Inuyama, Aichi

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Inuyama

犬山市
Inuyama Castle and Kiso River.JPG
Inuyama Castle, landmark place in Inuyama
Flag of Inuyama, Aichi.svg
Flag
Emblem of Inuyama, Aichi.svg
Emblem
Inuyama in Aichi Prefecture Ja.svg
Location of Inuyama in Aichi Prefecture
Japan location map with side map of the Ryukyu Islands.svg
Red pog.svg
Inuyama
 
Coordinates: 35°22′43″N136°56′40.2″E / 35.37861°N 136.944500°E / 35.37861; 136.944500 Coordinates: 35°22′43″N136°56′40.2″E / 35.37861°N 136.944500°E / 35.37861; 136.944500
Country Japan
Region Chūbu (Tōkai)
Prefecture Aichi
First official recorded3 BC
City SettledApril 1, 1954
Government
  Mayor Takuro Yamada (from 2014)
Area
  Total74.90 km2 (28.92 sq mi)
Population
 (October 1, 2019)
  Total73,420
  Density980/km2 (2,500/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
- Tree Chinese hawthorn
- Flower Sakura
Phone number0568-61-1800
Address36 Higashihata, Inuyama, Inuyama-shi, Aichi-ken 484-0081
Website Official website
Inuyama City Hall Inuyama City Hall ac.jpg
Inuyama City Hall
Inuyama skyline Meitetsu Inuyama Hotel and Inuyama Castle.JPG
Inuyama skyline
DownTown of InuyamaCity Inuyama Station East03.jpg
DownTown of InuyamaCity
Inuyama Bridge Inuyama Bridge at the evening twilight time.jpg
Inuyama Bridge
Inuyama Festival Inuyama Festival.jpg
Inuyama Festival

Inuyama (犬山市, Inuyama-shi) is a city in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 October 2019, the city had an estimated population of 73,420 in 31,276 households, [1] and a population density of 980 persons per km². The total area of the city is 74.90 square kilometres (28.92 sq mi). The name of the city literally transliterates to "Dog Mountain". The name appears in historical records from 1336 AD, but its origin is unknown.

Contents

Geography

Inuyama lies along the northwestern edge of Aichi Prefecture, separated from neighboring Gifu Prefecture by the Kiso River.

Surrounding municipalities

Aichi Prefecture

Gifu Prefecture

Demographics

Per Japanese census data, [2] the population of Inuyama has been increasing over the past 70 years.

Historical population
YearPop.±%
1940 26,079    
1950 35,145+34.8%
1960 38,202+8.7%
1970 50,594+32.4%
1980 64,614+27.7%
1990 69,801+8.0%
2000 72,583+4.0%
2010 75,151+3.5%

Climate

The city has a climate characterized by hot and humid summers, and relatively mild winters (Köppen climate classification Cfa). The average annual temperature in Inuyama is 15.1 °C. The average annual rainfall is 1910 mm with September as the wettest month. The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 27.6 °C, and lowest in January, at around 3.4 °C. [3]

History

Inuyama Old Town Inuyamajokamachi.JPG
Inuyama Old Town

The area around Inuyama was settled from prehistoric times. During the Sengoku period, part of the Battle of Komaki and Nagakute was fought in what is now Inuyama, and the Oda clan rebuilt a pre-existing fortification into Inuyama Castle. Under the Edo period Tokugawa shogunate, Inuyama was ruled as a sub-domain of Owari Domain, entrusted to the Naruse clan, who served as senior retainers of the Nagoya-branch of the Tokugawa clan. Immediately following the Meiji Restoration in 1868, Inuyama was established as an independent feudal han, until the 1871 abolition of the han system.

With the establishment of the modern municipalities system on October 1, 1889, the town of Inuyama was created. Inuyama Castle was designated as a national treasure in 1935 and again in 1952. Inuyama merged with four neighboring villages to from the city of Inuyama on April 1, 1954. In 2016, the Inuyama Festival was proclaimed an Intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO.

Government

Inuyama has a mayor-council form of government with a directly elected mayor and a unicameral city legislature of 20 members. The city contributes one member to the Aichi Prefectural Assembly. In terms of national politics, the city is part of Aichi District 6 of the lower house of the Diet of Japan.

Education

University

National Universities
Private Universities

Colleges

Private Colleges

School

Inuyama has ten public elementary schools and four public junior high schools operated by the city government, and two public high schools operated by the Aichi Prefectural Board of Education.

Transportation

Railways

Meitetsu logomark 2.svg MeitetsuInuyama Line

Meitetsu logomark 2.svg MeitetsuKomaki Line

Meitetsu logomark 2.svg MeitetsuHiromi Line

Hishways

Local attractions

Castles

Museums

Natural attractions

Other structures

Culture

Twin towns – sister cities

Inuyama is twinned with: [5]

Notable people from Inuyama

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Inuyama Castle

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Mount Komaki

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Battle of Gifu Castle

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Gakuden Station (Aichi) Railway station in Inuyama, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

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Aigi Bridge

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Kaneyama Castle Castle ruins in Gifu, Japan

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References

  1. https://www.city.inuyama.aichi.jp Inuyama City official statistics] (in Japanese)
  2. Inuyama population statistics
  3. Inuyama climate data
  4. Monkeys use trees as catapults in escape from Kyoto Uni's primate research centre, 7 July 2010 , The Courier-Mail , Queensland Newspapers.
  5. "姉妹・友好都市". city.inuyama.aichi.jp (in Japanese). Inuyama. Retrieved 2021-01-07.