Ieronymos II of Athens

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Ieronymos II
Archbishop of Athens
Archbishop Ieronymos II of Athens - declaration ceremony 2008Feb12.jpg
Native name
Ιερώνυμος B΄
Installed7 February 2008
Predecessor Christodoulos
Other posts Metropolitan of Thebes and Levadeia (1981–2008)
Orders
Ordination1967
Consecration1981
Personal details
Birth nameIoannis Liapis
Born (1938-03-10) 10 March 1938 (age 81)
Oinofyta, Boeotia, Greece
Nationality Greek
Denomination Orthodoxy
Profession Theologian
Alma mater University of Athens
University of Graz
University of Regensburg
University of Munich

Ieronymos II (Greek : Ιερώνυμος B’, romanized: Ierōnymos II, pronounced  [ʝeˈronimos] ; born March 10, 1938) is the Archbishop of Athens and All Greece and as such the primate of the Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Greece. He was elected on 7 February 2008. [1]

Greek language Language spoken in Greece, Cyprus and Southern Albania

Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean and the Black Sea. It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning more than 3000 years of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary, were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems.

Romanization of Greek is the transliteration (letter-mapping) or transcription (sound-mapping) of text from the Greek alphabet into the Latin alphabet. The conventions for writing and romanizing Ancient Greek and Modern Greek differ markedly, which can create confusion. The sound of the English letter B was written as β in ancient Greek but is now written as the digraph μπ, while the modern β sounds like the English letter V instead. The Greek name Ἰωάννης became Johannes in Latin and then John in English, but in Greek itself has instead become Γιάννης; this might be written as Yannis, Jani, Ioannis, Yiannis, or Giannis, but not Giannes or Giannēs as it would have been in ancient Greek. The masculine Greek word Ἅγιος or Άγιος might variously appear as Hagiοs, Agios, Aghios, or Ayios, or simply be translated as "Holy" or "Saint" in English forms of Greek placenames.

Primate (bishop) High-ranking bishop in certain Christian churches

Primate is a title or rank bestowed on some archbishops in certain Christian churches. Depending on the particular tradition, it can denote either jurisdictional authority or (usually) ceremonial precedence.

Contents

Early life and career

He was born Ioannis Liapis (Greek : Ιωάννης Λιάπης, Iōánnēs Liápēs) in Oinofyta, Boeotia. [2] He is an Arvanite Greek. [3]

Oinofyta Place in Greece

Oinofyta is a village and former municipality in eastern Boeotia, Greece. Following the local government reform of 2011 it is now part of the municipality of Tanagra, of which it is a municipal unit. The municipal unit has an area of 77.273 km2, the community 18.643 km2. Within the territory of the municipal unit lies the ancient town of Oenophyta, where the Battle of Oenophyta was fought in 457 BCE.

Boeotia Regional unit in Central Greece, Greece

Boeotia, sometimes alternatively Latinised as Boiotia, or Beotia, is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the region of Central Greece. Its capital is Livadeia, and its largest city is Thebes.

Arvanites are a bilingual population group in Greece who traditionally speak Arvanitika, a dialect of Albanian, along with Greek. They settled in southern Greece during the late Middle Ages and were the dominant population element in parts of the Peloponnese, Attica and Boeotia until the 19th century. Arvanites today self-identify as Greeks as a result of a process of assimilation, and do not consider themselves Albanian. They call themselves Arvanites and Arbëror. Arvanitika is in a state of attrition due to language shift towards Greek and large-scale internal migration to the cities and subsequent intermingling of the population during the 20th century.

Ieronymos holds degrees in archaeology, Byzantine studies, and theology from the University of Athens. He has undertaken postgraduate studies at the University of Graz, the University of Regensburg and the University of Munich. [2] Following a stint as lector in Christian archaeology at the Athens Archaeological Society under professor Anastasios Orlandos, he taught as a philologist in Lycée Léonin and he was ordained deacon and then presbyter in the Orthodox Church in 1967. [2]

Archaeology, or archeology, is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities. In North America archaeology is a sub-field of anthropology, while in Europe it is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines.

Byzantine Empire Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire or Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople. It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural and military force in Europe. "Byzantine Empire" is a term created after the end of the realm; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire, or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".

