Industrial dance

Last updated

Industrial dance music is a North American alternative term for electronic body music and electro-industrial music. Fans who are associated with this music scene, refer to themselves as rivetheads.

Contents

In general, "industrial dance" is characterized by its "electronic beats, symphonic keyboard lines, pile-driver rhythms, angst-ridden or sampled vocals, and cyberpunk imagery". [1] [2]

Since the mid-1980s, [3] the term "industrial dance" has been used to describe the music of Cabaret Voltaire (early 1980s), [4] [5] early Die Krupps, [6] Portion Control, [7] The Neon Judgement, [6] Clock DVA, [8] Nitzer Ebb, [9] [10] Skinny Puppy, Front Line Assembly, [11] [12] [13] Front 242, [2] [6] [10] [14] Ministry, [15] KMFDM, [16] [17] [18] Yeht Mae, [8] Meat Beat Manifesto, Manufacture, [19] Nine Inch Nails, [20] [15] [21] My Life with the Thrill Kill Kult, [22] Leæther Strip [23] or early Spahn Ranch. [24]

In March 1989, Spin Magazine presented an one-paged article about the industrial dance movement in Canada and the U.S. [19]

  • Black Monday (US)
  • Bodystyler (G)
  • Crewzine (SK)
  • Culture Shock (US)
  • Dissonance (US)
  • Electronic Disease (G)
  • Engine (BR)
  • GEAR Magazine (US)
  • Godsend Magazine (US)
  • In Perpetual Motion (US)
  • IndustrialnatioN (US)
  • Infectious Substance (US)
  • Interface (US)
  • NRG. (G)
  • Neurostyle (G)
  • New Life (CH / G)
  • Permission (US)
  • Revotnik (G)
  • Shadow Cast (G)
  • Side-Line (B)
  • Substitution (US)
  • Sur-face (G)
  • Technology Works (US)
  • Terra Industria (US)
  • Under the Flag (B)
  • Vertigo (G)
  • Voltage (US)
  • Zone (G)

2010s

In the 2010s a revival in industrial dance music occurred with the rise of Witch House and Witch House related groups. Artists such as Zola Jesus, Sevdaliza, Nurgul Jones, and MachineGirl are examples of revived dance music with industrial and transgressive themes. Industrial dance music has seen a greater revival within Russia and Eastern Europe, more prominent within youth culture there.

See also

Sources

  1. 1 2 Marras, Amerigo (1999). ECO-TEC: Architecture of the In-Between -. Princeton Architectural Press. p. 54. ISBN   1568981597.
  2. 1 2 Tony Fletcher: Let's Go - Lollapalooza '93, SPIN magazine, July 1993, p. 44
  3. Gail Priest (2009). Experimental Music: Audio Explorations in Australia. University of New South Wales Press. p. 48. ISBN   1-921410-07-8.
  4. Holly George-Warren / Patricia Romanowski / Jon Pareles: The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, p. 140, Fireside, 2001, ISBN   0-7432-0120-5
  5. Knowles, Christopher (2010). The Secret History of Rock 'n' Roll. Viva Editions. p. 236. ISBN   9781573444057 via the Internet Archive.
  6. 1 2 3 David Nobahkt: Suicide: No Compromise, p. 166, SAF Publishing Ltd., 2004, ISBN   0-946719-71-3
  7. The Wire, Volume 269-274, p. 32, C. Parker, 2006
  8. 1 2 Rudy von Bitter Rucker / R. U. Sirius / Queen Mu: Mondo 2000: A User's Guide to the New Edge, HarperPerennial, 1992, ISBN   0-06-096928-8
  9. Tony Fletcher (February 1992). "Hard-boiled Ebb – Interview with Nitzer Ebb". Spin . pp. 16–17. Retrieved October 24, 2017.
  10. 1 2 Christian Zingales: Electronica, p. 59, Giunti Gruppo Editoriale, 2002, ISBN   88-09-02523-7
  11. David Jarman: Review of the album „Flavour of the Weak“ by Front Line Assembly, CMJ New Music Monthly, p. 50, April 1998
  12. David Jarman: Review of the album „Implode“ by Front Line Assembly, CMJ New Music Monthly, p. 44, August 1999
  13. Vladimir Bogdanov / Chris Woodstra / Stephen Thomas Erlewine: All Music Guide to Electronica: The Definitive Guide to Electronic Music, p. 198, Backbeat Books, 2001, ISBN   0-87930-628-9
  14. Macdonald - Heidi (May 1998). "Front 242 - Mut@ge.Mix@ge". CMJ (57). ISSN   1074-6978.
  15. 1 2 Jim DeRogatis (2003). Milk it!: Collected Musings on the Alternative Music Explosion of the 90s. Da Capo Press. p. 95. ISBN   0-306-81271-1. Big Black's relentless noise guitars, jackhammer rhythms and lyrical tales of America's underbelly continue to inspire cutting-edge bands such as Helmet, Tar and, the Jesus Lizard", as well as industrial dance groups such as Nine Inch Nails and Ministry.
  16. Eddy, Chuck (July 1992). "KMFDM, Money, Wax Trax!". Spins. Spin Magazine . Vol. 8 no. 4. p. 71. Retrieved August 21, 2018 via Google Books.
  17. Amy Sciarretto: Wax Trax! / TVT Offers KMFDM's Final Statement with „Adios“, CMJ New Music Report, p. 1, 5. April 1999
  18. Amy Sciarretto: Review of the album „MDFMK“ by MDFMK, CMJ New Music Report, p. 22, 14. February 2000
  19. 1 2 Leland, John (March 1989). "A Dilettante's Guide to Industrial Dance Music". Singles. Spin Magazine. Vol. 4 no. 12. p. 78. Retrieved August 21, 2018 via Google Books.
  20. Eddy, Chuck (June 1998). "Metal Machine Music". Spin Magazine. Vol. 14 no. 6. p. 139. ISSN   0886-3032.
  21. Taylor, Steve (2006). The A to X of Alternative Music. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 165. ISBN   0826482171.
  22. Jacks, Kelso (November 1999). "Recordnews". CMJ . Vol. 60 no. 643. p. 10. ISSN   0890-0795.
  23. Industrial Dance : Significant Albums, Artists and Songs, Most Viewed : AllMusic
  24. David Jarman: Review of the album „Beat Noir“ by Spahn Ranch, CMJ New Music Monthly, p. 51, January 1999