Independence Rock (Wyoming)

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Independence Rock
Independence Rock WY.jpg
Independence Rock
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Location in Wyoming
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Location in United States
Location60 mi (97 km) SW of Casper on WYO 220, Natrona County, Wyoming
Coordinates 42°29′38″N107°07′59″W / 42.494°N 107.133°W / 42.494; -107.133 Coordinates: 42°29′38″N107°07′59″W / 42.494°N 107.133°W / 42.494; -107.133
Area170 acres (69 ha)
NRHP reference No. 66000757 [1]
Significant dates
Added to NRHPOctober 15, 1966
Designated NHLJanuary 20, 1961 [2]

Independence Rock is a large granite rock, approximately 130 feet (40 m) high, 1,900 feet (580 m) long, and 850 feet (260 m) wide, which is in southwestern Natrona County, Wyoming along Wyoming Highway 220. During the middle of the 19th century, it formed a prominent and well-known landmark on the Oregon, Mormon, and California emigrant trails. Many of these emigrants carved their names on it, and it was described by early missionary and explorer Father Pierre-Jean De Smet in 1840 as the Register of the Desert. [3] The site was designated a National Historic Landmark on January 20, 1961 [2] and is now part of Independence Rock State Historic Site, owned and operated by the state of Wyoming.

Contents

Description

The rock is a large rounded monolith of Archean granite typical of the surrounding region and is an isolated peak at the southeast end of the Granite Mountains. Its appearance is somewhat like the rounded Enchanted Rock of Texas or Uluru in Australia (formerly known as Ayers Rock), although smaller in size. It is located in the high plateau region of central Wyoming, north of the Sentinel Rocks ridge and adjacent to the Sweetwater River. [4] It is accessible from a rest area on Wyoming Highway 220, approximately 20 miles (32 km) northeast of Muddy Gap and 60 miles (97 km) south-west of Casper.

History

The rock derives its name from the fact that it lies directly along the route of the Emigrant Trail. Pioneering wagon parties bound for Oregon or California usually left the Missouri River in the early spring and hoped to reach the rock by July 4 (Independence Day in the United States), in order to reach their destinations before the first mountain snowfalls. John C. Frémont camped a mile below this site on August 1, 1843 and made this entry in the journal of his 1843-'44 expedition: [5]

Everywhere within six or eight feet of the ground, where the surface is sufficiently smooth, and in some places sixty or eighty feet above, the rock is inscribed with the names of travelers. Many a name famous in the history of this country, and some well known to science, are to be found among those of traders and travelers.

Fremont carved a large cross into the rock monolith, which was blasted off the rock on July 4, 1847 by hundreds of California and Oregon emigrants who had gathered on the site. [6] Some Protestants considered the cross to be a symbol of the Pope and Catholicism. [6] John Frémont was actually a member of the United States Episcopal Church. [7]

On July 4, 1862, Independence Rock was the site of Wyoming's first Masonic Lodge meeting. [3]

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Split Rock (Wyoming) United States historic place

Split Rock, also known as Twin Peaks, is a mountain in the Granite Mountains of central Wyoming. The peak has an elevation of 7,305 feet (2,227 m), and is located about 10 miles (16 km) north of the Muddy Gap junction between Casper and Rawlins. The mountain is distinctive for a deep V-shaped cleft dividing its summit. The mountain was a prominent landmark on the Oregon Trail and other early settlement routes in the region, which crossed a low rise at the eastern end of the range between Casper and the North Platte River valley and the Sweetwater River.

References

  1. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. 1 2 "Independence Rock". National Historic Landmark summary listing. National Park Service. Archived from the original on 2009-04-03. Retrieved 2009-03-22.
  3. 1 2 Official State Highway Map of Wyoming (Map). Wyoming Department of Transportation. 2014.
  4. Independence Rock, Wyoming, 7.5 Minute Topographic Quadrangle, USGS, 1951
  5. Fremont, John, et al., Report of the exploring expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the year 1842, Gales and Seaton, printers, 1845
  6. 1 2 Wyoming: A Guide to Its History, Highways and People (American Guide Series), Native American Books Distributor, 2007, pp. 386-7 ISBN   978-0403021994
  7. Bigelow, John, Memoir Of The Life And Public Services Of John Charles Fremont, Kessinger Publishing, 2006, p. 465 ISBN   978-1428655478