In Favor of the Sensitive Man

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In Favor of the Sensitive Man: And Other Essays
In Favor of the Sensitive Man.jpg
First-edition cover
Author Anaïs Nin
LanguageEnglish
Genre Essays
PublisherHarcourt Brace Jovanovic
Publication date
1976
Media typePrint
Pages169
ISBN 978-0-156-44445-3

In Favor of the Sensitive Man: And Other Essays is a collection of essays published by Anaïs Nin in 1976. [1]

Anaïs Nin writer of novels, short stories, and erotica

Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell, known professionally as Anaïs Nin was a French-Cuban American diarist, essayist, novelist, and writer of short stories and erotica. Born to Cuban parents in France, Nin was the daughter of composer Joaquín Nin and Rosa Culmell, a classically trained singer. Nin spent her early years in Spain and Cuba, about sixteen years in Paris (1924–1940), and the remaining half of her life in the United States, where she became an established author.

Content

Women and men

(i) An Interview (ii) Notes on Feminism (iii) My Sister, My Spouse (iv) Between Me And Life (v) Women and Children in Japan (vi) In Favor of the Sensitive Man

Writing, Music and Films

Enchanted Places

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References