Isabel of Beaumont

Last updated

Isabel de Beaumont, Duchess of Lancaster
Bornc.1320
Died1361
Noble family Brienne
Spouse(s) Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster
Father Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan
Mother Alice Comyn

Isabel de Beaumont, Duchess of Lancaster, of the House of Brienne (c.1320 1361) was an English noblewoman, being the youngest daughter and child of Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan and Alice Comyn.

Family

Isabel was born in about 1320. She had nine older siblings, including John de Beaumont, 2nd Lord Beaumont. Isabel's paternal grandparents were Louis of Brienne, Viscount de Beaumont, and Agnes, Viscountess de Beaumont. Her maternal grandparents were Alexander Comyn, Sheriff of Aberdeen and Joan le Latimer. Louis of Brienne was a younger son of John of Brienne by his third wife, Berengaria of Leon while Alexander Comyn was a younger brother of John Comyn, Earl of Buchan.

Marriage and children

She married Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster in 1337. Isabel bore Henry two daughters who would eventually inherit their father's estates:

Isabel died of the plague in 1361 at Leicester Castle. She was buried in Newark Abbey, Leicester. Her husband also died of the plague in March 1361.

Through Blanche, Isabel was an ancestress of Englands's Royal House of Lancaster, with Henry IV of England being her grandson. Philippa of Lancaster, Queen of Portugal and the Algarve and Elizabeth of Lancaster, Duchess of Exeter were also her grandchildren.


Related Research Articles

John of Gaunt 14th-century English prince, Duke of Lancaster

John of Gaunt was an English prince, military leader, and statesman. He was the third of the five sons of King Edward III of England who survived to adulthood. Due to his royal origin, advantageous marriages, and some generous land grants, Gaunt was one of the richest men of his era, and was an influential figure during the reigns of both his father, Edward, and his nephew, Richard II. As Duke of Lancaster, he is the founder of the royal House of Lancaster, whose members would ascend to the throne after his death. His birthplace, Ghent, corrupted into English as Gaunt, was the origin for his name. When he became unpopular later in life, a scurrilous rumour circulated, along with lampoons, claiming that he was actually the son of a Ghent butcher. This rumour, which infuriated him, may have been inspired by the fact that Edward III had not been present at his birth.

Katherine Swynford Duchess of Lancaster

Katherine Swynford, Duchess of Lancaster, also spelled Katharine or Catherine, was the third wife of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, a son of King Edward III. She had been the Duke's lover for many years before their marriage. The couple's children, born before the marriage, were later legitimised during the reign of the Duke's nephew, Richard II. When the Duke's son from his first marriage overthrew Richard, becoming Henry IV, he introduced a provision [citation needed] that neither they nor their descendants could ever claim the throne of England, however, the legitimacy for all rights was a parliamentary statute that Henry IV lacked the authority to amend.

Earl of Leicester

Earl of Leicester is a title that has been created seven times. The first title was granted during the 12th century in the Peerage of England. The current title is in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and was created in 1837.

Eleanor of Lancaster Lady Beaumont

Eleanor of Lancaster, Countess of Arundel was the fifth daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster

Henry, 3rd Earl of Leicester and Lancaster was a grandson of King Henry III (1216–1272) of England and was one of the principals behind the deposition of King Edward II (1307–1327), his first cousin.

Earl of Buchan Title of nobility in the United Kingdom

The Mormaer or Earl of Buchan was originally the provincial ruler of the medieval province of Buchan. Buchan was the first Mormaerdom in the High Medieval Kingdom of the Scots to pass into the hands of a non-Scottish family in the male line. The earldom had three lines in its history, not counting passings from female heirs to sons. Today it is held by the Erskine family as a peerage. The current holder is Malcolm Erskine, 17th Earl of Buchan.

Margaret Wake,suo jure3rd Baroness Wake of Liddell and Countess of Kent was the wife of Edmund of Woodstock, 1st Earl of Kent, the youngest surviving son of Edward I of England and Margaret of France.

Maud de Chaworth was an English noblewoman and wealthy heiress. She was the only child of Patrick de Chaworth. Sometime before 2 March 1297, she married Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, by whom she had seven children.

Margaret of Norfolk or Margaret of Brotherton, in her own right Countess of Norfolk, was the daughter and eventual sole heir of Thomas of Brotherton, eldest son of King Edward I of England by his second marriage. In 1338, she succeeded to the earldom of Norfolk and the office of Earl Marshal.

Blanche of Lancaster 14th-century English noblewoman

Blanche of Lancaster was a member of the English royal House of Plantagenet and the daughter of the kingdom's wealthiest and most powerful peer, Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster. She was the first wife of John of Gaunt, the mother of King Henry IV, and the grandmother of King Henry V of England.

Henry de Beaumont

Henry de Beaumont, jure uxoris 4th Earl of Buchan and suo jure 1st Baron Beaumont, was a key figure in the Anglo-Scots wars of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, known as the Wars of Scottish Independence.

Joan of Lancaster Baroness de Mowbray

Joan of Lancaster sometimes called Joan Plantagenet after her dynasty's name, was the third daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth.

Maud of Lancaster, also known as Matilda, Countess of Hainault, was a 14th-century English noblewoman who married into the Bavarian ducal family.

Events from the 1360s in England.

Countess of Leicester is a title given to the wife of the Earl of Leicester. Women who have held the title include:

Alice de Warenne, Countess of Arundel was an English noblewoman and heir apparent to the Earldom of Surrey. In 1305, she married Edmund FitzAlan, 9th Earl of Arundel.

Joan FitzAlan, Countess of Hereford, Countess of Essex and Countess of Northampton was the wife of the 7th Earl of Hereford, 6th Earl of Essex and 2nd Earl of Northampton. She was the mother of Mary de Bohun, the first wife of Henry of Bolingbroke who later reigned as King Henry IV, and Eleanor de Bohun, Duchess of Gloucester. She was the maternal grandmother of King Henry V.

Margaret of Baux was a Countess of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano. She was a member of the noble House of Baux of the Kingdom of Naples, which had its origins in Provence dating back to the 11th century. Her husband was Peter of Luxembourg, Count of Saint-Pol, of Brienne, and of Conversano. Margaret's descendants include English Queen Consort Elizabeth Woodville, King Henry IV of France, Mary, Queen of Scots, and all English monarchs after 1509.

Alice Comyn, Countess of Buchan, Lady Beaumont was a Scottish noblewoman, a member of the powerful Comyn family which supported the Balliols, claimants to the disputed Scottish throne against their rivals, the Bruces. She was the niece of John Comyn, Earl of Buchan, to whom she was also heiress, and after his death the Earldom of Buchan was successfully claimed by her husband Henry de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, by right of his wife. His long struggle to claim her Earldom of Buchan was one of the causes of the Second War of Scottish Independence.

John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave

John Segrave, 4th Baron Segrave was an English peer and landowner in Leicestershire and Yorkshire. His family title of Baron Segrave is drawn from a village now spelled Seagrave, which uses a coat of arms imitated from that of the family.