Ida Straus

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Ida Straus
Rosalie Ida Blun Straus.jpg
Isidor and Ida Straus
Born
Rosalie Ida Blun

(1849-02-06)February 6, 1849
Worms, Germany
DiedApril 15, 1912(1912-04-15) (aged 63)
RMS Titanic, Atlantic Ocean
Spouse(s) Isidor Straus (1871–1912)
ChildrenJesse Isidor Straus
Clarence Elias Straus
Percy Seldon Straus
Sara (Straus) Hess
Minnie (Straus) Weil
Hebert Nathan Straus
Vivian (Straus) Dixon
Relatives King Princess (great-great-grandchild)

Rosalie Ida Straus (née Blun; February 6, 1849 – April 15, 1912) was an American homemaker and wife of the co-owner of the Macy's department store. She and her husband Isidor died on board the RMS Titanic.

Macys Department store chain in the United States

Macy's is an American department store chain founded in 1858 by Rowland Hussey Macy. It became a division of the Cincinnati-based Federated Department Stores in 1994, through which it is affiliated with the Bloomingdale's department store chain; the holding company was renamed Macy's, Inc. in 2007. As of 2015, Macy's was the largest U.S. department store company by retail sales. As of February 2019, there were 584 full-line stores with the Macy's nameplate in operation throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Its flagship store is located at Herald Square in the Manhattan borough of New York City. The company had 130,000 employees and earned annual revenue of $24.8 billion as of 2017.

Department store Retail establishment; building which offers a wide range of consumer goods

A department store is a retail establishment offering a wide range of consumer goods in different product categories known as "departments". In modern major cities, the department store made a dramatic appearance in the middle of the 19th century, and permanently reshaped shopping habits, and the definition of service and luxury. Similar developments were under way in London, in Paris and in New York.

Isidor Straus Retailing magnate

Isidor Straus was a German-born American Jewish businessman, politician and co-owner of Macy's department store with his brother Nathan. He also served for just over a year as a member of the United States House of Representatives. He died with his wife, Ida, in the sinking of the passenger ship RMS Titanic.

Contents

Early life

Rosalie Ida Blun was born in 1849 in Worms, Germany to Nathan Blun (1815–1879) and his wife Wilhelmine "Mindel" (née Freudenberg; 1814–1868). She was the fifth of seven children including Amanda (1839–1907), Elias Nathan (1842–1878), Louis (1843–1927), Augusta Carolina (1845–1905), Moritz (1850–1858) and Abraham Blun (1853–1881). She emigrated to the United States with her family.[ when? ]

Worms, Germany Place in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

Worms is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, situated on the Upper Rhine about 60 kilometres south-southwest of Frankfurt-am-Main. It had approximately 82,000 inhabitants as of 2015.

In 1871, Ida Blun married Isidor Straus (1845–1912), a German-Jewish American businessman. She and Isidor had seven children:

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the most populous city is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Jesse I. Straus businessman, diplomat

Jesse Isidor Straus served as the American ambassador to France from 1933 to 1936.

Alfred Fabian Hess was an American physician known for his work on the role of nutrition in scurvy and rickets and for describing the Hess test.

Wedding portrait Rosalie Ida Blun & Isidor (Isador) Straus marriage.jpg
Wedding portrait

The couple was considered especially close by their friends and family; when Isidor traveled as part of his duties as a U.S. Representative for New York or as co-owner of Macy's, they exchanged letters daily.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower house of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

Ida spent the winter of 1911/1912 in Europe with her beloved husband Isidor. They originally planned to return home on a different ship, but switched to Titanic due to a coal strike in England that caused the coal from other ships to be diverted to Titanic.

National coal strike of 1912

The national coal strike of 1912 was the first national strike by coal miners in Britain. Its main goal was securing a minimum wage. After 37 days, the government intervened and ended the strike by passing the Coal Mines Act, establishing a minimum wage for the first time.

Death and legacy

Isidor and Ida Strauss statues being blessed by an angel, "Victims of the Ship Titanic", Yiddish penny song Isidore and Ida Strauss, sacrifices of the ship Titanic.jpg
Isidor and Ida Strauss statues being blessed by an angel, "Victims of the Ship Titanic", Yiddish penny song
The Titanic's Disaster, published in 1912 Titanic-sheet-music.jpg
The Titanic's Disaster, published in 1912

On the night of the sinking, Isidor and Ida Straus were seen standing near Lifeboat No. 8 in the company of Mrs. Straus's maid, Ellen Bird. Although the officer in charge of the lifeboat was willing to allow the elderly couple to board the lifeboat with Miss Bird, Isidor Straus refused to go while there were women and children still remaining on the ship. He urged his wife to board, but she refused, saying, "We have lived together for many years. Where you go, I go." Her words were witnessed by those already in Lifeboat No. 8 as well as many others who were on the boat deck at the time. Isidor and Ida were last seen standing arm in arm on the deck.

