Imperial Guards (Qing China)

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Imperial Guards
侍衛
Flag of China (1889-1912).svg
Active1644–1912
Disbanded1912
CountryFlag of the Qing Dynasty (1889-1912).svg  Qing Dynasty
Allegiance Imperial standard of the Qing Emperor.svg Emperor of China
Type Imperial guard
Infantry
Role Close protection
Garrison/HQ Forbidden City, Beijing
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Zaitao
A guard from the late 1700s. Manchuguard.jpg
A guard from the late 1700s.

The Imperial Guards (Chinese :侍衛; pinyin :shìwèi) of the Qing dynasty were a select detachment of Manchu and Mongol bannermen responsible for guarding the Forbidden City in Beijing, the emperor, and the emperor's family. The Imperial Guards were divided into three groups: [1] the Guard Corps, the Vanguard, and the Imperial Bodyguard. [2]

Contents

Guard Corps

The Guard Corps (Manchu: bayara; simplified Chinese :护军; traditional Chinese :護軍; pinyin :hùjūn) was assigned to protect the imperial palace. Soldiers from the Manchu and Mongol banners would be admitted to serve in the unit. The Guard corps was about ten times the size of the Vanguard and Imperial Bodyguards, and was the largest formation of the Imperial Guards. [2]

Vanguard

The Vanguard (Manchu: gabsihiyan; simplified Chinese :前锋; traditional Chinese :前鋒; pinyin :qiánfēng) corps was assigned to march ahead of the emperor when he left the palace. Soldiers from the Manchu and Mongol banners could join. The Vanguard consisted of about 1500 men. [2]

Imperial Bodyguard

The Imperial Bodyguard (Manchu: hiya; simplified Chinese :领侍衛; traditional Chinese :領侍衛; pinyin :lǐngshìwèi) corps was assigned to protect the emperor at all times. Only Manchu bannermen could join, and most members came from the upper three banners. Like the Vanguard, the Imperial Bodyguard consisted of about 1500 men. [2]

See also

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