany.svg Schalke 04 v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
MF Willum Þór Willumsson (1998-10-23) 23 October 1998 (age 22)10 Flag of Belarus.svg BATE Borisov v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
MF Gylfi Sigurðsson (1989-09-08) 8 September 1989 (age 31)7825 Flag of England.svg Everton v. Flag of Germany.svg  Germany , 25 March 2021 WD
MF Emil Hallfreðsson (1984-06-29) 29 June 1984 (age 37)731 Flag of Italy.svg Padova v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium , 8 September 2020
MF Samúel Friðjónsson (1996-02-22) 22 February 1996 (age 25)80 Flag of Norway.svg Viking v. Flag of Belgium (civil).svg  Belgium , 8 September 2020

FW Viðar Örn Kjartansson (1990-03-11) 11 March 1990 (age 31)284 Flag of Norway.svg Vålerenga v. Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico , 30 May 2021
FW Hólmbert Friðjónsson (1993-04-19) 19 April 1993 (age 28)62 Flag of Italy.svg Brescia v. Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein , 31 March 2021
FW Björn Bergmann Sigurðarson (1991-02-26) 26 February 1991 (age 30)171 Flag of Norway.svg Molde v. Flag of Germany.svg  Germany , 25 March 2021 WD
FW Alfreð Finnbogason (1989-02-01) 1 February 1989 (age 32)6115 Flag of Germany.svg FC Augsburg v. Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark , 15 November 2020

INJ Withdrew due to injury
PRE Preliminary squad / standby
RET Retired from the national team
SUS Serving suspension
WD Player withdrew from the squad due to non-injury issue.

.

Previous squads

Records

As of 8 June 2021. [47] [48]
Players in bold are still active with Iceland.

Competitive record

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of Uruguay.svg 1930 Not a FIFA memberNot a FIFA member
Flag of Italy (1861-1946).svg 1934
Flag of France (1794-1815, 1830-1958).svg 1938
Flag of Brazil (1889-1960).svg 1950
Flag of Switzerland.svg 1954 Entry not accepted by FIFADid not participate
Flag of Sweden.svg 1958 Did not qualify4004626
Flag of Chile.svg 1962 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of England.svg 1966
Flag of Mexico.svg 1970
Flag of Germany.svg 1974 Did not qualify6006229
Flag of Argentina.svg 1978 6105212
Flag of Spain.svg 1982 82241021
Flag of Mexico.svg 1986 6105410
Flag of Italy.svg 1990 8143611
Flag of the United States.svg 1994 832376
Flag of France.svg 1998 102351116
Flag of South Korea (1997-2011).svg Flag of Japan.svg 2002 104151420
Flag of Germany.svg 2006 101181427
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010 8125713
Flag of Brazil.svg 2014 125341717
Flag of Russia.svg 2018 Group stage28th30122510712167
Flag of Qatar.svg 2022 To be determinedTo be determined
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of Mexico.svg Flag of the United States.svg 2026
TotalGroup stage1/21301225106281959116215

UEFA European Championship

UEFA European Championship record UEFA European Championship qualifying record
YearRoundPositionPldWDLGFGAPldWDLGFGA
Flag of France.svg 1960 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Spain (1945-1977).svg 1964 Did not qualify201135
Flag of Italy.svg 1968 Did not enterDid not enter
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg 1972
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg 1976 Did not qualify612338
Flag of Italy.svg 1980 8008221
Flag of France.svg 1984 8116313
Flag of Germany.svg 1988 8224414
Flag of Sweden.svg 1992 8206710
Flag of England.svg 1996 8125312
Flag of Belgium (civil).svg Flag of the Netherlands.svg 2000 10433127
Flag of Portugal.svg 2004 8413119
Flag of Austria.svg Flag of Switzerland.svg 2008 122281027
Flag of Poland.svg Flag of Ukraine.svg 2012 8116614
Flag of France.svg 2016 Quarter-finals8th52218910622176
Flag of Europe.svg 2020 Did not qualify127141714
Flag of Germany.svg 2024 To be determinedTo be determined
TotalQuarter-finals1/1652218910730185996159

UEFA Nations League

UEFA Nations League record
YearDivisionGroupPldWDLGFGAP/RRank
Flag of Portugal.svg 2018–19 A 2 4004113Equals-sign-blue.gif12th
Flag of Italy.svg 2020–21 A 2 6006317Red Arrow Down.svg16th
2022–23 B To be determined
Total10001043012th

Honours

FIFA ranking history

Source: [49]

19921993199419951996199719981999200020012002200320042005200620072008200920102011201220132014201520162017201820192020
464739506072644350525858939493908392112104904933362122373946

See also

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The Russia national football team represents the Russian Federation in men's international football and is controlled by the Russian Football Union, the governing body for football in Russia. Russia's home ground is the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow and their current head coach is Valeri Karpin.

Wales national football team results (1980–1999)

The Wales national football team represents Wales in international association football and is governed by the Football Association of Wales (FAW). Between 1980 and 1999 the side played 133 matches, the majority of which came against other European national teams. The British Home Championship, which had been held every year outside wartime since 1894, was disbanded in 1984. The decision to end the competition in its 100th year was blamed largely on low attendance figures, football hooliganism and England and Scotland's desire to play other opponents. Wales came within one match of winning the tournament in the 1980–81 season. They needed only to beat Northern Ireland, but the final game was never played after players refused to travel following an escalation of The Troubles in Ireland. Northern Ireland won the last tournament, held in the 1983–84 season, on goal difference as all four sides finished on equal points.

Iceland at the FIFA World Cup Participation of Icelands national football team in the FIFA World Cup

After 12 failed qualification campaigns, Iceland qualified for the FIFA World Cup, for the first time, in 2018. The 2018 FIFA World Cup was Iceland's second major international tournament, having also qualified for UEFA Euro 2016.

Croatia–Serbia football rivalry

The Croatia–Serbia football rivalry is a competitive sports rivalry that exists between the national football teams of the two countries and their respective sets of fans.

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