When the survivors of the disaster arrived in New York City aboard the RMS Carpathia, many – including Ellen Bird – told reporters of Mrs. Straus's loyalty and fidelity to her husband. Her story struck a chord with people around the world. Rabbis spoke to their congregations about her sacrifice; articles in Yiddish- and German-language newspapers extolled her courage; a popular song featuring the story of Ida Straus, "The Titanic's Disaster", became popular among Jewish Americans.

Although Isidor's body was recovered, Ida's body was not. A cenotaph at the Straus Mausoleum at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx is dedicated to Isidor and Ida together. Its inscription reads: "Many waters cannot quench love – neither can the floods drown it." [1] (Song of Solomon 8:7) The work was designed by James Gamble Rogers, with sculpture by Lee Lawrie. [2]

Portrayals

Memorials

106th Street memorial, Straus Park Titanic 106th St jeh.JPG
106th Street memorial, Straus Park

In addition to the cenotaph at Woodlawn Cemetery, there are three other memorials to Isidor and Ida Straus in their adopted home of New York City:

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Woodlawn Cemetery (Bronx, New York) cemetery in the Bronx, New York City

Woodlawn Cemetery is one of the largest cemeteries in New York City and a designated National Historic Landmark. Located in Woodlawn, Bronx, New York City, it has the character of a rural cemetery. Woodlawn Cemetery opened during the Civil War in 1863, in what was then southern Westchester County, in an area that was annexed to New York City in 1874. It is notable in part as the final resting place of some great American figures, such as authors Countee Cullen, Nellie Bly, and Herman Melville, musicians Irving Berlin, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, W. C. Handy, and Max Roach, husband and wife magicians Alexander Herrmann and Adelaide Herrmann, and businessmen such as shipping magnate Archibald Gracie. Holly Woodlawn, after changing her name to such, falsely told people she was the heiress to Woodlawn Cemetery.

Cenotaph "empty tomb" or monument erected in honor of a person whose remains are elsewhere

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Madeleine Astor American socialite and Titanic survivor

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Nathan Straus American businessman

Nathan Straus was a German-born, American merchant and philanthropist who co-owned two of New York City's biggest department stores, R.H. Macy & Company and Abraham & Straus.

Abraham & Straus

Abraham & Straus, commonly shortened to A&S, was a major New York City department store, based in Brooklyn. Founded in 1865, it became part of Federated Department Stores in 1929. Shortly after Federated's 1994 acquisition of R.H. Macy & Company, it eliminated the A&S brand. Most A&S stores took the Macy's name, although a few became part of Stern's, another Federated division, but one that offered lower-end goods than did Macy's or A&S.

Donald Blun Straus was an American educator and an executive in public service. Straus, who held A.B. and M.B.A. degrees from Harvard University, served as President of the American Arbitration Association, Executive Vice President of the Health Insurance Plan of Greater New York, Chair of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, and a trustee of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Institute for Advanced Study. An early advocate of online education and public referendums via computers and the Web, he taught an online course in "Democracy in the 21st Century" for Connected Education in the late-1980s and early-1990s. He served as Faculty Associate and was a Life Trustee at the College of the Atlantic in Maine.

Archibald Gracie IV author and survivor of the Titanic

Archibald Gracie IV was an American writer, soldier, amateur historian, real estate investor, and survivor of the sinking of RMS Titanic. He was the first adult survivor to die after rescue. He survived the sinking by climbing aboard an overturned collapsible lifeboat and wrote a popular book about the disaster, which is still in print today.

Passengers of the RMS <i>Titanic</i> Wikimedia list article

A total of 2,224 people sailed on the maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic, the second of the White Star Line's Olympic-class ocean liners, from Southampton, England, to New York City. Partway through the voyage, the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the early morning of 15 April 1912, resulting in the deaths of over 1,500 people, including about 815 of the passengers.

<i>Titanic</i> Memorial (New York City) lighthouse in New York, United States

The Titanic Memorial is a 60-foot-tall (18 m) lighthouse located at Fulton and Pearl streets in Manhattan, New York City. It was built, due in part to the instigation of Margaret Brown, to remember the people who died on the RMS Titanic on April 15, 1912. Its design incorporates the use of a time ball.

Evelyn Marsden was the only Australian female survivor of the sinking of RMS Titanic and was rescued in lifeboat 16.

Straus Park

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Lifeboats of the RMS <i>Titanic</i>

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Rhoda Mary Abbott was a passenger on the RMS Titanic. She was the only female passenger who went down with the sinking of the ship and survived.

Dickinson Bishop Titanic survivor

Dickinson H. Bishop was an American businessman who traveled on board the ill-fated maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic while on his honeymoon with bride Helen, née Walton. They both survived the sinking of the Titanic on 15 April 1912.

Ellen Sulzberger Straus (1926–1995) was an American businesswoman and philanthropist who founded the United States' first telephone help line.

References

  1. "Many Waters Cannot Quench Love"
  2. Harm, Gregory Paul, Lee Lawrie's Prairie Deco: History in Stone at the Nebraska State Capitol, Concierge Marketing, Omaha, NE, 2018 p. 56