Theology is the systematic study of the nature of the divine and, more broadly, of religious belief. It is taught as an academic discipline, typically in universities and seminaries. It occupies itself with the unique content of analyzing the supernatural, but also especially with epistemology, and asks and seeks to answer the question of revelation. Revelation pertains to the acceptance of God, gods, or deities, as not only transcendent or above the natural world, but also willing and able to interact with the natural world and, in particular, to reveal themselves to humankind. While theology has turned into a secular field, religious adherents still consider theology to be a discipline that helps them live and understand concepts such as life and love and that helps them lead lives of obedience to the deities they follow or worship.

Ieronymos served as Protosyncellus of the Metropolis of Thebes and Livadeia, abbot of the monasteries of the Transfiguration of Sagmata and Hosios Loukas, and Secretary, later Archsecretary, of the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece. In 1981 he was elected Metropolitan Bishop of Thebes and Levadeia. In addition to his pastoral ministry, Ieronymos has been pursuing his work on Christian archaeology and has published two major textbooks: "Medieval Monuments of Euboea" (1970), and "Christian Boeotia" (2006). In 1998, he unsuccessfully contested the election to the throne of the archbishopric of Athens. [2]

Protosyncellus principal deputy of the bishop of an eparchy

A protosyncellus or protosynkellos is the principal deputy of the bishop of an eparchy for the exercise of administrative authority in an Eastern Orthodox or Eastern Catholic church. The equivalent position in the Western Christian churches is vicar general.

The Metropolis of Thebes and Livadeia is a metropolitan see of the Church of Greece in Boeotia, Greece. Since the Middle Ages it has also existed as a Roman Catholic titular see. The current metropolitan is Georgios Mantzouranis.

Abbot Religious title

Abbot, meaning father, is an ecclesiastical title given to the male head of a monastery in various traditions, including Christianity. The office may also be given as an honorary title to a clergyman who is not the head of a monastery. The female equivalent is abbess.

On 7 February 2008, Ieronymos was elected the new Archbishop of Athens and All Greece by the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece, [4] receiving 45 out of 74 votes in a two-ballot process. [5] He formally took office on 16 February 2008.

As of 2016, Ieronymos, is involved in a dispute with Patriarch Bartholomew I of Constantinople over who has ecclesiastical authority over certain parts of Greece. [6]

Bartholomew I of Constantinople Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople

Bartholomew I is the 270th and current Archbishop of Constantinople and Ecumenical Patriarch, since 2 November 1991. In accordance with his title, he is regarded as the primus inter pares in the Eastern Orthodox Church, and as the spiritual leader of 300 million Orthodox Christians worldwide.

On 16 April 2016 he visited, together with Pope Francis and Bartholomew I of Constantinople, the Mòria camp in the island of Lesbos, to call the attention of the world to the refugee issue. [7]

Titles

Styles of
Archbishop Ieronymos II of Athens
Archdiocese of Athens emblem.svg
Reference style His Beatitude
Spoken styleYour Beatitude (Makariótate), Déspota
Religious styleArchbishop

The official title of the Archbishop of Athens and All Greece is:

His Beatitude Ieronymos II, Archbishop of Athens and All Greece;

in Greek:

Η Αυτού Μακαριότης ο Αρχιεπίσκοπος Αθηνών και Πάσης Ελλάδος Ιερώνυμος Β'

Social and political views

In 2012, Ieronymos criticized racism, antisemitism, Islamophobia and the Golden Dawn party, saying that "The church loves all people, including those who are black, white or non-Christians." [8]

Notes and references

  1. "Greek Orthodox bishops elect leader" Archived 2008-02-13 at the Wayback Machine , CNN.com/europe. Accessed 7 February 2008.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Ο μητροπολίτης Θηβών εξελέγη νέος Αρχιεπίσκοπος", (in Greek), Accessed 7 February 2008.
  3. Bintliff, John (2003), "The Ethnoarchaeology of a “Passive” Ethnicity: The Arvanites of Central Greece" in K.S. Brown and Yannis Hamilakis, eds., The Usable Past: Greek Metahistories, Lexington Books. p.139
  4. "Bulletin of the Church of Greece. Accessed 7 February 2008.
  5. "New Leader Named for Greek Orthodox Church, New York Times , 2008-02-07
  6. "Pope Francis skips many niceties in announcing a visit to Lesbos". The Economist. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  7. Pope Francis visits Lesbos. The Guardian. Published: 16 April 2016
  8. "Greek Jews fight neo-Nazi party".
Eastern Orthodox Church titles
Preceded by
Christodoulos
Archbishop of Athens and All Greece
2008 – present
Incumbent

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