Ivory Coast women's national football team

Last updated
Ivory Coast
Association Fédération Ivoirienne de Football
Confederation CAF (Africa)
Sub-confederation WAFU (West Africa)
Head coach Clémentine Touré
Captain Dominique Thiamalé
FIFA code CIV
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body CostadeMarfil12Casa.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks civ1113home.png
Kit socks long.svg
First colours
Kit left arm.svg
Kit body civ1113away.png
Kit body.svg
Kit right arm.svg
Kit shorts.svg
Kit socks whitetop.png
Kit socks long.svg
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 68 Increase2.svg 1 (7 December 2018) [1]
Highest59 (March 2017)
Lowest136 (2011)
First international
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0–3 Netherlands  Flag of the Netherlands.svg
(1 June 1988, Foshan, China)
Biggest win
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 7–0 Mozambique  Flag of Mozambique.svg
(26 May 2012, Abidjan, Ivory Coast)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg  Ivory Coast 0–10 Germany  Flag of Germany.svg
(7 June 2015, Ottawa, Canada)
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2015 )
Best resultGroup Stage, (2015)
Africa Women Cup of Nations
Appearances2 (first in 2012 )
Best result3rd place, (2014)

The Ivory Coast women's national football team represents Ivory Coast in international women's football and is controlled by the Fédération Ivoirienne de Football. They played their first international match in 1988. The team is currently ranked 64th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings and as the 6th best team in CAF.

Ivory Coast State in West Africa

Ivory Coast or Côte d'Ivoire, officially the Republic of Côte d'Ivoire, is a country located on the south coast of West Africa. Ivory Coast's political capital is Yamoussoukro in the centre of the country, while its economic capital and largest city is the port city of Abidjan. It borders Guinea and Liberia to the west, Burkina Faso and Mali to the north, Ghana to the east, and the Gulf of Guinea to the south.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football or women's soccer is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

The FIFA Women's World Rankings for football were introduced in 2003, with the first rankings published in March of that year, as a follow-on to the existing Men's FIFA World Rankings. They attempt to compare the strength of internationally active women's national teams at any given time.

Contents

History

In 1985, almost no country in the world had a women's national football team, [2] including Côte d'Ivoire who did not play their first FIFA recognised match until 1988 [3] when they participated in the Women's FIFA Invitational Tournament 1988. The country was in Group A. On 1 June, they lost to the Netherlands 0–3 in a game in Foshan. On 3 June, they lost to Canada 0–6 in a game in Foshan. In a game on 5 June, they lost to China 1–8 in a game in Guangzhou. [4] In 1992, they competed at the 1st Lyon'ne Cup — Women, held in Lyon, France from 17–20 April. Côte d'Ivoire was in the nation's group. They lost to the United States U20 team 0–4, lost to the CIS team 0–3 and lost to France 1–6. [5] In 2002, the team competed in 2 matches. [6] In 2003, they played in 0 matches. [6] In 2004, they played in 0 matches. [6] In 2005, they played in 3 matches. [6] In 2006, they played in 2 matches. [6] In 2006, the team had 3 training sessions a week. [6] In 2005, they played in the women's Tournoi de Solidarité in Dakar, Senegal. On 18 May, they lost to Mali 1–6. On 20 May, they tied Senegal 3–3. They did not make the finals and overall finished last in the tournament. [7] On 17 May 2006 in Dakar, Togo tied Côte d'Ivoire 3–3. [8] In 2007, the country competed at the Tournoi de Cinq Nations held in Ouagadougou. On 2 September, they tied Mali 1–1 with Rita Akaffou scoring for the team in the 65th minute. On 5 September, they beat Togo 5–0 before Togo was disqualified from the competition for bringing a club team. On 6 September, they lost to Mali 1–2. [9] In 2010, the country had a team at the African Women's Championships during the preliminary rounds. In the round, they beat Guinea 5–1. They lost to Malawi 4–2 in the return leg. [10] In the 2010, Women's Championship in Africa, they lost in the preliminary round in March, they beat Gabon at home and away 2–1 and 3–1. In the first round against Nigeria, they lost both matches by scores of 1–2 and 1–3. [11] The country did not have a team competing at the 2011 All Africa Games. [12]

Foshan Prefecture-level city in Guangdong, Peoples Republic of China

Foshan, formerly romanized as Fatshan, is a prefecture-level city in central Guangdong Province, China. The entire prefecture covers 3,848.49 km2 (1,485.91 sq mi) and has an urban population around 7.2 million in 2012. It forms part of the western side of the Pearl River Delta Economic Zone, which includes Guangzhou to the east and northeast and Zhongshan to the southeast.

