Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld

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Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld
Nederlandse planetoiden.jpg
Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld (sitting, right)
Born
Ingrid Groeneveld

(1921-10-21)21 October 1921 [1]
Died30 March 2015(2015-03-30) (aged 93)
Oegstgeest, Netherlands
ResidenceNetherlands
NationalityDutch
Known for Minor planets
Spouse(s) Cornelis Johannes van Houten
ChildrenKarel van Houten
Scientific career
Fields Astronomy
Institutions Leiden Observatory
Palomar Observatory
Minor planets discovered: 4629 [2]
see § List of discovered minor planets

Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈɪŋɡrɪt fɑn ˈɦʌutə(ŋ) ˈɣrunəˌvɛlt] ; [3] 21 October 1921 – 30 March 2015) was a Dutch astronomer.

Astronomer scientist who studies celestial bodies

An astronomer is a scientist in the field of astronomy who focuses their studies on a specific question or field outside the scope of Earth. They observe astronomical objects such as stars, planets, moons, comets, and galaxies – in either observational or theoretical astronomy. Examples of topics or fields astronomers study include planetary science, solar astronomy, the origin or evolution of stars, or the formation of galaxies. Related but distinct subjects like physical cosmology, which studies the Universe as a whole.

Contents

In a jointly credited trio with Tom Gehrels and her husband Cornelis Johannes van Houten, she was the discoverer of many thousands of asteroids (credited by the Minor Planet Center with the discovery of 4,625 numbered minor planets). [2] In the Palomar–Leiden survey, Gehrels took the images using the 48-inch Schmidt telescope at Palomar Observatory and shipped the photographic plates to the van Houtens at Leiden Observatory, who analyzed them for new asteroids. The trio are jointly credited with several thousand asteroid discoveries. [4] [5] Van Houten-Groeneveld died on 30 March 2015, at the age of 93, in Oegstgeest, Netherlands. [6]

Tom Gehrels astronomer

Anton M.J. "Tom" Gehrels was a Dutch–American astronomer, Professor of Planetary Sciences, and Astronomer at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

Cornelis Johannes van Houten was a Dutch astronomer, sometimes referred to as Kees van Houten.

Asteroid Minor planet that is not a comet

Asteroids are minor planets, especially of the inner Solar System. Larger asteroids have also been called planetoids. These terms have historically been applied to any astronomical object orbiting the Sun that did not resemble a planet-like disc and was not observed to have characteristics of an active comet such as a tail. As minor planets in the outer Solar System were discovered they were typically found to have volatile-rich surfaces similar to comets. As a result, they were often distinguished from objects found in the main asteroid belt. In this article, the term "asteroid" refers to the minor planets of the inner Solar System including those co-orbital with Jupiter.

The Themistian main-belt asteroid 1674 Groeneveld – discovered by Karl Reinmuth at Heidelberg and independently discovered by Finnish astronomer Yrjö Väisälä in 1938, was named in her honor ( M.P.C. 2901). [7]

The Themis family is a family of carbonaceous asteroids located in the outer portion of the asteroid belt, at a mean distance of 3.13 AU from the Sun. It is one of the largest families with over 4700 known members, and consists of a well-defined core of larger bodies surrounded by a region of smaller ones. The collisional Themis family is named after its parent body, the asteroid 24 Themis, discovered on 5 April 1853 by Italian astronomer Annibale de Gasparis.

Yrjö Väisälä Finnish astronomer and physicist

Yrjö Väisälä[ˈyrjø ˈʋæisælæ](listen) was a Finnish astronomer and physicist.

Publications

The bibcode is a compact identifier used by several astronomical data systems to uniquely specify literature references.

Digital object identifier Character string used as a permanent identifier for a digital object, in a format controlled by the International DOI Foundation

In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to identify objects uniquely, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). An implementation of the Handle System, DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos.

Related Research Articles

2934 Aristophanes, provisional designation 4006 P-L, is a carbonaceous Veritasian asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 22 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden survey in 1960, and later named after ancient Greek dramatist Aristophanes.

2436 Hatshepsut, provisional designation 6066 P-L, is a Hygiean asteroid from the outer asteroid belt, approximately 19 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Cornelis van Houten, Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory on 24 September 1960. It was named for pharaoh Hatshepsut.

1810 Epimetheus, provisional designation 4196 P-L, is a stony Florian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 8 kilometers in diameter.

39382 Opportunity, also designated 2696 P-L, is a dark Hilidan asteroid from the outermost region of the asteroid belt, approximately 7.5 kilometers in diameter. Discovered during the Palomar–Leiden survey at Palomar Observatory in 1960, it was named for NASA's Opportunity Mars rover.

