Ion Cortright

Last updated
Ion Cortright
Ion Cortright - Cincinnati.jpg
Cortright pictured in The Cincinnatian 1917, Cincinnati yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1889-06-29)June 29, 1889
Eaton County, Michigan
DiedJune 3, 1961(1961-06-03) (aged 71)
East Lansing, Michigan
Playing career
Football
1907–1910 Michigan Agricultural
Position(s) Halfback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1911–1913 Michigan Agricultural (assistant)
1914–1915 South Dakota
1916 Cincinnati
1925–1927 North Dakota Agricultural
Basketball
1914–1915 South Dakota
1916–1917 Cincinnati
1925–1926 North Dakota Agricultural
Head coaching record
Overall22–20–6 (football)
38–14 (basketball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 NCC (1925)

Ion John Cortright (June 29, 1889 – June 3, 1961) [1] was an American football player and coach of football and basketball. He served as the head football coach at the University of South Dakota (1914–1915), the University of Cincinnati (1916), and North Dakota Agricultural College, now North Dakota State University, (1925–1927), compiling a career college football record of 22–20–6. Cortright was also the head basketball coach at South Dakota for one season in 1914–15, Cincinnati for one season in 1916–17, and North Dakota Agricultural for one season in 1925–26, tallying a career mark of 38–14.

Contents

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
South Dakota Coyotes (Independent)(1914–1915)
1914 South Dakota 5–2–1
1915 South Dakota 4–2–2
South Dakota:9–4–3
Cincinnati Bearcats (Ohio Athletic Conference)(1916)
1916 Cincinnati 0–8–10–6–113th
Cincinnati:0–8–10–6–1
North Dakota Agricultural Bison (North Central Conference)(1925–1927)
1925 North Dakota Agricultural 5–0–24–0–2T–1st
1926 North Dakota Agricultural 5–32–36th
1927 North Dakota Agricultural 3–51–35th
North Dakota Agricultural:13–8–27–6–2
Total:22–20–6
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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The 1914 South Dakota Coyotes football team represented the University of South Dakota during the 1914 college football season. In Ion Cortright's 1st year as head coach, the Coyotes compiled a 5–2–1 record, and outscored their opponents 111 to 75. The Coyotes played a tough schedule, with regional powerhouses Nebraska, Notre Dame, and Minnesota. South Dakota did not manage to win any of these contests, but they did break a 14 game winning streak when they tied Nebraska 0–0 at Lincoln, and would become the Cornhuskers only blemish in a 34 game stretch from 1912 to 1916.

The 1926 North Dakota Agricultural Bison football team was an American football team that represented North Dakota Agricultural College in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1926 college football season. In its second season under head coach Ion Cortright, the team compiled a 5–3 record and finished in sixth place out of eight teams in the NCC. The team played its home games at Dacotah Field in Fargo, North Dakota.

The 1927 North Dakota Agricultural Bison football team was an American football team that represented North Dakota Agricultural College in the North Central Conference (NCC) during the 1927 college football season. In its third season under head coach Ion Cortright, the team compiled a 3–5 record and finished in fifth place out of teams in the NCC. The team played its home games at Dacotah Field in Fargo, North Dakota.

References

  1. "Cortright Rites Set", Star-News, June 6, 1961, Pasadena, California