Guangzhou Prefecture-level and Sub-provincial city in Guangdong, Peoples Republic of China

Guangzhou, also known as Canton, is the capital and most populous city of the province of Guangdong in southern China. On the Pearl River about 120 km (75 mi) north-northwest of Hong Kong and 145 km (90 mi) north of Macau, Guangzhou has a history of over 2,200 years and was a major terminus of the maritime Silk Road, and continues to serve as a major port and transportation hub, as well as one of China's three largest cities.

Dakar Capital city in Senegal

Dakar is the capital and largest city of Senegal. It is located on the Cap-Vert peninsula on the Atlantic coast and is the westernmost city on the African mainland. The city of Dakar proper has a population of 1,030,594, whereas the population of the Dakar metropolitan area is estimated at 2.45 million.

The national team has trained in Abidjan. [13] As of 2006, the country did not have an under-17 or under-20 side. [6] In June 2012, the team was ranked 67th in the world by FIFA and the 6th best team in CAF. [14] This was an improvement of four places from March 2012 when they were ranked 71st in the world. The team's worst ever ranking was in 2011 when they were ranked 136th in the world. Other rankings include 73 in 2006, 75 in 2007, 74 in 2008, 92 in 2009, and 77 in 2010. [15]

Abidjan City and autonomous district in Côte dIvoire

Abidjan is the economic capital of Ivory Coast and one of the most populous French-speaking cities in Africa. According to the 2014 census, Abidjan's population was 4.7 million, which is 20 percent of the overall population of the country, and this also makes it the sixth most populous city proper in Africa, after Lagos, Cairo, Kinshasa, Dar es Salaam, and Johannesburg. A cultural crossroads of West Africa, Abidjan is characterised by a high level of industrialisation and urbanisation.

However, in 2014 African Women's Championship, Ivory Coast surprised everyone by passing through into the semi-final, and later, they shocked Africa by beating giant South Africa, marked for the first time they would play in FIFA Women's World Cup, in Canada 2015. In the later tournament, the World Cup, they were eliminated with three total losses to Germany (0–10), Thailand (2–3) and Norway (1–3). Despite having lost all, Ange N'Guessan's goal over Norway was voted as one of ten best goal in the whole tournament.

2014 African Womens Championship

The 2014 African Women's Championship, the 11th edition of the tournament, was held in Namibia. This tournament, organized by the Confederation of African Football, was also a qualification tournament for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup, with top three qualifying for the finals in Canada. It was played on 11–25 October 2014.

The South Africa national women's football team, nicknamed Banyana Banyana, is the national team of South Africa and is controlled by the South African Football Association.

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Background and development

Early development of the women's game at the time colonial powers brought football to the continent was limited, as colonial powers in the region tended to take concepts of patriarchy and women's participation in sport with them to local cultures that had similar concepts already embedded in them. [16] The lack of later development of the national team on a wider international level symptomatic of all African teams is a result of several factors, including limited access to education, poverty amongst women in the wider society, and fundamental inequality present in the society that occasionally allows for female-specific human rights abuses. [17] When quality female football players are developed, they tend to leave for greater opportunities abroad. [18] Continent-wide, funding is also an issue, with most development money coming from FIFA, not the national football association. [18] Future success for women's football in Africa is dependent on improved facilities and access by women to these facilities. Attempting to commercialise the game and make it commercially viable is not the solution, as demonstrated by the current existence of many youth and women's football camps held throughout the continent. [16]

Football is the fourth most popular girls' sport, trailing behind handball, basketball and athletics. [6] A women's football program was set up in the country in 1975 [13] and girls' football is played in schools. [6] Player registration starts at nine years of age. [13] In 2006, there were 610 registered female players, 560 of whom were senior players and 50 were under 18 years of age. [6] This was an increase from 2002 when there were 130 registered female players, 2003 when there were 220, 2004 when there were 253, and 2005 when there were 428 registered players. [6] In 2006, there were 123 football clubs in the country, of which 11 were women's-only sides. [6] As of 2009, there are 36 senior teams and 4 youth teams for women. [13] A school based competition exists. [13]

Basketball team sport played on a court with baskets on either end

Basketball is a team sport in which two teams, most commonly of five players each, opposing one another on a rectangular court, compete with the primary objective of shooting a basketball through the defender's hoop while preventing the opposing team from shooting through their own hoop. A field goal is worth two points, unless made from behind the three-point line, when it is worth three. After a foul, timed play stops and the player fouled or designated to shoot a technical foul is given one or more one-point free throws. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins, but if regulation play expires with the score tied, an additional period of play (overtime) is mandated.