10979 Fristephenson, provisional designation 4171 T-2, is a carbonaceous Sulamitis asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey on 29 September 1973, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The dark C-type asteroid was named for British historian of astronomy F. Richard Stephenson.

1869 Philoctetes, provisional designation 4596 P-L, is a Jupiter trojan from the Greek camp, approximately 23 kilometers in diameter.

8776 Campestris, provisional designation 2287 T-3, is a stony background asteroid from the central region of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 16 October 1977, by Dutch astronomer couple Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden Observatory, and Dutch–American astronomer Tom Gehrels at the Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The asteroid was named for the endangered bird tawny pipit.

10656 Albrecht, provisional designation 2213 T-1, is a carbonaceous background asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was named after German astronomer Carl Theodor Albrecht.

5196 Bustelli, provisional designation 3102 T-2, is a stony Eunomian asteroid from the central regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 6 kilometers kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 30 September 1973, by Dutch astronomers Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels the Palomar Observatory. The S-type asteroid was named after Italian-Swiss artist Franz Anton Bustelli.

10660 Felixhormuth, provisional designation 4348 T-1, is a background asteroid from the outer regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 26 March 1971, by Dutch astronomer couple Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Dutch–American astronomer Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The asteroid was named after German astronomer Felix Hormuth.

1777 Gehrels, also designated 4007 P-L, is a stony asteroid from the middle region of the asteroid belt, approximately 13 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden survey in 1960, and named for astronomer Tom Gehrels, one of the survey's principal investigators and credited discoverer.

1924 Horus, provisional designation 4023 P-L, is a dark asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 12 kilometers in diameter. Discovered during the Palomar–Leiden survey in 1960, it was later named after Horus from Egyptian mythology.

1776 Kuiper, provisional designation 2520 P-L, is a dark Eoan asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 38 kilometers in diameter.

1877 Marsden, provisional designation 1971 FC, is a carbonaceous Hildian asteroid from the outermost region of the asteroid belt, approximately 35 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey in 1971, and named after British astronomer Brian Marsden.

3868 Mendoza, provisional designation 4575 P-L is a stony Vestian asteroid and binary system from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 9 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 24 September 1960, by astronomers Cornelis Johannes van Houten, Ingrid van Houten-Groeneveld and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory.

1923 Osiris, provisional designation 4011 P-L, is a dark asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 13 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 24 September 1960, by Ingrid and Cornelis Johannes van Houten at Leiden, on photographic plates taken by Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in the United States. It was named after the Egyptian god Osiris.

1778 Alfvén, also designated 4506 P-L, is a carbonaceous Themistian asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, approximately 20 kilometers in diameter.

10251 Mulisch, provisional designation 3089 T-1, is a bright background asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 2.4 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered during the Palomar–Leiden Trojan survey on 26 March 1971, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The asteroid was named after Dutch writer Harry Mulisch.

10244 Thüringer Wald, provisional designation 4668 P-L, is a Vestian asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 3.3 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 26 September 1960, by Ingrid and Cornelis van Houten at Leiden, and Tom Gehrels at Palomar Observatory in California, United States. The asteroid was named after the Thuringian Forest, a German mountain range.

The Palomar–Leiden survey (PLS) was a successful astronomical survey to study faint minor planets in a collaboration between the U.S Palomar Observatory and the Dutch Leiden Observatory, and resulted in the discovery of thousands of asteroids, including many Jupiter trojans.

References

  1. Groeneveld, Ingrid (1957). "Mitteilungen, Nummers 9-16". Veroeffentlichungen der Badischen Landes-Sternwarte zu Heidelberg (in German). 14 (5): 75.
  2. 1 2 "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 12 January 2017. Retrieved 1 February 2017.
  3. In isolation, van and Houten are pronounced [vɑn] and [ˈɦʌutə(n)] , respectively.
  4. "SETI Institute - Long-Lost, Dangerous Asteroid Is Found Again". Seti.org. 2007-10-04. Retrieved 2010-12-03.
  5. Saiber, Arielle (2005). Giordano Bruno and the geometry of ... - Google Books. ISBN   9780754633211 . Retrieved 2010-12-03.
  6. (in Dutch) Leidse sterrenkundige Ingrid van Houten overleden (21 oktober 1921-30 maart 2015), Astronomie.nl, 2015. Retrieved on 31 March 2015.
  7. Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(1674) Groeneveld". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (1674) Groeneveld. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 133. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_1675. ISBN   978-3-540-00238-3.