Inventor

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An inventor is a person who creates or discovers a new method, form, device or other useful means that becomes known as an invention. The word inventor comes from the Latin verb invenire, invent-, to find. [1] [2] The system of patents was established to encourage inventors by granting limited-term, limited monopoly on inventions determined to be sufficiently novel, non-obvious, and useful. Although inventing is closely associated with science and engineering, inventors are not necessarily engineers nor scientists. [3]

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References

  1. inventor. Dictionary.com. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
  2. invent. Merriam-Webster. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
    • Inventor. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 1 October 2017.