The national federation was created in 1960 and became FIFA affiliated in 1964. [6] [19] [20] Their kit includes orange shirts, white shorts and green socks. [19] The national committee does not have a full-time employee in charge of women's football. [6] Representation of women's football is not guaranteed in the federation's constitution. [6] The FIFA trigramme is CIV. [21] A FIFA-run women's MA football course was run in the country in 2007. [13]

Tournament record

World Cup

YearResultPositionPldWDLGFGA
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Enter
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Did Not Enter
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Enter
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Did Not Qualify
Flag of Canada.svg 2015 Group Stage23rd3003316
Flag of France.svg 2019 Did Not Qualify
Total1/8-3003316

Africa Women's Championship

CAF Women's Championship
YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
1991 Did not enter
1995
Flag of Nigeria.svg 1998
Flag of South Africa.svg 2000
Flag of Nigeria.svg 2002 Did not qualify
Flag of South Africa.svg 2004 Did not enter
Flag of Nigeria.svg 2006 Did not qualify
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2008
Flag of South Africa.svg 2010
Flag of Equatorial Guinea.svg 2012 Group stage310277
Flag of Namibia.svg 2014 Third place521288
Flag of Cameroon.svg 2016 Did not qualify
Flag of Ghana.svg 2018 Did not qualify
Total2/1383141515

Current squad

The following players were called up for two 2018 Africa Women Cup of Nations qualifying matches against Mali. [22]

Head coach: Clémentine Touré

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Cynthia Djohore (1987-12-16) 16 December 1987 (age 31)270 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Onze Sœurs de Gagnoa
161 GK Aminata Diabaté (1998-11-15) 15 November 1998 (age 20) Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Juventus de Yopougon

22 DF Fatou Coulibaly (Captain) (1987-02-13) 13 February 1987 (age 31)311 Flag of Cyprus.svg Barcelona FA
32 DF Djelika Coulibaly (1984-02-22) 22 February 1984 (age 34)290 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Juventus de Yopougon
42 DF Nina Kpaho (1996-12-30) 30 December 1996 (age 22)120 Flag of Belarus.svg FC Minsk
52 DF Mariam Diakité (1995-04-11) 11 April 1995 (age 23)129 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Africa Sport
132 DF Fernande Tchetche (1988-06-20) 20 June 1988 (age 30)190 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Affoubenou FC
182 DF Raymonde Kacou (1987-01-07) 7 January 1987 (age 32)60 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Juventus de Yopougon
202 DF Lynda Gauze (1990-06-11) 11 June 1990 (age 28) Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Juventus de Yopougon

63 MF Rolande Tokpoledo (1992-12-15) 15 December 1992 (age 26) Flag of Morocco.svg CMLFF
93 MF Bernadette Kakounan (1997-09-05) 5 September 1997 (age 21)
123 MF Ida Guehai (1994-07-15) 15 July 1994 (age 24)221 Flag of Spain.svg Logroño
153 MF Christine Lohoues (1992-10-18) 18 October 1992 (age 26)221 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Onze Sœurs de Gagnoa
173 MF Nadège Cissé (1997-04-04) 4 April 1997 (age 21)60 Flag of Belarus.svg FC Minsk
193 MF Jessica Aby (1998-06-16) 16 June 1998 (age 20)10 Flag of Cote d'Ivoire.svg Onze Sœurs de Gagnoa
3 MF Rita Akaffou (1986-12-05) 5 December 1986 (age 32)334 Flag of Cyprus.svg Barcelona FA

74 FW Oura Agnès Kouame (1991-05-10) 10 May 1991 (age 27) Flag of France.svg Réveil Football Is-sur-Tille
84 FW Ines Nrehy (1993-10-01) 1 October 1993 (age 25)1713 Flag of South Korea.svg Gyeongju KHNP
104 FW Ange N'Guessan (1990-11-18) 18 November 1990 (age 28)193 Flag of Spain.svg Granadilla
114 FW Rebecca Elloh (1994-12-25) 25 December 1994 (age 24)152 Flag of Cyprus.svg Barcelona FA
144 FW Josée Nahi (1989-05-29) 29 May 1989 (age 29)1812 Flag of South Korea.svg Gyeongju KHNP
224 FW Binta Diakité (1988-05-07) 7 May 1988 (age 30)202 Flag of Belarus.svg FC Minsk
4 FW Nadege Essoh (1990-05-05) 5 May 1990 (age 28)294 Flag of France.svg CSFA Ambilly

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