Ivor Barnard

Last updated

Ivor Barnard
Ivor Barnard in Beat the Devil.JPG
Barnard in Beat the Devil (1953)
Born(1887-06-13)13 June 1887
Marylebone, London, England
Died30 June 1953(1953-06-30) (aged 66)
Westminster, London, England
OccupationActor
Years active19091953

Ivor Barnard (13 June 1887 30 June 1953) was an English stage, radio and film actor. [1] He was an original member of the Birmingham Repertory Theatre, where he was a notable Shylock and Caliban. He was the original Water Rat in the first London production of A. A. Milne's "Toad of Toad Hall". In 1929 he appeared on stage as Blanquet, in "Bird in Hand" at the Morosco Theatre in New York, after a successful run in London's West End (Laurence Olivier was the juvenile). The part had been specially written for him by John Drinkwater. [2]

Contents

He appeared in more than 80 films between 1921 and 1953. He appeared in the Alfred Hitchcock film The 39 Steps in 1935. In 1943, he played the stationmaster in the Ealing war film Undercover . He also appeared as Wemmick in David Lean's Great Expectations (1946), and as the Chairman of the Workhouse, in Lean's film Oliver Twist (1948). One of his last film appearances was as the murderer Major Jack Ross in John Huston's Beat the Devil (1953) with Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre. [3] [4]

Partial filmography

Radio

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ward Bond</span> American actor (1903–1960)

Wardell Edwin Bond was an American film character actor who appeared in more than 200 films and starred in the NBC television series Wagon Train from 1957 to 1960. Among his best-remembered roles are Bert the cop in Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Captain Clayton in John Ford's The Searchers (1956). As a character actor, Bond frequently played cowboys, cops and soldiers.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tom London</span> American actor (1889–1963)

Tom London was an American actor who played frequently in B-Westerns. According to The Guinness Book of Movie Records, London is credited with appearing in the most films in the history of Hollywood, according to the 2001 book Film Facts, which says that the performer who played in the most films was "Tom London, who made his first of over 2,000 appearances in The Great Train Robbery, 1903. He used his birth name in films until 1924.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Henry O'Neill</span> American actor (1891–1961)

Henry O'Neill was an American actor known for playing gray-haired fathers, lawyers, and similarly dignified roles on film during the 1930s and 1940s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Jenks</span> American actor (1902–1962)

Frank Jenks was an American actor and vaudevillian.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frank Reicher</span> German-American actor

Frank Reicher was a German-born American actor, director and producer. He is best known for playing Captain Englehorn in the 1933 film King Kong.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paul Hurst (actor)</span> American actor (1888–1953)

Paul Causey Hurst was an American actor and director.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Samuel S. Hinds</span> American actor (1875–1948)

Samuel Southey Hinds was an American actor and former lawyer. He was often cast as kindly authority figures and appeared in more than 200 films in a career lasting 22 years.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ian Wolfe</span> American actor (1896–1992)

Ian Marcus Wolfe was an American character actor with around 400 film and television credits. Until 1934, he worked in the theatre. That year, he appeared in his first film role and later television, as a character actor. His career lasted seven decades and included many films and TV series; his last screen credit was in 1990.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Joe Sawyer</span> Canadian actor (1906–1982)

Joe Sawyer was a Canadian film actor. He appeared in more than 200 films between 1927 and 1962, and was sometimes billed under his birth name.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Cleveland</span> Canadian-American actor (1885–1957)

George Alan Cleveland was a Canadian film actor. He appeared in more than 180 films between 1930 and 1954.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Selmer Jackson</span> American actor (1888–1971)

Selmer Adolf Jackson was an American stage film and television actor. He appeared in nearly 400 films between 1921 and 1963. His name was sometimes spelled Selmar Jackson.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Merritt (actor)</span> English actor (1890–1977)

Frederick George Merritt was an English theatre, film and television actor, often in authoritarian roles. He studied German theatre in Magdeburg, Germany, and taught at the Berlitz School at the outbreak of the First World War, when he was held as a British Civil Prisoner of War, and interned at Ruhleben, 1914–1918. He was involved in over 50 plays at Ruhleben. He lived for many years in Lissenden Gardens, Parliament Hill, north west London.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Eliot Makeham</span> English actor (1882–1956)

Harold Elliott Makeham was an English film and television actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Paul Stanton (actor)</span> American character actor (1884–1955)

Paul Stanton was an American character actor and bit-part player in American films.

Franklin Parker, also known as Frank Parker or Franklyn Parker, was an American character actor who appeared in over 100 films during his twenty-five year career. Born in Fillmore, Missouri on November 8, 1902, he began his show business career on the vaudeville and Broadway stages, where he proved himself an admirable singer. During those years he would often be billed as Pinky. His final screen performance was on television, on The Donna Reed Show in 1961, where he was credited as Franklin Pinky Parker. His film career included appearances in such classic films as They Were Expendable, It's a Wonderful Life, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, Mighty Joe Young, and Pat and Mike. Occasionally he would have a larger role, such as the lead in the 1935 film, Sweet Surrender. He died of a heart attack in Hollywood, California on June 12, 1962.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edward Keane (actor)</span> American actor (1884–1959)

Edward Keane was an American film actor. He appeared in more than 300 films between 1921 and 1955.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ray Walker (actor)</span> American actor (1904–1980)

Warren Reynolds "Ray" Walker was an American actor, born in Newark, New Jersey, who starred in Baby Take a Bow (1934), Hideaway Girl (1936), The Dark Hour (1936), The Unknown Guest (1943) and It's A Wonderful Life (1946).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sam Flint</span> American actor (1882–1980)

Sam Flint was an American actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles Williams (American actor)</span> American actor and writer (1898–1958)

Charles Williams was an American actor and writer. He appeared in over 260 film and television productions between 1922 and 1956. He also worked as a writer on 30 films between 1932 and 1954.

Ben Lewis (1894–1970) was an American film editor who worked in Hollywood for several decades. He was employed by MGM for many years, beginning his career with them in the silent era. An early credit was for Quality Street (1927) starring Marion Davies.

References

  1. "Ivor Barnard". BFI. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012.
  2. "UoB Calmview5: Search results". calmview.bham.ac.uk.
  3. "Ivor Barnard movies, photos, movie reviews, filmography, and biography - AllMovie". AllMovie.
  4. "Filmography for Ivor Barnard". Turner Classic Movies.
  5. "The Dark Tower". Genome . BBC. 21 January 1946.