Ichon County

Last updated
Ich'ŏn County
이천군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Ich'ŏn-gun
   Revised Romanization Icheon-gun
NK-Gangwon-Ichon.png
Map of Kangwon showing the location of Ichon
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 22 ri

Ich'ŏn County is a kun, or county, in northern Kangwŏn province, North Korea. The terrain is predominantly high and mountainous; the highest point is Myongidoksan, 1,585 meters above sea level. The county's borders run along the Masingryong and Ryongam ranges. The chief stream is the Rimjin River.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Administrative divisions

Ich'ŏn county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 22 ri (villages):

  • Ich'ŏn-ŭp
  • Changdong-ri
  • Changjae-ri
  • Ch'uktong-ri
  • Hakpong-ri
  • Hoesal-li
  • Kaech'ŏl-li
  • Kŏnsŏl-li
  • Mundong-ri
  • Murŭng-ri
  • Ohyŏl-li
  • Ryongjŏl-li
  • Sach'ŏng-ri
  • Sanch'am-ri
  • Sangha-ri
  • Sanji-ri
  • Simdong-ri
  • Sindang-ri
  • Sinhŭng-ri
  • Sŏngbung-ri
  • Songjŏng-ri
  • Umi-ri
  • Ŭnhaengjŏng-ri

Economy

Agriculture

Agriculture is limited to the low-lying regions. Sericulture (silk farming) is also practised. Due to the abundant woods, lumbering is also an important industry.

Agriculture Cultivation of plants and animals to provide useful products

Agriculture is the science and art of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities. The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at least 105,000 years ago, nascent farmers began to plant them around 11,500 years ago. Pigs, sheep and cattle were domesticated over 10,000 years ago. Plants were independently cultivated in at least 11 regions of the world. Industrial agriculture based on large-scale monoculture in the twentieth century came to dominate agricultural output, though about 2 billion people still depended on subsistence agriculture into the twenty-first.

Sericulture process of silk production

Sericulture, or silk farming, is the cultivation of silkworms to produce silk. Although there are several commercial species of silkworms, Bombyx mori is the most widely used and intensively studied silkworm. Silk was believed to have first been produced in China as early as the Neolithic period. Sericulture has become an important cottage industry in countries such as Brazil, China, France, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, and Russia. Today, China and India are the two main producers, with more than 60% of the world's annual production.

Mining

There are deposits of gold, asbestos, nickel and lead in the county.

Gold Chemical element with atomic number 79

Gold is a chemical element with symbol Au and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium.

Asbestos Group of highly stable, non-flammable silicate minerals with a fibrous structure

Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals, which all have in common their asbestiform habit: i.e., long, thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic "fibrils" that can be released by abrasion and other processes. The minerals are chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite, anthophyllite, and actinolite.

Nickel Chemical element with atomic number 28

Nickel is a chemical element with symbol Ni and atomic number 28. It is a silvery-white lustrous metal with a slight golden tinge. Nickel belongs to the transition metals and is hard and ductile. Pure nickel, powdered to maximize the reactive surface area, shows a significant chemical activity, but larger pieces are slow to react with air under standard conditions because an oxide layer forms on the surface and prevents further corrosion (passivation). Even so, pure native nickel is found in Earth's crust only in tiny amounts, usually in ultramafic rocks, and in the interiors of larger nickel–iron meteorites that were not exposed to oxygen when outside Earth's atmosphere.

Transport

Ich'ŏn is served by roads, and by the Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn line of the Korean State Railway.

Chongnyon Ichon Line railway line

The Ch'ŏngnyŏn Ich'ŏn Line is an electrified standard-gauge secondary mainline of the Korean State Railway running from P'yŏngsan on the P'yŏngbu Line to Sep'o on the Kangwŏn Line. The 141.3 km (87.8 mi) line is the southernmost of the three east-west transversal mainlines in North Korea.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Jang Hyuk, who has held the position since 2015.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in east Asia on the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

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